EDITORIAL: Putin’s Russia is Brutal, Cruel and Inhumane

Yuri Shevchuk lays down the law to Vladimir Putin

EDITORIAL

Putin’s Russia is Brutal, Cruel and Inhumane

The system that has been built in our country is brutal, cruel, and inhumane. People are suffering, not only in prisons and camps, but in orphanages and hospitals as well. So many bastards are feeding themselves on power. With epaulettes on their shoulders and with flashing lights in their heads, they are robbing us, running us over on the road, and shooting us in stores. And nobody is being held accountable.

You may think those words were uttered by some demonic foreign “Russophobe” who just doesn’t know how great things are on the ground in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, but if you think that you are very, very much mistaken.

Russian rocker Yuri Shevchuk of the seminal band DDT uttered those words during a concert last weekend in Moscow. A video of the remarks has gone viral in Russia (already collecting nearly over 175,000 views and over 500 comments). In a subsequent interview, Shevchuk warned ominously: “I know there are thousands of wonderful musicians who sing songs about civil themes, who do not agree with what is happening in this country. There are a lot of wonderful young people who are playing in cellars. And all this is gaining some critical mass.”

Radio Free Europe provides the evidence that Shevchuk is right:

On Monday, day after Shevchuk’s comments, the popular actor Aleksei Devotchenko — star of popular TV crime shows like “Streets Of Broken Lamps” and ‘Bandit St. Petersburg” — posted a diary on the Internet criticizing his colleagues for cozying up to the Kremlin and making “pseudo-patriotic” propaganda films.

And “Vedomosti” is reporting today that a group of 13 cultural figures, including music critic and media personality Artyom Troitsky, have penned an open letter to President Dmitry Medvedev calling for an investigation into an automobile accident involving LUKoil vice president Anatoly Barkov in which two women, 36-year-old Olga Aleksandrina and 72-year-old Vera Sidelnikova, were killed.

The rapper MC Noize, who a close friend of one of Aleksandrina’s sister, posted a protest song on the Internet condemning Barkov, LUKoil, and the Russian authorities.

Musicians and actors. Disgruntled cops. Frustrated workers. Rechnik. Kaliningrad.This drip drip drip of social dissent is building — slowly, surely, and clearly.

There are, make no mistake about it, echoes of the Soviet Union.  The echoes of Samizdat, of underground movements, frightened patriots hiding in basements, whispering about freedom.

And Russia is ruled, of course, by the KGB.

But perhaps the tide begins now to turn against Russia’s demonic, isolated, ignorant rulers.  At last, the true consequences of their misrule are being felt wide and deep in Russia, and the nation’s remaining patriots may now be realizing that they must act now, before their chance slips away.

Celebrities like Shevchuk must make common cause with the political opposition, and all the members of the front must then unify, rather than bickering and sniping as they have done in the past.  If this is done, the movement can grow, and it can force its way into the corridors of power.  If it is not, Russia will slide into the abyss.

69 responses to “EDITORIAL: Putin’s Russia is Brutal, Cruel and Inhumane

  1. The Republic of Belarus is ruled by the KGB.

    LA RUSSOPHOBE RESPONDS:

    Gosh Mark, what do you know about Lukashenko that we don’t? We thought he was a farmer and a soldier.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Lukashenko

    Vladimir Putin, by contrast, SPENT HIS WHOLE LIFE IN THE KGB. He has A SECRET RESUME. And it is a documented fact that the Kremlin is FULL of his hand-picked KGB flunkies.

    Your attempt to change the subject is truly pathetic. But it’s nice to see the Russophile rabble getting so desperate.

    • So that makes it OK for Russia to be ruled by the Chekist/OGPU/NKVD/KGB/FSB (Same people different name…)?

      Come on Mark, try and come up with a real argument….

      • You forgot some Checka nicknames, including NKGB (late Stalinism) and FSK (early Yeltsinism). Belarus was at least honest enough to quit this constant renaming charade.

        And so was the “republic of South Ossetia”. And thus the North Ossetia FSB personnel sent to work in the”security” structures of this of course absolutely independent and totally sovereign country are now in the KGB again.

        Belarusian KGB also didn’t kill thousands since 1991. Such a small detail, I guess.

        • I think you probably mean “Cheka” and “NKVD”

          • No, when I wrote “NKGB (late Stalinism)” I meant, guess what, NKGB (late Stalinism).

            The NKGB was formed from the structures of the NKVD in 1941 and then became the MGB (since 1946) and KGB (since 1954).

            The rest of the NKVD is now known as MVD, non-stop since 1946.

            • Interesting – I never heard of them. Well, you learn something new every day, if you’re paying attention and if you don’t already know everything. That’ll teach me not to research it first, whether I’ve heard of it or not.

    • Putin actually spent quite some time “retired”, working for the Russian Mafia in Germany (money-laundering), for the mayor of St. Pete, and for Yeltsin’s presidential administration.

    • You know very well what I meant – it isn’t called the KGB any more in Russia. You can argue if you like that it’s still exactly the same organization with the same people, but only the Republic of Belarus still uses the KGB tag. The Committee for State Security is now the FSB.

      I merely mention it in the interests of accuracy, so don’t waste your time moaning about the thousands killed, blah blah blah. If you don’t like it, do something about it other than agitating for exiled billionaires to assume power, cackling at each other from under your tinfoil hats and complusively rubbing your Captain Marvel decoder rings.

  2. Here is a much more biting satire from Shevchuk:

    ДДТ Юрий Шевчук – В гостях у генерала ФСБ

    Shevchuk – DDT – My Visit to an FSB General

  3. I dont think Putin should go – let him destroy Russia TOTALLY – and then Russia [ minus Siberia, Karelia, Tatarstan, Northen Caucasus, Northern Territory Konigsberg, etc.] will start anew.

    • That’s narrow-minded thinking. That would lead Siberia into the hands of an even crueler and more powerful dictatorship – China. I don’t know about you, but Chinese troops in the Urals, and redirecting all oil and gas towards China would be a huge strategic defeat for the West.

      • Give me a break, Putin is the most efficient Russian leader from the Stolypin times, with him Russia is getting stronger and stronger, so your chances to “destroy Russia” are getting really small. You had to use Eltzin times (when Russia was really collapsing) to destroy Russia, but now the time is over and the chances that Russia will be “destroyed” are the same as that EU will break down. Rather than that, Russia will claim new territories and establish itself as a super-empire. That should be your current concern.

  4. Journalists detained in Ingushetia: publications in media saved our lives

    http://www.eng.kavkaz-uzel.ru/articles/12740/

    Israpil Shovkhalov, editor-in-chief, and Abdullah Duduev, chief editor, of the Caucasian independent magazine “Dosh”, detained by power agents in Ingushetia on March 9, assert that timely publications in media about their detention allowed them to survive

    • Dec 04 2009, 21:00

      The international human rights organization “Reporters Without Borders” has awarded its Press Freedom Prize for the contribution into defence of the freedom of press to the “Dosh” (Word) magazine from Chechnya.

      The “Caucasian Knot” has reported that in June this year the “Reporters Without Borders” wrote in their report “Russian Caucasus: Media Behind Iron Curtain that in Chechnya and Ingushetia journalists were replaced by human rights activists, as here mass media do not dare to publish the information, painful for the authorities.

      The quarterly magazine “Dosh” became the laureate of the prize in the nomination “Mass Media of the Year”, as one of the few independent printed editions covering the situation in Northern Caucasus.

      According to Jean-Francois Julliard, secretary general of the “Reporters Without Borders”, the “persecuted” Chechen magazine “has demonstrated a surprising level of boldness and self-sacrifice,” as written by the Russian Service of the BBC TV Company.

      http://www.eng.kavkaz-uzel.ru/articles/11902/

      • “According to his story, many Russian mass media distort the real situation in Northern Caucasus and create a negative image of its residents; therefore, the publishers of the magazine believe it important “let them tell about themselves.”

        A negative image of its residents, like this one?

        http://www.esquire.com/features/ESQ0606BESLAN_140

        While the goal of freedom of the press is a noble one, the attention-deficit Abdullah Duduev apparently either moved there after 2004, or has a short memory.

        Before you chime in with jabbered defences of the poor downtrodden Chechens, I have it on no less an authority than the author(s) of this blog – not to mention the prevailing majority of commenters – that it is not only permissible, but encouraged, to hate all for the wrongs of the few.

        • What was your post even supposed to mean? Something about the hate of the Chechens because of Beslan incident, right? Chechens were a minority among the Beslan hostage takers (most were actually from Ingushetia), North Ossetians are residents of North Caucasus too, and the article you linked yourself writes about Chechnya:

          “You do not need to know it,” he said. “You do not know what is happening in Chechnya.”

          Followed by this backstory of Beslan:

          Spurred by Prime Minister Putin, who was soon to become president, Russia sent its armor back to Chechnya in 1999. This time Russia fought unsparingly. With little regard for life or property, its military surrounded Grozny and pounded the capital with rockets, artillery, and aircraft, collapsing the city around the rebels. Sweeps and barrages destroyed villages and towns. The destruction was of an order not seen since World War II; Grozny’s sagging hulks invited comparisons to Warsaw, 1944. The city fell early in 2000, and Putin, by then president, declared the battle ended. A new policy took shape. Russia would garrison troops and equipment and provide money, instructions, and political support. But local administration was to be handed over to Chechens deemed sufficiently loyal, a formula flowing from the institutional memory of a weakened empire. The appointment of proxies was accompanied by a message that became more hollow the more it was repeated on state TV: There is no war. We have won.

          No verified casualty counts exist for the wars, but all agree the human toll has been vast, ranging from tens of thousands of Chechens killed to more than two hundred thousand. Setting aside the numbers, the years of violence and atrocities made clear that as public policy, little could be less wise than extensive killing in Chechnya, where tradition asks blood to be washed in blood. Chechens are bound by adat, an oral code that compels families to avenge the killing of their relatives. By the time President Putin claimed victory, enough blood had been spilled for a fury lasting generations. It mixed not just tribal urges for revenge and independence but racism and militant Islam.

          The war that did not exist continued. Unable to defend Grozny conventionally, the rebels formed guerrilla bands, hiding amid the local populace and in nearby Russian republics and traveling between Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Turkey, where the Chechen diaspora is large. Islamic unrest expanded through Russia’s territory in the Caucasus, and underground jamaats with connections to the Chechens formed in at least six of the region’s internal republics. A rhythm emerged. Almost daily the separatists or their allies would stage small attacks or plant mines, and occasionally they would mass for large raids. In response to a spreading insurgency, the Russians set out to annihilate it, raiding homes in search of young men and generating complaints of rape, torture, robbery, and abduction. Macabre profiteering took hold, including sales of corpses back to families for burial.

          Terrorism had been part of the separatists’ struggle since before the first war. Basayev’s debut was as an airplane hijacker in 1991; mass hostage-taking began in 1995. But as death tolls rose and separatists were driven further underground, more turned to terrorism, then suicide terrorism. The rebels destroyed Chechnya’s seat of government with a truck bomb in 2002 and assassinated the Kremlin-backed president in 2004. At the center was Basayev, sardonic and lame. His terrorist group, the Riyadus-Salakhin Reconnaissance and Sabotage Battalion of Chechen Martyrs, included ethnic fighters from the Caucasus and foreigners, including Arabs and a few Europeans.

          A nationalist turned nihilist, Basayev made clear he thought Russian civilians were fair targets. After scores of hostages died at the theater in Moscow, he suggested Russia suffered what it deserved. “It turned out that these were innocent civilians who had gone to the theater for recreation,” he wrote. “In this regard, you have to ask yourself: Who are the more than three thousand children aged under ten who died during the three years of the brutal and bloody war in Chechnya? Who are the more than four thousand children who lost their legs, arms, eyes, who ended up paralyzed? Who are the thirty-five hundred missing people who have been abducted from their homes or detained in the streets by the Russian occupiers and whose fate remains a mystery? Who are the two hundred thousand slain women, elderly, ill, children, and men? Who are they?”

          That was a citation from your own article, to remind you about something, because of your “short memory” (of ” the destruction of an order not seen since World War II”).

          Now maybe let’s see Beslan, shall we:

          • And in case if you didn’t notice, in the film you could see some of the government lies in Beslan (“354 hostages”, “there are no demands”, “your president says no storming, he’s so wonderful, 100% at your side” etc). Including even completely obvious lies (“354 hostages”), despite the protests of the residents of North Caucasus gathered at the site (I guess you wrote something about hating them because of this, instead of hating the “wonderful” Russians like Putin). Followed by more killing.

            And “attention-deficit Abdullah Duduev”, who is fighting against such government lies by writing articles about the real situation, despite the danger to his life, actually remembers “the destruction of an order not seen since World War II” (such a small thing, easily forgettable), he rembers Beslan (and the lies of Beslan), he also remembers when a Russian (“federal”) death squad abducted him on May 9, 2010.

            Do you know they even dumped body parts of Beslan victims in a garbage dump? Such a symbolic gesture. Or this: http://www.rferl.org/content/article/1079352.html

          • You’ll have to excuse me; perhaps I’m a little slow, but I found this a fairly incoherent though emotional post. I note that tactically it’s a fairly good effort at changing the subject, though, and trying to force me on the defensive.

            First, my point is that boo hoo, it’s very sad if people have a negative view of Chechens after Beslan, and they ought not now be allowed to rewrite history by being lauded for their courage and their efforts to establish a free press.

            However, if your point is that because Russia killed thousands and thousands of Chechens, it’s only natural that Chechens should kill non-combatants and children in reprisal, better get your head down. Because by that standard, there’s a Japanese bomber with a big fat nuke inside that’s been overdue over New York since about 1945.

            Maybe Russia killed a lot of Chechens, but the BBC is not currently hailing Russia for its courage in establishing a free press, are they? If they did, the Chechens might be forgiven if they beg to differ.

            Same old story – Russians who kill Chechens are soulless savages – Chechens who kill Russian women and children are Freedom Fighters.

            • What are you talking about? Are you high on drugs? Mixed with vodka?

              Reporters Without Borders is not “the BBC”.

              Who exeactly “ought not now be allowed to rewrite history by being lauded for their courage and their efforts to establish a free press”?

              Japan did far worse things in the war than the United States (up to 30 million Chinese died due to the Japanese aggression). Japan also had their own nuclear weapons project in 1945, just as Germany. And the US conduct during the occpupation of Japan was simply excellent- maybe they just didn’t try enough of the Japanese war criminals, letting many go (including the Japanese biochemical warfare and research personnel). In any case, you can compare the US conduct during the occupation of Tokyo to the Japanese in captured Nanking (the Chinese capital at the time – looting, mass rapes, and the systematic murder of tens to hundreds of thousands of POWs and random civilians).

              Taking hostage is not the same as killing them. As in Moscow (gassed to death, and the chemist became the “Hero of Russia”), most of the people killed in Beslan were killed by the Russian government. And the Chechens killed by Russia (tens or hundreds of thousands of them) were also all “Russian citiziens”. When the Kremlin sent their forces to Chechnya, it was officially “to use all means available to the state to guarantee state security, lawfulness, rights and freedoms of citizens”.

              Vastly different numbers aside, what exactly is this supposed difference between a “Russian citizien” woman or child killed in Ossetia (North or South), and a “Russian citizien” woman or child killed in Chechnya (also in North Caucasus, including many ethnic Russians)? So the death of the former outrage people in Russia and beyond, and the death of the latter not really – and many people can be even enthusiastic about this, as in many “death to the monkeys”-style comments on YouTube?

              Maybe you can tell me, since you’re such an expert on all hate matters. Maybe it’s because the Chechens deported exactly all of the Russians in Russia in Kazakhstan in 1944, recently killed up to 15% of all Russians in the world, and completely destroyed the capital of Russia and most of the country, too? Is this the source of the common Russian hate towards their fellow “Russian citiziens” (also known as “monkeys”)? Maybe I’m just too “attention-deficit” with ” short memory”, as for some reason you declared the Dosh editors to be for the only reason of their fearless independent reporting, so I don’t remember any of this now?

              • Deported TO Kazakhstan, of course. With the mortality rate of 1/3 of the nation according to the official figures (mostly children and elderly):

                The Chechens were deported en masse, only excluding a few hundred men who managed to escape to the mountains at the last moment and who over the years tried to extract a vengeance for the deaths of their people through constant attacks on local Soviet institutions. The Chechen deportation, the most massive of all Soviet deportations, took place over the course of only a few days. However, in that period, during the middle of winter, almost 400,000 men, women and children were loaded into cattle cars and shipped to various locations, thousands of kilometers away. The victims were only allowed to take three days’ worth of rations and spent a horrifying two or three weeks on the road. Thousands died every day and the bodies were simply tossed out of the cars at every railroad station. Death quickly claimed the weakest – the elderly and the children (Radio Svoboda, February 23, 2000). According to the official Soviet figures, roughly a third of the whole Chechen nation perished during the thirteen years of exile, though independent researchers have suggested that essentially every second Chechen died during the Soviet government’s terrible crime against part of its own populace.

                Fifty years later, on February 24, 2004, the European Parliament suggested that the “deportation of the whole of the Chechen nation into Central Asia on February 23, 1944, as ordered by Joseph Stalin, was an act of genocide” [2]. Today’s Chechens cannot help but compare themselves to their countrymen that lived during the deportation. Even today, Russia, having unleashed this latest war, has caused every tenth Chechen to be killed, every third to flee the territory of the republic and another ten percent to seek refugee status in Europe, trying to escape the regime that hunts them today, just as they had in the past. In the Chechen republic, over ten thousand are wounded, several thousand are invalid children (many lacking limbs), and nearly 20 percent of the population is suffering from illness and requires medical aid.

                A more detailed article on the subject:

                http://www.massviolence.org/The-Massive-Deportation-of-the-Chechen-People-How-and-why

                The Chechen death toll remains a controversial issue. Chechens lost all collective existence during their thirteen years of exile as special settlers. They were excluded from all population censuses. The NKVD, which administrated the special camps, regularly reported on the demographic situation. The official documents, partly accessible through the Soviet archives reproduced in Nikolaj F. Bugj’s almost inexhaustible collection of works, show that Chechens deportees suffered very high mortality rates in the special settlements. Soviet officials assessed that during 1944 to 1948, the three most terrible years, between 14.6% and 23.7% of the outcast population perished (Bugai, 1992:264-265). These rough figures, however, do not take into account those who died during the initial expulsion and journey.

                The Chechen deportation gave way to violence and abuse. Unhealthy persons and those who opposed the expulsion were systematically shot on the spot. Testimonies also confirm the existence of mass killings in the mountains. To meet the objectives, soldiers were ordered to eliminate persons considered “unfit to travel”. About 700 persons originating from Khaibakh, a small mountain village and the surrounding farms, were killed. They were locked in a stable and burnt alive. It would have taken too much time to transport them to the valley on the snowy roads. The transport conditions were equally fatal to many Chechens: disease (like typhus), starvation and the cold took the most vulnerable persons. The non-respect of some traditions also caused the deaths of some Chechen women who refused to relieve themselves in front of men.

                Testimonies state that women, children, and elders were severely affected. Men, whether expelled with their families or sent into exile after demobilization, also suffered from the very austere living conditions. From 1944 to 1948, the leading causes of death in exile were: disease, malnutrition (and even famine), lack of elementary supplies (like clothing or shoes) and absence of medical care. Hard winters carried off the most weakened special settlers. Many had to spend the freezing months in small makeshift shelters that they themselves had built. (Dzhurgaev, 1989).

                Finally, despite incomplete and imprecise figures, the death toll among Chechens is one of the higher ever reached. A study based on the NKVD documents and demographic projections estimates that about 30% of the Chechens died between 1944 and 1952 (Ediev, 2003). In the same period, it shows that the demographic loss (deaths plus birth deficit) represents 54.3 %. According to Chechen historians, the death rate rose up to 50% during the journey and the first years of exile. This estimate does not rely on any scientific study, nor on any census, but on an approximation based on impressions and testimonies. It pertains to a larger strategy of victimization, and has a strong social resonance since the victims’ testimonies were basically the only ones that recount the deportation and exile during the late Soviet period.

                • Wow. That’s a pretty impressive output, Robert. Maybe that’s part of the problem; your posts are so long that you can’t remember what you said. And I can see that happening, since you apparently write it all yourself instead of just copying and pasting huge blocks of text, as Georg often seems to favour. I commend you for your devotion to the subject, and your obvious sincerity.

                  We’ll forget the high on drugs, drunk part, since that’s unseemly speech from a gentleman, which I’m giving you the benefit of the doubt as being. We’ll just put that down to excitement, or cyanosis or something.

                  I’d like to draw your attention to the last words of the comment previous, the one to which I replied. See those letters there at the end, where it says “BBC” in “…the “persecuted” Chechen magazine “has demonstrated a surprising level of boldness and self-sacrifice,” as written by the Russian Service of the BBC TV Company”? That’d be the BBC, the British Broadcasting Corporation. If you go here

                  http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2009/08_august/17/bloggers.shtml

                  you’ll see that the Caucasian Knot report is a joint effort with the Russian division of the BBC.

                  As to who I mean when I say they shouldn’t be allowed to rewrite history, I meant the Chechens, of course. The only reason I mention them is because this blog is all about hatred of Russia and everything Russian, and there is almost never a balancing argument offered. That brings up a second part of the problem, not necessarily restricted to you. Whenever anyone mentions an atrocity committed by a nation or agency that is not Russian, the immediate reaction seems to be to run a frantic google search for something that killed a larger number of people, but was done by the Russians. The reply doesn’t even begin, “Yes, that’s true, but…” It just launches into an account of what the Russians did, as if the last incident mentioned never even happened. You’re not making your case by simply citing a bigger atrocity, because there was never even an admission the former one was bad; it’s just an effort to get the topic back into your own comfort zone.

                  Beslan was a remarkable atrocity because it was carried out by people who were – by anyone’s definition – terrorists, against defenseless women and children who appear to have been selected for their vulnerability and for the anguish their situation would generate. There is no sympathy for terrorists (except, apparently, here) and the entire race or religion that spawned the terrorists is often tarred with the same brush (think “Muslim”). That’s an attitude this blog vigorously promotes.

                  As to your contention that there are inconsistencies in the Beslan account, the author of the piece won the 2007 Michael Kelly Award for journalism, exemplifying a reporter’s pursuit of the truth.

                  http://www.esquire.com/features
                  /chivers042007

                  It’s true that internet accounts of disasters are often full of inconsistencies, but you should be careful not to simply believe whichever version sounds better to you. You’re not encouraged to do any impartial research if you get all your views from this blog – which regularly substantiates its “truth” with impeccable references like this one;

                  “You should realize, however, that our opinion about the poster is shared BY A PERSON WHO LIVES IN RUSSIA AND WHO IS RUSSIAN” (taken from the comments following the editorial on the allegedly “racist” poster.)

                  Boy, can’t argue with references like those.

                  • @ See those letters there at the end, where it says “BBC” in “…the “persecuted” Chechen magazine “has demonstrated a surprising level of boldness and self-sacrifice,” as written by the Russian Service of the BBC TV Company”?

                    Oh you silly idiot,

                    According to Jean-Francois Julliard, secretary general of the “Reporters Without Borders”, the “persecuted” Chechen magazine “has demonstrated a surprising level of boldness and self-sacrifice,” as written by the Russian Service of the BBC TV Company.

                    they cited the secretary general of Reporters Without Borders – via BBC citation. Citation. Do you know what is this? Try a dictionary.

                    Once again,

                    Reporters Sans Frontières =/= “the BBC”.

                    And here is straight from RSF:

                    Reporters Without Borders provided funding on 10 April for the Chechen independent magazine Dosh, which covers current affairs in Chechnya and the five other republics in the Russian Caucasus. The magazine’s editors were forced to relocate from the Chechen capital of Grozny to Moscow for safety reasons but, despite threats and reprisals, have never stopped covering the region with the help of their correspondents in the field. Copies of the magazine in Russian and English are available at Reporters Without Borders headquarters in Paris.
                    http://www.rsf.org/Reporters-Without-Borders-provided.html

                    The 2009 Reporters Without Borders – Fnac Press Freedom Prize was awarded today to Israeli newspaper reporter Amira Hass and the Chechen quarterly Dosh at a ceremony hosted by journalist Bernard de La Villardière at the Espace Fondation EDF in Paris.
                    (…)
                    Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Jean-François Julliard said: “This year we are honouring a courageous journalist, Amira Hass, and a beleaguered news media, Dosh. Both, in different terrains, have displayed a remarkable degree of boldness and abnegation.”
                    (…)
                    The Chechen magazine Dosh was awarded the prize in the Media category for its fight for the right to inform and be informed. Dosh has been covering politics and current affairs in Chechnya and other parts of the Russian Caucasus since 2003, continuing to operate against all odds in a region where media independence has never been welcome.

                    The prize was received by Dosh editors Israpil Shavkhalov and Abdulkhazhi Duduyev. “We are not heroes, just independent journalists but that means being considered enemies of the motherland,” Shavkhalov said. “This prize gives us the strength to continue working and covering what is going on in the North Caucasus.”

                    Shavkhalov added with emotion: “We think today of the people with whom we should have been celebrating this prize – Magomed Yevloyev, Natalia Estemirova and Anna Politkovskaya.”
                    http://www.rsf.org/Press-freedom-prize-awarded-to.html

                    @As to who I mean when I say they shouldn’t be allowed to rewrite history, I meant the Chechens, of course.

                    Ah. So, “the Chechens” (North Caucasians) have no right to free press, and any other information than the government lies. Right? And so SHOULD be kidnapped?

                    Tell me more about this “rewriting history” by the editors of Dosh. What did they “rewrite”? I guess something about Beslan? Please cite them, because you apparently know something I don’t know. Maybe they didn’t agree with a constantly repeated version there were only 354 hostages taken (and not more than 1,100 ), as repeatedly lied by this little sly bastard spokesman of “the government” (read: Russian mafia) in the video I provided – even as the hostages’ mothers (Russian newspeak: “extremists”) were literally shouting at him, and holding signs saying it’s at least 800 people? Or was it something else? Maybe that the demands were actually issued by hostage takers, again the government lies from the video above (“no demands”)? I don’t know, you tell me. Come on. I’m really curious now. May be in Russian. Just show me.

                  • @Whenever anyone mentions an atrocity committed by a nation or agency that is not Russian, the immediate reaction seems to be to run a frantic google search for something that killed a larger number of people, but was done by the Russians. (…) Beslan was a remarkable atrocity because it was carried out by people who were – by anyone’s definition – terrorists, against defenseless women and children who appear to have been selected for their vulnerability and for the anguish their situation would generate.

                    In an apparently un-remarkable atrocity, on 23 February 1944, a large group (120,000) of terrorists sent from Moscow kidnapped all Chechen and Ingush defenseless women and children in the just-abolished republic of Checheno-Ingushetia.

                    I mean, ALL of them. Literally. It’s like if one day someone came and kidnapped all of ethnic Russian children in Russia. No hyperbole, this is just what happened.

                    And then most of their children died. In their tens of thousands. Mostly from hunger and cold, but some from other means, like being locked-up and burned alive, because it was easier this way. Or, in the case of many women and girls, when they bladders ruptured.

                    And many were not even buried at all – just thrown out of the wagons at the stops. And back in their homeland, which ceased to be theirs, their cemetaries were obliterated, like all the other remnants of their existance as the nation – including eraisng all mentions of them in the history books. “Down the memory hole.” Their own books were not censored, they were just collected from all the now-vacant homes and libraries and burned in a huge pyre on the central square of Grozny. People were burned, so why not their books.

                    But don’t worry, I’m now just “rewriting history” here. Of course. Beslan was remarkable, because the Muslims were kidnappers. Slava Rassiyi. Death to the monkeys.

                    • All right. I guess I don’t know what you’re talking about. The BBC thing is confusing me – if the BBC had nothing to do with it, why are they mentioned? In that context, no; I don’t know what a citation means.

                      The line that raised my hackles was the one about the Russian mass media distorting stories from the region so that people would get a negative opinion of Chechens. My argument was that Chechens deserved a negative opinion because of Beslan.

                      I understand who Reporters Without Borders are, the journalistic equivalent of Doctors Without Borders. Perhaps I was rude regarding Abdullah Duduev’s risk-taking in order to get the news out; if so, I apologize, and agree he richly deserves the prize.

                      I’m afraid I still don’t see the relationship between events that happened in 1944 and Beslan. I completely understand the Chechens have a deep-seated hatred of Russia, and there seems little doubt it’s justified. Still, however, that does not (a) justify murdering children, and (b) justify a hatred of all Russians living for what Russians now dead did. Those are the things I have a problem with. Although I hesitate to mention Israel because it’s such a lightning rod for accusation of bias against it, it seems to me the Balfour Declaration pushed Arabs off their lands against their will and created a deep-seated resentment. Nonetheless, pity for those who lost their lands and their history owing to a decision made by faraway politicians seems to be in short supply.

                      If it’s OK to get even more than 65 years after the fact, then Americans are never going to dare to turn their backs on Vietnam. Or African -Americans. Or Iraq. The Japanese will have to fear always a reprisal from the Chinese for the rape of Nanking. There’s hardly a nation on the planet who hasn’t done something horrible to someone else, and it doesn’t seem right that every member of their race or nationality should share the blame for things that happened before they were born.

                      I’ve never heard a Russian person refer to Chechens as “monkeys”. They refer to everyone from the North as “Chukchi” (Northerners) for the purpose of telling jokes about them, similar to the jokes we tell about Newfoundlanders. That doesn’t mean we hate Newfoundlanders, and want to stamp them out. I’m not suggesting there’s no prejudice at all against Chechens – just that I’ve never heard it in my association with quite a large cross-section of Russians.

                    • Mark,

                      You are absolutely right in pretty much everything you write.

                      And when Robert or Andrew complain about name-calling that some Russian extremists may have used towards Chechens – well, just look at your own experience here. You came here as a mature adult, trying to engage in reasoned logical discussion. In return, Andrew and Robert have been swearing like crazy at you. And you have done nothing wrong whatsoever.

                      Speaking of “monkeys”, the blog owner here, constantly swears at all russophiles here and calls us “apes”. I an provide dozens if not hundreds of quotes.

                      In fact, almost all russophobes in this blog – Les, Georg, Elmer, Bohdan, Vorobey – constantly use swear words as arguments against those whose words they don’t like. And they don’t even see themselves as extremists.

            • No Mark, you are not just slow, you are a complete idiot.

              I really do suggest you get an education regarding Russian crimes in the Caucasus in general, and in Chechnya and Georgia in particular.

  5. shevchuk’s the MAN. and its not like the kremlin can say he’s a puppet or a tool of the West, you know—-russians just won’t buy it–they know him too well.
    he’s VERY respected and adored by all age groups—-from the young to the over 50s—-the closest thing to shevchuk in the u.s. is probably Springsteen—-and even the boss doesn’t come close to shevchuk’s status in russia.

  6. This is excellent news. I’m a fan of Russian heavy metal music, namely Aria, and it’s nice to see Russian artists are fighting for Russia’s cause too. I also like the tone of the article, particularly the cold and factual conclusion. It’s refreshing when compared with some other articles with a bit too much emotional charge.

  7. Isn’t it a good sample proving the civil society in Russia exists?
    Shevchuk is still well and alive (while his guitar gently weeps) to the best of my knowledge.

    • Personal thanks to Putin that he is still alive. This is so kind of you. Can you please keep him alive for another couple of years? Please please.

      • Yes, we’ll keep him alive for other over thirty years, and the reports of bloody KGB agents to him in some 30 years will sound like this: “everything is quiet at the US-Russia borders in Nevada and around Mississippi River”.

        • I am not from US and I don’t care much about your “elektrichka” sence of humor. You seem to care about US much more than about Russia, it’s a shame you won’t fit anywhere except elektrichka.

          • “elektrichka” sence of humor”

            There is no the “elektrichka” “sence” of humor, pedrila, only the “kazarma” one. But I’m quite serious. Booo!

        • ““everything is quiet at the US-Russia borders in Nevada and around Mississippi River”.”

          this is just hijacked joke and sounds retarded, cause idea is so ridiculous. The version about border between Finland and China somewhere in Urals is more funny, cause prospect of that happening is more real.

  8. @Andrew, Good news…for Chechens Ukrainians, and all of Rashias suffering Neighbors. More Mascal blood shed! Mascali bandits now slaughtering cops, and on the Kremlins doorstep. Cops beat up elderly music professor, this week in Yekaterinburg, so it now happens to nice group of “people”.

    Moscow policeman shot dead after pulling over car Today at 17:02 | Associated Press
    MOSCOW (AP) — Russian investigators say a policeman has been shot dead and his colleague wounded after they pulled over a car and one of the three men inside opened fire.

    A statement posted Saturday on the Investigative Committee’s Web site describes the suspects as appearing to be from Russia’s southern North Caucasus region.

    The statement says the officers, members of a rapid-reaction force, stopped a black BMW that had no licence plate in western Moscow early Saturday. One of the three inside produced a gun, shooting one officer dead and critically injuring the other with shots to the head and stomach.

    Russian news agencies say the suspects remain at large. Such clashes are regular events in the North Caucasus regions of Chechnya, Dagestan and Ingushetia, but relatively rare in Moscow.

    I hope this is a new trend in Maskovia. Do not forget that these were the , members of a rapid-reaction force, and killers with badges.

    • Yes, that sort of attitude really gives you the moral high ground when you try to squeeze out a tear as you’re talking about all the poor Ukrainians and other ethnic groups slaughtered by Russians. The dead wouldn’t thank you for your remarks, Georg, because you take away any dignity their deaths might have possessed.

  9. Mark, you could lecture me on morals? Kremlin minions slaughter innocents and you start lying for your Kremlin masters. Filth like you speaking about genocidal acts toward your neighbors that is still going on.

    Thugs and Siloviki who call themselves a “rapid reaction force” getting wiped out honors the memory of our dead, and the ones being killed today.

    Toadies lying like you Mark and those who do the bidding of the Kremlin can not be safe anywhere.

    Putin caries out assassinations, so your ilk is not immune. But most likely it was just Rashan criminals like ilk for now. Blaming Chechens is too late. The world knows RaSSiyan lies.

  10. There are no genocidal acts going on against my neighbours. And what I suggested was that you don’t look much like an object of pity or sympathy when you delight in someone else’s violent death. Especially when you announce it as “good news”. Makes you sound a little ghoulish.

    But since we’re talking about Putin and assassination, aren’t you a little worried he’ll come and whack you? After all, he supposedly kills all his enemies.

    And yes, I could lecture you on morals. I’ve never killed anyone, never advocated for someone to be killed or promoted hatred of an entire nationality because of the sins of a few. You do it on a daily basis, and you don’t see anything wrong with it, you delight in it. It seems to be the only thing that gives your life purpose.

    • I guess you missed the Russian army and its sidekicks doing another one of their periodic bouts of ethnic cleansing (a form of genocide) against ethnic Georgians in August 2008?

      Really Mark, you are a bit of a two faced hypocrite.

  11. @I’m afraid I still don’t see the relationship between events that happened in 1944 and Beslan.

    In 1944, an enormous horde of 120,000 Soviet terrorists (under the orders of Moscow) kidnapped exactly all of Chechen and Ingush children and women. (No exceptions, even for the Communist Party officials – they just went in a passenger train, and not in a cattle train.) Then most of them (tens of thousands) died in captivity.

    In 2004, a small band of 50 or so local North Ossetian terrorists (including one Ossetian, but even a Russian Korean, two Arabs, etc) kidnapped also less than one (1) thousand mostly Ossetian children, then a minority (less 200) died in captivity.

    You think the latter was “a remarkable atrocity”, yet not the former, which was worse by an order of magnitude.

    You think all Chechens (why Chechens and not Ingush and others?) should be hated for Beslan. And then you tell all Russians should not be hated for Beslan. I tell you something. I don’t hate all Russians for Beslan. I hate the men who first kept lying while preparing the bloodbath, and then gave the order to open fire (from tanks, rocket flomethrowers, etc). I don’t hate people like Politkovskaya, who was poisoned on the way to Beslan. Or the mothers of Beslan (“extremists”). Or the ordinary Russians, even if they were just brianwashed.

    That’s all.

    • @ local North Ossetian

      Local North Caucasian, of course. Among the hostage takers only Vladimir Khodov (the double agent) and one of the Ingush were from North Ossetia.

    • That’s all I was looking for. It’s unreasonable to hate an entire group for what a few did. I don’t know what the population of Russia was in 1944 – I daresay I could find out, but I don’t need to look to know it was more than 120,000. Now it’s something like 148 Million, but not all of them are interested in subjugating their neighbours and killing other people’s children.

      I didn’t know anything about the incident you describe in 2004 – I didn’t really follow Caucasian/Russian politics much before I visited this blog. It most certainly is an atrocity, and I will learn more about it. I said that IF it was OK to hate all Russians for what some do, then that standard should be applied to all. That’s not my natural instinct, and I’m glad it’s not yours, either.

      • @I didn’t know anything about the incident you describe in 2004

        Alright. Maybe I’ll tell you more. So, this school #1 in Beslan, it was there for a pretty long time (during the 2004 summer vacations it got renovated, this was also when the “repair workers” hid a cache of weapons there). It was there also in 1992.

        And in 1992 eastern North Ossetia experienced a short (one week) but heated (“heated” as in: guns blazing) ethnic conflict between the local Ingush and the Ossetians. Its source had been the 1994 deportation, because it was when part of abolished (and almost completely depopulated) Checheno-Ingushetia was given to the Soviet republic of Ossetia – this land is now called “Prigorodny District of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania” (it used to always be Ingush, well before there was any Russian nation the Vainakhs were already there – actually for thousands of years!). Tens of thousands of surviving Ingush returned there after 1957, but they found strangers living in their homes, but they bought them back. In 1992 the tension got hot, but the Russians (as in: Russian federal forces) took the side of Ossetian authorities, and soon hundreds of the Ingush were killed (the Ossetian side lost only a few dozen people) and most of the rest were focibly expelled (more than 60,000, and most are still displaced). From their historical homeland.

        (Ossetians are pretty good at ethnic cleansing after the Russians win a conflict for them, this also happened in 2008 in Georgian villages in what Russia says is now “independent South Ossetia”.)

        So, why am I talking about this in the context of the school in Beslan, just north of Prigorodny? Because it was one of the places where the Ossetian police and militias kept the Ingush civilian hostages in 1992. Yes, including women and children. Several men were singled-out and separated from their families, and they were not seen since . They “dissappeared”, like many others in the conflict. But the Russians were on their (the captors’) side, so they didnt fire on this school, and there was no massacre – this time.

        But hey, of course I’m just “rewriting history” here. There were never any hostages in this school before the “354” hostages were taken in 2004, the Russians and Ossetians did not provoke the Ingush with any injustice and large-scale atrocities (and what Ingush, it was “Chechens” anyway!), and the Chechens have no right to free press and should be kidnapped if they think otherwise. So don’t worry and instead keep reading the “true” history like http://www.islam-watch.org/Others/Sexual-Terror-Untold-Stories-of-Beslan-Jihad.htm (I think this might be my personal favourite: a kind of more kinky version of blood libel tale, this time with less Jews yet still starring circumcised people).

  12. Robert wrote: “Of course. Beslan was remarkable, because the Muslims were kidnappers.

    Well, I don’t think this is the first time in history that Muslim terrorists took hostages, Robert. This is especially true about Chechnya, which turned into one huge lawless kidnappers’ paradise after its their victory over Russia in 1996 and stayed that way until Putin sent troops there in 2000. You may, as always, think that the readers here are too stupid to remember, but here are some incidents of Muslim hostage-taking and kidnappings that pop to my mind (I apologize in advance to the readers in Israel, India and all other countries that have been constant targets of Muslim terrorism, for only skimming the surface here:

    http://history1900s.about.com/od/famouscrimesscandals/p/munichmassacre.htm

    The Munich Massacre was a terrorist attack during the 1972 Olympic Games. Eight Palestinian terrorists killed two members of the Israeli Olympic team and then took nine others hostage.

    http://www.jimmycarterlibrary.org/documents/hostages.phtml

    The Hostage Crisis in Iran

    On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in Tehran and took approximately seventy Americans captive… lasted 444 days.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moscow_theater_hostage_crisis

    Moscow theater hostage crisis

    The Moscow theatre hostage crisis, also known as the 2002 Nord-Ost siege,[1] was the seizure of a crowded Moscow theatre on October 23, 2002 by about 40-50 armed Chechens who claimed allegiance to the Islamist militant separatist movement in Chechnya. They took 850 hostages

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/2357109.stm

    Chechen rebels’ hostage history

    From kidnapping aid workers, journalists and businessmen to seizing hospitals and a Moscow theatre, Chechen rebels have become notorious as hostage-takers.

    They have often used civilians to draw international attention to their demands for independence from Russia, ratchet up pressure on Moscow – and at times simply to extract hefty ransoms.

    The first major hostage drama took place just six months after Russian forces marched into the breakaway republic of Chechnya at the end of 1994 to prevent its secession.

    A group of gunmen herded hundreds of civilians into a hospital in the southern Russian town of Budyonnovsk.

    When militants staged a similar attack six months later in January 1996, they appeared to have Dzhokhar Dudayev’s backing. This time some 250 militants led by rebel leader Salman Raduyev held up to 3,000 people in a hospital in the Dagestani town of Kizlyar.

    Pro-Chechen gunmen hijacked a Black Sea passenger ferry. The gunmen threatened to blow up the ship – and the 255 hostages on it

    After the first Chechen war ended in 1996, the province descended into lawlessness, and kidnappings became rife as rebel warlords fell out with Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov. Victims included British aid workers Jon James and Camilla Carr, who were freed in September 1998 after a year in captivity, and four engineers who were kidnapped but later found beheaded. Herbert Gregg, an American missionary held hostage for seven months

    In 1998 security firm Kroll Associates UK said that there were about 100 expatriates being held hostage in the region.

    Three people were killed when Saudi Arabian security forces stormed a plane which was diverted to Medina after it was hijacked as it flew from Istanbul to Moscow in March 2001.

    A week later, several pro-Chechen gunmen seized about 120 tourists at a luxury Istanbul hotel in protest against the war.

    In July 2001, up to 30 people were held in searing heat on a bus in southern Russia by a Chechen man demanding the release of five Chechens who had been captured in a previous hijacking.

    And in May 2002, a lone gunman held about 10 people hostage – again at an Istanbul hotel. They were all released unharmed.

    http://www.ldc.upenn.edu/Projects/TDT3/topic.research/topic3056.html

    Chechnya Rebel Kidnapping and Beheading

    July 1997 British aid workers Camilla Carr and Jon James, who worked for a Russian organization called the Center for Peacemaking and Community Development, are seized in Grozny by half a dozen masked people.

    08.03.1997 Four French aid workers are kidnapped from Dagestan, neighboring Chechnya. Reports say they were taken to Chechnya… it was not clear whether a ransom was paid.

    Sept. 1997 Lithuanian businessman Viktoras Grodis is kidnapped, and a $100,000 ransom is demanded. His whereabouts are still unknown.

    Sept. 1997 A Turkish businessman is kidnapped in Chechnya.

    10.23.1997 Two Hungarian aid workers are kidnapped

    11.04.1997 Swiss engineer Peter Zollinger, is kidnapped and taken to Chechnya. He is released on June 21, 1998, after a ransom of as much a half a million dollars is paid.

    12.17.1997 Kidnappers seize five Polish volunteer aid workers who were delivering medicine, food and other supplies. The criminals demand $3 million in ransom.

    01.08.1998 Two Swedish missionaries, Daniel and Paulina Brolin, who work for the Pentecostal church, are kidnapped from Dagestan. They are held for half a year in an unheated cellar in Chechnya

    01.29.1998 Frenchman Vincent Cochetel, a staffer for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in North Ossetia, is kidnapped from Vladikavkaz reportedly by a gang operating from Chechnya.

    05.01.1998 President Boris Yeltsin’s personal envoy to the region, Valentin Vlasov, is kidnapped, and Chechen officials say as much as $7 million in ransom is demanded.

    09.29.1998 Akmal Saidov, head of the social and economic department of the Russian government’s representative office in Chechnya, is kidnapped after attending a speech by the Chechen president on the problem of kidnapping. His body is found on October 3.

    10.03.1998 About 20 gunmen seize three Britons, Darren Hickey, Rudolf Petschi and Peter Kennedy and a New Zealander, Stanley Shaw, after a shoot-out with their bodyguards. The four were engineers working for the British telecommunications company Granger Telecom.

    11.12.1998 U.S. citizen Herbert Gregg, who did charitable work in the neighbouring region of Dagestan, is kidnapped upon leaving a local orphanage.

    12.08.1998 Chechen authorities find the decapitated heads of the four foreigners near Grozny, Chechnya’s capital. Their bodies are not found.

    12.10.1998 Mansur Tagirov, Chechnya’s top prosecutor investigating the killings, is abducted.

    12.12.1998 French U.N. official Vincent Cochetel is freed during a raid by Russian commandos in Ingushetia and flown to Moscow.

    12.14.1998 Chechnya’s parliament hampers President Maskhadov’s plans to stop rampant crime by declaring that he cannot use army reserves to fight internal lawlessness.

    12.15.1998 Chechen parliament declares 30-day state of emergency in response to mounting crime.

    The head of the Chechen Gazprom gas company was kidnapped in Grozny.

    12.25.1998 A Christmas present to the families of the four foreigners found decapitated: their bodies were found and flown to London.
    ……………………

    So, maybe Beslan was not as “remarkable” as you want the zombie readers to believe, Robert?

    • Rasha goes into a Muslim Country, and does what it does to Christians. Then expects to be forgiven with an act of Contrition, or the turning of the other cheek? Life is harsh for all.

      Rashan crimes are far worse then Muslims, which and can be forgiven for taking it out on Kremlin pigs interests or personnel.

      Mascals commit genocide and expect their lies to be believed because they repeat them like a mantra, like here on LaRussophobe.

      Maskali are making themselves targets of hatred, and retribution anyplace, anywhere. Nobody feels sorry, that knows Rashans, just ask all their neighbors in NATO.

      Anyone connected to Maskals are fair game, since Murdering Maskals do not even respect the lives of their own people. Can’t understand why NeoBolshevik RaSSiyan’s offspring should wind up on a pitchfork in a dung pile,♠ where they belong? Have more vodka.

      • Would you care for some cheese with that venom? I’m glad you’re not in the government. Your country would soon be locked in a hopeless war with Russia. When you get to the point that you don’t care who you hurt, you’re past the point of reason.

        When wars are fought so that the old get killed before the young, the young people will soon put a stop to it.

        • Mark you bring up Cheese. So like you rotten attitude decorated with a Mantra of Lies.

          There will be no accommodation of evil, since it gets stronger. Already you threaten the nameless country with war.

          Typical Rashan Savok trash like you are denying the problems of a mafia enterprise that murdered its way to the top, and threatens all civilized people, except the moskal trash like you that feed the system. So much for your “reason” you Kremlin loving scumsucker.

        • Mark you bring up Cheese. So like you rotten attitude decorated with a Mantra of Lies.

          There will be no accommodation of evil, since it gets stronger. Already you threaten the nameless country with war.

          Typical Rashan Savok trash like you are denying the problems of a mafia enterprise that murdered its way to the top, and threatens all civilized people, except the moskal trash like you that feed the system. So much for your “reason” you Kremlin loving scumlord.

        • Mark you bring up Cheese. So like you rotten attitude decorated with a Mantra of Lies.

          There will be no accommodation of evil, since it gets stronger. Already you threaten the nameless country with war.

          Typical Rashan Savok like you are denying the problems of a mafia enterprise that murdered its way to the top, and threatens all civilized people, except the moskal trash like you that feed the system. So much for your “reason” you Kremlin loving scumlord.

        • Mark you bring up Cheese. So like you rotten attitude decorated with a Mantra of Lies.

          There will be no accommodation of evil, since it gets stronger. Already you threaten the nameless country with war.

          Typical Rashan Savok like you are denying the problems of a mafia enterprise that murdered its way to the top, and threatens all civilized people, except the moskal trash like you that feed the system. So much for your “reasoning”.

        • Mark you bring up Cheese. So like you rotten attitude decorated with a Mantra of Lies.

          There will be no accommodation of evil, since it gets stronger. Already you threaten the nameless country with war.

          Typical Rooso-Savok like you are denying the problems of a mafia enterprise that murdered its way to the top, and threatens all civilized people, except the moskal trash like you that feed the system. So much for your “reasoning”.

        • Mark you bring up Cheese. So like you rotten attitude decorated with a Mantra of Lies.

          There will be no accommodation of evil, since it gets stronger. Already you threaten the nameless country with war. You @Mark denying problems of a mafia enterprise, that murdered its way to the top, and threatens even Russian civilized people, all except the running dogs like you that feed the system. So much for your “reasoning”.

        • Mark,

          You bring up Cheese. So like you rotten attitude, decorating your mantra with Lies.

          There will be no accommodation of evil, since it gets stronger. Already you threaten the nameless country with war.

          You @Mark denying problems of a mafia enterprise, that murdered its way to the top, and threatens even Russian civilized people, except the running dogs that feed the system. So much for your “reasoning”.

    • Thanks for your support, RTR, I appreciate a reasonable voice among the vitriol. However, I wouldn’t write Robert off too soon. He seems well-educated, intimately familiar with the history (he knows more of it than I do, anyway) and sincere in his demand to be understood.

      • Mark,

        I wish you luck in trying to reason with Robert. However, with time you will discover that this is a Sisyphean task. While Robert is very knowledgeable on some areas of history, he:

        a) lacks reading comprehension
        b) has a warped perception that almost everything that Muslims do is good
        c) demagogically manipulates historical facts to fit his agenda
        d) will never admit that anything he said was wrong
        e) will insult you personally in the process

        Good luck!

    • @This is especially true about Chechnya, which turned into one huge lawless kidnappers’ paradise after its their victory over Russia in 1996 and stayed that way until Putin sent troops there in 2000.

      In “one huge lawless kidnappers’ paradise” there were about 2,000 or so kidnappings in 3 years (many of them actually not in Chechnya, but by Dagestani gangs and so on).

      This was after the Russians completely destroyed the country and no one came to aid, and you had plenty of hardened former guerrillas with literally nothing to do, often not even homes to return to, so no wonder many of them turned to banditry. (Among them were the future “Heroes of Russia” – the notorious Yamadayev brothers, and many other of the courent “Chechen law enforcement officers” and “government officials”.)

      But after “Putin sent troops there in 2000”, there were tens of thousands of kidnappings.

      5,000 of people still remain missing (“missing” as in: murdered, but their bodies concealed in mass graves or destroyed). A recent PW article on the announced Russian “special team for the search” of the disappeared:

      http://www.watchdog.cz/?show=000000-000024-000002-000046&lang=1

      Thousands others were killed but then found and identified, and thousands are crippled for life after being severely tortured.

      And of course, Moscow regime-controlled forces kidnapped ALL of Chechens (and the Ingush) in Russia in 1944. I mean 100% of them, except of the serving soldiers (who had no idea what is happening with their families), and a handful of men who fled to the mountains (the last one of them was killed in 1978). The Soviets abducted the entire Vainakh nation in one day- even as the Nazis didn’t manage to do this with the Jews for years! And then, they killed up to half of them.

      @So, maybe Beslan was not as “remarkable” as you want the zombie readers to believe, Robert?

      So, maybe Beslan was really not as “remarkable” as you Putinite zombies want to believe.

  13. Robert wrote: “In “one huge lawless kidnappers’ paradise” there were about 2,000 or so kidnappings in 3 years (many of them actually not in Chechnya, but by Dagestani gangs and so on). So, maybe Beslan was really not as “remarkable” as you Putinite zombies want to believe.

    You are probably right: Beslan is quite in line with the mentality of Muslim extremists and criminals.

  14. @You are probably right: Beslan is quite in line with the mentality of Muslim extremists and criminals.

    Ah, “with the mentality of Muslim extremists”. Let’s check “the mentality of Christian extremists” and compare!

    @The Munich Massacre was a terrorist attack during the 1972 Olympic Games. Eight Palestinian terrorists killed two members of the Israeli Olympic team and then took nine others hostage.

    Konzentrazionlager Dachau near Munich was a terrorist attack during the 1936 Olympic Games in Germany and actually between 1933 and 1945 in Germany. The German terrorists killed A LOT of Jews and then over 100,000 of them at Dachau for years. Many of them died, but their deaths were actually not because of a botched German police action. (Because the German police at the time were terrorists too.)

    So I guess the mentality of the Christian extremists might be worse after all.

    Oh, and it’s also interesting to note the said “Palestinian terrorists” were supported by Moscow. During the Israeli response, they (“unfortunately”) even killed a KGB agent:

    After receiving reliable information on Muchassi from Le Group, Avner’s team made a unilateral decision to include him in their mission. The team decided that if Abad al-Chir had been selected as a target, it was reasonable to believe that his replacement was also a viable target. The Mossad always taught its officers to use initiative and make reasonable decisions in the field. Avner’s team had acquired the information required for an operation targeting Muchassi and had the opportunity and the means. Unfortunately, during this operation, Avner’s team encountered Muchassi’s KGB contact officer in a vehicle blocking the path of their escape. The team shot and killed the KGB officer after observing him reach for a weapon under his jacket.
    http://www.fas.org/irp/eprint/calahan.htm

    But of course, the KGB was (and is) a terrorist and criminal organization too. Used to be militant atheist, but it doesn’t matter.

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