Tag Archives: gorbachev

CARTOON: Of Russian Mice, and Men

Source:  Ellustrator.

Medvedev as the New Gorbachev?

Here’s an interesting bit of analysis from Reuters, suggesting that Dima Medvedev may be the new Gorbachev — something Russians will ever so delighted to hear. 

Something quite extraordinary is happening in Russia. Slowly but surely, the monolithic political system that has held together in Russia for most of the past decade is coming apart

Today, in an unprecedented step, deputies from all three of the opposition parties in the Russian parliament staged a walk-out, demanding a meeting with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev. They are protesting against the results of local elections that were held in various parts of Russia on 11 October. Not for the first time, the pro-government United Russia party largely swept the board, amid widespread allegations by the opposition of vote-rigging.

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EDITORIAL: We Told You So!

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EDITORIAL

We Told You So!

“The electoral system has been revised to serve the interests of a single party, the interests of those who are now at the helm. Step by step, we have been going back to the past.”

— former Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev, at a conference celebrating the 20th anniversary of the first Soviet parliament on May 21st

More than three years ago, we began warning the world about neo-Soviet Russia.  Long before Anna Politkovskaya was murdered, long before anyone ever heard of Dima Medvedev, we warned the world, on a daily basis, that Vladimir Putin would not leave power and would liquidate anyone who got in his way.  We were only stating the obvious — once a proud KGB spy, always a proud KGB spy.  You can’t teach an old spook new democracy.

Few would listen at first.  We were called chicken littles and worrywarts  for claiming that Russia could go back to the darkest days of the Soviet past.  But three years later, we are conventional wisdom. We even have to ask ourselves if we’re being too soft on Putin’s Russia, when the likes of Mikhail Gorbachev, who would know as well as anyone, states publicly and clearly that we were right all along.

And that’s exactly what he did last week.  He minced no words in stating the obvious, that Russia is a neo-Soviet state rapidly on its way to becoming a neo-Stalinist state. Not even Gorbachev, though, was brave enough to lay the blame for this situation where it belongs, at the feet of Putin and Medvedev.  He knows that if he did, he’d be inviting the Politkovskaya solution to be applied to him as well.

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Gorby Blasts Neo-Soviet United Russia

The BBC reports:

The last leader of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, has given some of his strongest criticism yet of the politics of modern Russia. He says the United Russia party of the current Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin, behaves like the old-style Communists. “I criticise United Russia a lot,” said Mr Gorbachev, “I do it directly.” He also said Russia’s judicial system was not properly constitutional and dismissed members of its parliament as not truly independent. “United Russia is a party of bureaucrats,” he said, in an interview with the American news organisation, Associated Press. “It is the worst version of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.” Mr Gorbachev was speaking as the countries of Eastern and Central Europe look towards the 20th anniversary this year of the fall of Communism in Europe, as symbolised by the smashing of the Berlin wall.

The BBC correspondent in Moscow, James Rodgers, says that although Mr Gorbachev is respected throughout the world for his role in ending the Cold War, many Russians more readily associate him with the economic hardship that accompanied the end of Communism. Mr Gorbachev himself now says he did not foresee that his policies of openness and reform – “glasnost” and “perestroika” – would lead to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. “I was a resolute opponent of the break-up,” he said, expressing the hope that one day Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus might again re-join Russia in a political union.