In Russia, like Puppet like Master

Human Rights Watch reports:

The Russian government should closely examine evidence gathered by the Austrian government which indicates the president of Chechnya, Ramzan Kadyrov, ordered the kidnapping last year of a Chechen refugee in Vienna, Human Rights Watch said today. The refugee, Umar Israilov, died as a result of gunshot wounds inflicted by his assailants.

On April 27, 2010, the Austrian prosecutor’s office announced that, following a year-long investigation into Israilov’s murder, the country’s federal counterterrorism agency had concluded that Israilov had been killed as a result of a botched kidnapping, which was allegedly ordered by Kadyrov. All three suspected kidnappers are in custody in Austria, awaiting indictment by the prosecutor’s office. Kadyrov has denied any involvement in the crime.

“Suspicions have been swirling around this case from the very beginning,” said Holly Cartner, Europe and Central Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “Now Austria has concluded a substantial investigation, with findings that deserve Russia’s most serious scrutiny – and response.”

Israilov, 27, was shot dead on January 13, 2009, as he left a grocery store in Vienna. In the years prior to his murder, he had stated publicly that he had been tortured by Kadyrov and had named Kadyrov in a case he had brought before the European Court of Human Rights.

An article that appeared in The New York Times immediately after the killing said that Israilov had been detained in 2003 in Chechnya as a rebel fighter, was amnestied, and then briefly served as a bodyguard for Kadyrov. The article cited an interview with Israilov in which he said that during his detention Kadyrov had tortured him, including using electric shocks. He was also quoted as saying that he had witnessed beating, kicking, and other torture of detainees by Kadyrov and his subordinates.

According to The New York Times, in 2008 Israilov said that “an emissary from Mr. Kadyrov had arranged meetings with him and demanded that he drop his legal complaints and return to Chechnya. The man threatened Mr. Israilov’s family.” Several days prior to the killing, Israilov complained to Austrian police authorities that he was being followed by unknown individuals.

“Umar Israilov directly accused the Chechen president of torture, and this seems to have made him a target,” Cartner said. “Sadly, this is only one of a number of killings of brave individuals who have spoken up about abuses in Chechnya that seem to have a clear political motivation.”

Human Rights Watch has documented persistent abuses, including ill-treatment and torture, by Chechen law enforcement and security agencies under the de facto control of Ramzan Kadyrov, who act with rampant impunity. Victims of rights violations and human rights defenders who seek to hold perpetrators to account have been threatened, abducted, and even killed.

On July 15 2009, the most prominent Chechen human rights activist, Natalia Estemirova, was abducted in Chechnya and murdered. Estemirova worked on some of the most sensitive human rights cases for the Memorial Human Rights Center. The circumstances of her murder, along with a pattern of threats against her, Memorial, and independent activists and journalists in Chechnya, all point to possible official involvement or acquiescence in her murder.

In August 2008, another alleged victim of torture in Chechnya, Mokhmadsalakh Masaev, was abducted in Chechnya several weeks after the publication of an interview in which he described his torture and illegal detention in a secret prison allegedly run by Kadyrov in his home village. To date, Masaev’s fate and whereabouts remain unknown.

“The conclusions reached by the Austrian Prosecutor’s office about Ramzan Kadyrov have turned the spotlight on his governance,” Cartner said. “They should prompt the Russian government to finally take the necessary steps to restore the rule of law in Chechnya.” The Russian government should closely examine evidence gathered by the Austrian government which indicates the president of Chechnya, Ramzan Kadyrov, ordered the kidnapping last year of a Chechen refugee in Vienna, Human Rights Watch said today. The refugee, Umar Israilov, died as a result of gunshot wounds inflicted by his assailants.

On April 27, 2010, the Austrian prosecutor’s office announced that, following a year-long investigation into Israilov’s murder, the country’s federal counterterrorism agency had concluded that Israilov had been killed as a result of a botched kidnapping, which was allegedly ordered by Kadyrov. All three suspected kidnappers are in custody in Austria, awaiting indictment by the prosecutor’s office. Kadyrov has denied any involvement in the crime.

“Suspicions have been swirling around this case from the very beginning,” said Holly Cartner, Europe and Central Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “Now Austria has concluded a substantial investigation, with findings that deserve Russia’s most serious scrutiny – and response.”

Israilov, 27, was shot dead on January 13, 2009, as he left a grocery store in Vienna. In the years prior to his murder, he had stated publicly that he had been tortured by Kadyrov and had named Kadyrov in a case he had brought before the European Court of Human Rights.

An article that appeared in The New York Times immediately after the killing said that Israilov had been detained in 2003 in Chechnya as a rebel fighter, was amnestied, and then briefly served as a bodyguard for Kadyrov. The article cited an interview with Israilov in which he said that during his detention Kadyrov had tortured him, including using electric shocks. He was also quoted as saying that he had witnessed beating, kicking, and other torture of detainees by Kadyrov and his subordinates.

According to The New York Times, in 2008 Israilov said that “an emissary from Mr. Kadyrov had arranged meetings with him and demanded that he drop his legal complaints and return to Chechnya. The man threatened Mr. Israilov’s family.” Several days prior to the killing, Israilov complained to Austrian police authorities that he was being followed by unknown individuals.

“Umar Israilov directly accused the Chechen president of torture, and this seems to have made him a target,” Cartner said. “Sadly, this is only one of a number of killings of brave individuals who have spoken up about abuses in Chechnya that seem to have a clear political motivation.”

Human Rights Watch has documented persistent abuses, including ill-treatment and torture, by Chechen law enforcement and security agencies under the de facto control of Ramzan Kadyrov, who act with rampant impunity. Victims of rights violations and human rights defenders who seek to hold perpetrators to account have been threatened, abducted, and even killed.

On July 15 2009, the most prominent Chechen human rights activist, Natalia Estemirova, was abducted in Chechnya and murdered. Estemirova worked on some of the most sensitive human rights cases for the Memorial Human Rights Center. The circumstances of her murder, along with a pattern of threats against her, Memorial, and independent activists and journalists in Chechnya, all point to possible official involvement or acquiescence in her murder.

In August 2008, another alleged victim of torture in Chechnya, Mokhmadsalakh Masaev, was abducted in Chechnya several weeks after the publication of an interview in which he described his torture and illegal detention in a secret prison allegedly run by Kadyrov in his home village. To date, Masaev’s fate and whereabouts remain unknown.

“The conclusions reached by the Austrian Prosecutor’s office about Ramzan Kadyrov have turned the spotlight on his governance,” Cartner said. “They should prompt the Russian government to finally take the necessary steps to restore the rule of law in Chechnya.”

41 responses to “In Russia, like Puppet like Master

  1. @The Russian government should closely examine evidence

    Calling for the criminals to prosecute themselves.

    I remember how in 2000 HRW was less naive:

    To the United Nations, OSCE, Council of Europe, European Union, United States, and other international actors:

    Representatives of various international organizations and governments, including the United Nations, the European Union, and the United States have repeatedly exhorted the Russian government to investigate abuses committed in Chechnya and to hold those responsible accountable. Although the Russian government had not undertaken a credible investigation, on April 25, 2000, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights failed to call for the creation of an international inquiry into the abuses, instead calling once again on the Russian government to conduct an investigation. More than one month later, the Russian government continues to make no meaningful progress on accountability for abuses in Chechnya. Accordingly, Human Rights Watch once again calls on representatives of the international community to:

    * Establish an international commission of inquiry that would observe, investigate, and report upon the human rights and humanitarian conditions relating to the military operation in Chechnya, and that have the ability to recommend prosecutions in appropriate cases.

    • And this:

      Until such an international commission is formed, with the ability to recommend prosecutions, there remains little likelihood of the guilty ever being punished.
      http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/country,,HRW,,RUS,,3ae6a8708,0.html

      I guess it would be quite a sight if such an international commission “recommended prosecution” of the chief criminal (Putin) to the “Russian government”. Or maybe rather an international wanted warrant like this for Gen. al-Bashir of Sudan? (Of course, this is sadly impossible in the current “realpolitik” situation.)

      @restore the rule of law in Chechnya

      Pre-Kadyrov Chechnya? The “rule of law” such as in the link above (about a horrific massacre by a bunch of drunk Russian OMON “law enforcers”)?

      @and then briefly served as a bodyguard for Kadyrov.

      He then served as a mid-level “police” commander.

  2. Yet another sob story?
    ‘A good terrorist is a bad terrorist, no matter where he or she was shot.’ — Mossad (C)

    The problem is some call them rebels and freedom fighters like ‘American Committee for Peace in the Caucasus’ with its Freedom House feeding traugh.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2004/sep/08/usa.russia/print

    • The guy was a Russian police officer (in charge of a company, if I remember correctly). But you’re right “Russian police” are terrorists.

      Also your link to The American Committee for Peace in the Caucasus is incorrect.The correct one is here:

      http://www.peaceinthecaucasus.org/

      • You’re welcome to accept the Caucasus Jamaate and all it’s representatives in your country, give them a region to practice sharia and have four wives.

  3. Correction!
    ‘A good terrorist is a dead terrorist, no matter where he or she was shot.’ — Mossad (C)

    • You just invented this “quote”.

      Also for Israel “a good terrorist” is the one who agrees to negotiate (like Arafat did eventually, even sharing the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize with Peres and Rabin). So much for “we don’t negotiate with terrorists”, which was an actual quote but long-time outdated.

      And for Russia, “a good terrorist” (even a “Hero of Russia terrorist”, several of them) is one who changes sides for money.

  4. Voice of Reason

    The Chechen society, like the societies of many other Muslim people, needs to graduate from the 11th century mentality to the 21st century.

    • And for this they must cut all their ties with Russia, rid of their Russian puppets, and revert to building democracy, this time with international help.

      • Very true Robert.

        It is the Russians who propagate Islamic fundamentalism in the North Caucasus.

        The original Chechen separatists were trying to build an independent secular state.

      • “and revert to building democracy” they did actually build it, haven’t you heard about the 1996-1999 Ichkeriya?

        “The original Chechen separatists were trying to build an independent secular state.” – and they created it at last. Now their successors are continuing their cause building Caucasus emirate.

        Hopefully they would consider Georgia a part of it too some day – you deserve the happiness of living up to Islam, yet-a-kafir Andrew.

    • And they were actually Christian until quite recently, they were Christianised by the Georgians around the 8th century, Moslem groups appeared in the 16th century and became a large minority, but when they encountered the Russians in the late 18th and early 19th centuries they could secure no aid from Europe, many more converted to Islam in an attempt to gain military aid from Persia and Turkey, however when Mansur Ushurma tried to create a Sharia state he failed due to opposition from the large number of Chechens who remained Christians.

      Of course during the Chechen wars, the majority of Christian Chechens were annihilated by the (supposedly) Christian Russians, or were forced to flee to Georgia, or converted and followed Shamyl.

      So Voice Of Retardation, it was Russian brutality (surprise, surprise) that forced the Chechens in to the arms of Islam.

      • How could be they christianized by georgians in the8th century if Georgians in the 8th century were actually part of Persia and then, later on, of Arab Caliphate?

        • Well Simon, try reading some history.

          Georgia was Christianised in the 4th century, and was well known for its missionary work in the north caucasus.

          In addition, not all of what is now Georgia was occupied by the Persians or the Arabs.

          EARLY MEDIEVAL GEORGIA: 620 – 1089

          By the year 656, most of the South Caucasus except Lazica–Egrisi, was overrun by the expanding Arabs and became part of the Arab Caliphate that by that time included all of the Middle East, North Africa and parts of Europe.

          In the former Iberia-Kartlia, an Emirate of Tephelis was established with the centre in Tephelis (Tbilisi). That caused mass migrations of Kartvelian-speaking population westwards to Byzantine-controlled Lazica. As a result, several areas of formerly Svan- and Zan-dominated Lazica became Kartvelian-speaking among them Racha, Imereti and Guria (including today’s Achara)

          However, the Byzantine-Arab wars and partial disintegration of the Caliphate, created pre-conditions for the restoration of some elements of Georgian statehood: between 780 and 790 the Principality of Kakheti (formerly north-eastern Iberia) and the Kingdom of Ereti (formerly he easternmost area of Iberia and north-western Albania) gained sovereignty by seceding from the Emirate of Tephelis.

          Approximately ten yeas later, Abkhazian Achrontos (Byzantine-appointed Governor) Leon launched an anti-imperial uprising, ousted Byzantine troops from most of Lazica, proclaimed the Kingdom of Egris-Abkhazia and bestowed the title of the King upon himself. As of today, some verbal supporters of Abkhazian separatism mistakenly believe that the Kingdom of Egris-Abkhazia was the first state of the Apsuans. That is wrong due to the fact that by its whole nature, Egris-Abkhazia was a pure example of a Georgian state: the majority of its population were Svans, Zans and Kartvelians (all the three groups were speaking closely related languages and were representing the branches of the furture Georgian nation), the official languages were Kartvelian (Georgian) alongside with Greek, the capital of the Kingdom was Kutaisi that was almost purely Kartvelian city. Two decades later, Egris-Abkhazia also seceded from Byzantine Empire ecclesiastically: Egris-Abkhazian church broke with the Patriarch of Constantinople and went under the Jurisdiction of the Catholicos of Mtskheta (the head of East Georgian Orthodox Christian Church) and switched the language of services from Greek to Georgian (Kartvelian). In fact, that was the creation of a united Georgian church that has been existing since the above events excluding a relatively short period of time between 1810 and 1917.

          The first decades of the 9th century saw the birth rise of a new Georgian state in Tao-Klarjeti.
          Liberated from the Arabs by Curopalate Ashot of the princely family of Bagrationi the territory of former southern Iberia including the Principalities of Tao and Klarjeti as well as the Earldoms of Shavsheti, Khikhata, Samtskhe, Trialeti, Javakheti and Ashotsi, was formally a part of Byzantine Empire under the name of “Curopalatinate of Iberia”. However in fact, Ashot Bagrationi was running a fully independent country with its capital in Artanuji. The hereditary title of Curopalate was kept by Bagrationi family whose representatives ruled Tao-Klarjeti for almost a century. Curopalate David bagrationi expanded his domain by annexing the city of Theodossiopolis (Karin, Karnukalaki), Armenian province of Basiani and imposing protectorate over Armenian provinces of Kharqi, Apakhuni, Mantsikert and Khlat formerly controlled by the Kaysithe Arab Emirs.

          The first united Georgian monarchy started forming at the end of the 10th century when Curopalate David invaded the Erldom of Kartli previously disputed between the Emirate of Tephelis, and the Kingdoms of Kakheti and Egris-Abkhazia, and crowned his adopted son Bagrat Bagrationi the King of Kartli in 975. Three years later, after the death of his uncle Theodosius the Blind, King of Egris-Abkhazia , Bagrat inherited Abkhazian throne. In 1001 Bagrat also included Tao-Klarjeti (Curopalatinate of Iberia) into his domain as a result of David’s death and finally, in 1008-1010 annexed Kakheti and Ereti thus becoming the King of the united Georgia both eastern and western.

          The second half of the 11th century was marked by the disastrous invasion of the Seljuk Turks who by the end of 1040s succeeded in building a vast nomadic empire including most of the Central Asia and Iran. In 1071 Seljuk army destroyed the united Byzantine-Armenian and Georgian forces in the battle of Mantsikert, and by 1081, all of Armenia, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Syria and most of Georgia and other countries of the area were conquered and devastated by the Seljuks.

          In Georgia, only mountainous areas of Abkhazia, Svanetia, Racha and Khevi-Khevsureti remained out of Seljuk control and served as relatively safe haven for numerous refugees. All the rest of the country was dominated by the conquerors that were destroying the cities and fortresses, looting the villages, wiping out both aristocracy and farming population and colonizing the country with the nomadic tribes from Central Asia. In fact, by the end of the 80s of the 11th century, Georgians were at the edge of being irreversibly outnumbered by the newcomers in their own land.

          The Anti-Seljuk struggle in Georgia was led by the young King David IV who inherited the throne in 1089 in the age of 16 after the abdication of his father George II Bagrationi.

          Andrew Andersen

          http://www.conflicts.rem33.com/images/Georgia/geor_histr%202.htm

      • Islam came to Chechnya from Dagestan. Imam Shamil was also a Dagestani Avar. His Chechen followers kept annoying him all the time because of their dancing and smoking habits, incompatible to his fundemantalist version of Islam. (“Good warriors, bad Muslims.”)

        Talking about the smoking mujahideen of Chechnya, funny how many people comment about smoking here and how much it’s “haram”:

  5. Voice of Reason

    Robert wrote:”And for this they must cut all their ties with Russia, rid of their Russian puppets, and revert to building democracy, this time with international help.”

    That’s as absurd as saying that Pakistanis, Iraqis, Afghanis, Saudis, Iranians etc “must cut all their ties with USA, rid of their American puppets, and revert to building democracy, this time with international help”.

    With or without Americans and Russians, the Iraqis, Chechens, Iranians, Afghnais, Pakis etc act as medieval as always.

    • There’s democracy in America.

      There was never democracy in Iraq and Afghanistan before the American intervention.

      There’s a massive international aid (including UN aid) to both Iraq and Afghanistan.

      If by “acting medieval as alwyas” you mean holding free elections and letting Russian prisoners go only on promise to “be always good to their mothers and never fight the Chechens again” (Basayev in January 1995, before the Russians killed his family), than maybe you’re right.

      • Voice of Reason

        Robert explained why America has the right to invade and occupy Iraq and other countries: “There’s democracy in America. There was never democracy in Iraq and Afghanistan before the American intervention.

        In other words, America has the right to invade and destroy any country whose government system it doesn’t like? Just as Hitler had the right to invade USSR because USSR was ruled by brutal dictator Stalin and Bolsheviks…

        • Tell me how Afghanistan was “destroyed” since September 2001?

          • No, it was destroyed earlier. By the USSR from one side and US and Pakistan fom another.

            But the guys you think about when you imagine Afghanistan were created and trained by the CIA.

            Don’t forget to say a “thank you” next time you see your officer.

  6. ”Yeah we do this but the US does that”

    So jealous, pathetic and typical of the homo-sovieticus males.

    Ever heard of taking responsibility?

  7. Wal:
    “So jealous, pathetic and typical of the homo-sovieticus males. Ever heard of taking responsibility?”
    —————————————

    No lesson was learned yet?
    Taking responsibilty before the Freedom House/The American Committee for Peace in the Caucasus pimps. ???
    Do you want to ask Mr.Saakashvili as the only US beacon of democracy and last hope in the region to initiate a go-around this coming summer?
    But in my point of view he was too affected by a Russian jet-fighter in the deep blue Georgia sky and too quick to run and hide. A couple of additional years in a Boston madhouse would do him much good and may make him look more brave on a TV screen to advance democracy in Ossetia next time. CIA-sponsored MK Ultra pills is the answer to all the problems of the US in the Caucasus.

    • @Taking responsibilty before the Freedom House/The American Committee for Peace in the Caucasus pimps. ???

      Taking responsibility for what, their efforts for freedom and for peace? Sure, I mean isn’t it even implied in their very names?

      Anyway, here’s more of “taking responsibility”:

      http://www.peaceinthecaucasus.org/about

      But I don’t understand, why did you call them “pimps”? Do you think whenever Kadyrov’s Russian policemen murder some prostitutes, and of course he claims how he is fighting the agents of “all western secret services” as usual, do you think the victims actually worked for the ACPC?

  8. Robert :
    “But I don’t understand, why did you call them “pimps”? Do you think whenever Kadyrov’s Russian policemen murder some prostitutes, and of course he claims how he is fighting the agents of “all western secret services” as usual, do you think the victims actually worked for the ACPC?”
    ———————–

    In a sense I do. You seem to be on the right track, Robert. “Some prostitutes Kadyrov’s Russian policemen do murder” are used as female walking bombs “actually working for the ACPC at concert halls and subway stations”.
    OK. Let’s call them ACPC proxy-prostitutes if it suits you better and sounds more politically correct. Same goes for http://www.peaceinthecaucasus.org/about

    • I still don’t quite understand you. How can be murdered (alleged) prostitutes “used as walking bombs”?

      http://www.themoscowtimes.com/news/article/kadyrov-defends-honor-killings/374894.html

      What “goes for” the ACPC? Do you think they’re making the murdered (alleged) prostitutes into “walking bombs” once they’re killed and found dumped on a roadside “because of their loose morals”?

      Also the ACPC really isn’t doing much at all. Their original materials are http://www.peaceinthecaucasus.org/node/58 and that’s all (a couple of interviews with human rights activists, a couple of articles by local journalists, and two open letters). I don’t know why are you so obsessed with such obscure little website. Jamestown Foundation (especially the Chechnya/Caucasus Weekly) or Prague Watchdog ( http://www.watchdog.cz/ ) did literally thousands times more work on the subject. So what’s the matter, rts?

  9. Speaking of PW (funded by http://www.ned.org/my dear rts),

    Umar Israilov might easily be alive today had the Austrian police done their job properly, without taking any measures beyond those that are prescribed by law. In the summer of 2008 Israilov, one of Kadyrov’s former security guards, who had given the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg information about the Chechen leader’s personal involvement in kidnapping, torture and murder, appealed to the Austrian authorities to provide him with protection because he believed that his life was in danger. At the same time, one of Kadyrov’s assistants, known by the alias “Arbi” (referred to as “Artur K” in the Austrian prosecutor’s report), told the Austrian police that he had been sent to Vienna to kill Israilov. He also told them that Kadyrov had a hit list of people he wanted eliminated. The Austrian authorities refused to grant protection to Israilov. They saw “no reason to presuppose danger”. Arbi, who had asked for protection for himself and his family, was deported back to Russia. In January 2009 Israilov was killed. After his extradition Arbi disappeared, and the report of the Austrian prosecutor suggested he was no longer alive. Another witness in the Israilov case who had pointed to the identity of the actual killer, was found dead in Azerbaijan.

    http://www.watchdog.cz/?show=000000-000024-000001-000038&lang=1

    • Bobby, Umar was not Jew. He was a Chechen, friend of Movsar Barayev. He is buried at the muslim cemetery in Vienne now. Get over it.

  10. We can hardly make right judgements on separate security actions of that or another country, they pile up each coming day. We don’t know details. Let’s take instead a broader view of things and consider basic trends.

    In the respect of : http://www.themoscowtimes.com/news/article/kadyrov-defends-honorkillings/374894.htmlhonor killings
    let me direct you right to the US close “partner and faithful friend” Saudi Arabia and its Sharia legislation. Check it point by point, I promise you’ll be surprised. You won’t believe it, these things (honor killings) were quite popular moral measures in democratic Dudaev’s Ichkeria and were mostly implemented by the Saudi experts. Bodies (not only Russian) were being found on a daily basis way back then.
    Societies differ in a million ways, in case you support “universal American values” and are against ‘honor killings’ you’d better go to the democratic kingdoms and principalities of the Gulf area where they’ll willingly deliver you a couple of lectures on femenists’ rights and previlegies.
    To cut it short you have deprived Putin the right the oil-sucking America is blessed with in its relations with Muslim kings. Or what, general talk in bluh bluh bluh manner ???

    • @that or another country

      Chechnya allegedly is Russia. (Or at least Mr. Putin sez so.)

      @quite popular moral measures in democratic Dudaev’s Ichkeria and were mostly implemented by the Saudi experts.

      There were no “Saudi experts” in Dudayev’s state. Maybe some when he tried to make a “new Kuwait” out of the Grozny oilfields. (Before the Russians made “a second Kuwait” there in “Kuwaiti 1991 fires” sense, setting everything ablaze.)

      Anyway the “honor killings” here were really a “police” operation, they killed the 7 alleged prostitutes on a single day and dumped all of them on a roadside (for their real families to find and bury).

      @US close “partner and faithful friend” Saudi Arabia

      The tiny difference here is the USA is not not claiming Saudi Arabia to be “a US state” and Saudi police to be “US police”. It’s an independent and sovereign foreign country, it’s not even occupied (unless you think like bin Laden thinks, but it’s more like “infidels in the holy land” thing).

      But IF it was in America, such “police action” would be met with a response like this:

      • In case if you didn’t see the film, it’s about FBI investigation after Mississippi policemen forcibly disappeared a carload of Jewish and black activists:

        http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAburning.htm

        And now remember there were thousands of forced disapperances in Chechnya, with many, many of them actually by the FSB, and of course just no convictions in any of the cases.

        Only dozens of ECHR rulings condamning Russia and confirming the dissapeared are dead and the the Russian forces are to blame:

        http://www.srji.org/en/legal/cases

        • “many, many of them actually by the FSB”

          and, of course, you got the sources that make you say so? Not to speak about the proofs.

          • Just for one example linking the Tabletkas to the FSB (and not any of the other Russian state terror groups in this particular case):

            Enforced disappearance of Ibragim Gazdiev

            On August 8, 2007, Ibragim Gazdiev (born 1978) was abducted and “disappeared” by unknown security personnel.

            Ibragim Gazdiev worked as manager of a construction supply shop in Karabulak. Around 12:30 p.m., Gadziev’s colleagues received a phone call from a local resident (witness A., name withheld by Human Rights Watch), who told them that he had just seen Ibragim being taken away by armed personnel. According to witness A., several armed servicemen wearing masks and camouflage uniforms had stopped Gazdiev’s car in the center of Karabulak. They blocked Gazdiev on the road and motioned to him to come out of the car. Witness A. saw the servicemen check Gazdiev’s documents, put him in their minibus, take his car, and drive off in three vehicles.[182]

            Ibragim’s colleagues conveyed this information to Gadziev’s father, Mukhmed. Three days after the abduction, another witness (witness B., name not disclosed to Human Rights Watch) told Mukhmed Gazdiev that he not only saw the detention but followed the minibus until it pulled into the yard of the FSB headquarters in Ingushetia’s capital, Magas.[183]

            http://www.hrw.org/en/node/62157/section/9

            • And if you want to help in this particular case (to help to find his corpse, presumably, and of course his abductors):

              http://www.amnesty.org.uk/actions_details.asp?ActionID=522

            • “Just for one example linking the Tabletkas to the FSB”

              Check for “tabletka” and Chechnya and you’ll see that it’s a basic UAZ civilian model used by virtually any branch of military, by civilian population, local authorities – and, of course, could be easily used by the “freedom fighters”.

              Well, so if the killer drives a hammer, you would “link” him to a US military? Nice way of thinking. A democratic one.

              • Dimbo, that is “Hummer” which comes from the acrony HMMWV )High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle.

                Not “hammer”, get it right debilo.

          • Btw, even most of Kadyrov’s cowboys were first under FSB control before they were transferred to the MVD and all became “the police”.

            • Perhaps you could learn Russian to check some sources other than prepared by the RFE/RL staff…

              • Well, aside from the fact that reliable Russian sources such as Politkovskaya, Estemirova, and several others, have all been silenced by what are most likely Putins goons, the fact is that they all agree with what people like Robert have been saying.

                Russia was and is a criminal state.

                It’s police, military, and security services have and are committing massive crimes against humanity in the north and south Caucasus.

                Russian state media is totally unreliable in any regard, and can be safely ignored.

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