EDITORIAL: Russia and the Madman in Iran

EDITORIAL

Russia and the Madman in Iran

Now, even Russia is getting scared of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Frankenstein monster it has constructed in Iran.

Last week, Ahmadinejad announced that Iran would push forward to build 10 additional uranium enrichment plants it can use to make fissile materials for nuclear weapons.  The international community has been pressuring Iran to allow inspections of its facilities and to send its low-enriched waste materials out of the country for disposal, threatening sanctions if Iran does not comply.  Russia has been obstructing this pressure for years by selling Iran the technology it needs to use nuclear power, the military weapons it needs to protect it from Israeli strikes, and by voting to block sanctions int he UN security council, telling the world Iran is a peaceful nation which will use Russian technology only for social purposes.

Now, the world can see that Russia was lying and, at last, the Russians are beginning to see the peril of their lies as well. When the latest secret enrichment facility was discovered in Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency moved to censure the rogue state for lying to the world, and this time Russia joined the vote and so did China.

Reuters quoted an anonymous Russian diplomat:  “We will be thinking about sanctions but this is not an issue of the next few hours or weeks. We would rather have Iran cooperating more openly and consistently with the IAEA and showing clear steps to lift concerns — which are gaining greater foundation — than introducing sanctions against Iran.If there is a consensus on Iran sanctions, we will not stand aside.”

Even now, Russian diplomats will not speak on the record. Even now, they qualify their statements with words like “consensus” (meaning Russia may not support sanctions unless China does too) and amorphous time periods.  And yet, things have become so terrifying in Iran that not even Russia can avoid the fear.  Russia borders Iran, a nation with crazed fundamentalist government now bristling with Russian weapons and technology.  Those weapons could be used against Russia.

We’ve previously reported on how Iranians have gone into the streets chanting “death to Russia!” because Putin’s support for Ahmadinejad’s murderous band of thugs.  And now, the Iranian regime itself is turning against Russia.   Responding, Ahmadinejad stated:  “Russia made a mistake by backing the anti-Iran resolution and we believe that their analysis in this regard was incorrect.”

This is, unquestionably, the greatest foreign policy disaster in Russian history.  Not only has Russia alienated the entire civilized world by helping Iran develop the capability to build weapons of mass destruction, it has now been caught with its pants down and forced to acknowledge that it cannot control its Frankenstein monster, which may well turn and ravage Russia.  Did Vladimir Putin really think his nation, which has mercilessly repressed and slaughtered Muslims in the Caucasus region, could continue to curry favor with Iran?

And worst of all, the people of Russia just don’t care. Reuters reported that when Vladimir Putin took phone questions from his countrymen last week “foreign affairs were barely mentioned in a session dominated by domestic issues.”  Russians are content, as they always have been, to ignore the fact that their government is terrorizing their neighbors and the globe, interested only in their own comfort. There is no such thing as civic activism in Russia where the main body of the population is concerned, no opposition politics, no criticism of Putin in the parliament, not even when he takes actions which directly threaten Russian security.

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5 responses to “EDITORIAL: Russia and the Madman in Iran

  1. “This is, unquestionably, the greatest foreign policy disaster in Russian history.”

    Well, how about the Moscow’s support for Germans before the “Great Patriotic War”?

    Or, speaking of near Iran, their Afghanistan policy in the 1970s? (In 1979 they invaded to depose the staunchily pro-Moscow regime they helped to put there in first place – before they killed him, disoriented Amin’s last call was to Moscow for help!)

    • Oh, and another HUGE foreign policy disaster would be their support for Serbia in 1914.

      I find it really hard to understand why they, completely unprepared and outclassed (as proved by the complete humilitation of the Russo-Japanese War), embarked on this stupid adventure anyway.

      It was a national suicide in the name of some bull**** ideology and myths. And so 3 years later their country ceased to exist – even before the Great War ended. Well played, indeed.

      • The reason was fairly simple, and it made a fair amount of sense at the time. Simply put, the Serbians and Montenegrins were Russia’s allies on the Hapsburg Empire’s Southern border, and they were now threatened with open invasion and either servitude or outright annexation, thus securing Austria’s Balkan flank in any future war.

        In addition, the activities of the fairly competent Russian intelligence services had utterly comrpomised Austro-Hungarian security (for a good portion of time, they had a mole- Alfred Redl- as the HEAD of Austrian intelligence!), more-or-less obtaining the Dual Monarchy’s entire war plans, and enough from the Germans to know that their main effort in any such war would be against the Western Allies.

        However, time was running out to exploit this. Firstly, Redl and most of his compatriots had been found out- with Redl actually volunteering much of the data before being allowed to commit suicide-, and so it was only a matter of time until the Austro-Hungarian military- even as it was- changed the war plans and thus negated the advantages Russian espionage had granted. In addition, without immediate intervention, their Balkan allies would certainly have been snuffed out, this freeing up the Austrian army to focus its power in Galicia.

        Given those circumstances, it is fairly easy to see why they went to war when they did, particulalrly when they thought they had learned from the mistakes of 1904/5 (naturally, they hadn’t, but perception often helps determine developments in reality).

        Indeed, truth be told, Russia faired fairly well in the first year of the war, and had Germany’s skeleton garrison in East Prussia not turned out to include some of the leading strategic thinkers of the day, it is entirely likely that they would have won an unqualified victory in the East in 1914, which could well have changed the course of the war.

        Granted, they horrifically botched the actual handling of the war, but their reasons for entering it were fairly solid.

  2. Excellent article. Russia politically is just a rotting carcase, it does all it can to retain some external influence. Even if this means backing lunatics in Iran or anti American commies in South America. Putin has been playing a dangerous game by blocking sanctions and helping Iran’s nuclear programme. The Russians realised the situation was out of control and thought they could bring Iran into line by offering to enrich their uranium in Russia. But the Iranians won’t play ball and have told them to “naff off” This shows the world that Russia has no influence over Iran the Iranians were playing them like a fine violin. Thanks to Russian incompetence and meddling we now face a potentially catastrophic situation.

  3. Russia had to dilivery to Iran S-300 and at the moment delay is like 5 years)))so relationship between Russia and Iran is very complicated especially in conditions of USA and Israel pressure and attempts of Russia to build relationship with Israel.

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