EDITORIAL: Georgia, Triumphant!

EDITORIA

Georgia, Triumphant!

It’s not surprising that Russians are motivated to acts of craven, violent desperation as they see tiny Georgia humiliate them before world.

Last week, even as the proud and defiant words of Georgia’s president were appearing in the Washington Post, the IMF announced that it was increasing economic support to the Georgian government by more than 50%.  Meanwhile, Russia is saddled with the massive economic burden of maintaining the impoverished Ossetia and Abkahazia regions, while Georgia is relieved of it, even as the Russian economy enters its worst recession in modern history. And that’s to say nothing of the nearly $30 billion in costs and losses Russia incurred from the war itself — money Russia’s sick population, which does not rank in the top 150 nations of the world for lifespan, desperately needed for social services.

How can Russia respond? Only with truly pathetic efforts to crash websites through cyberterrorism.

What did Russia gain from the August war?  It already had nearly total control over Ossetia and Abkhazia with a massive military presence.  Russia could have gained only two things by its brazen military assault:  (1) Worldwide recognition of the two enclaves as independent or as part of Russia and (2) regime change in Tbilisi. Russia achieved neither of these goals, and instead it martyred Saakashvili, making him far more viable both at home and abroad.  What’s more, Russia’s actions exposed the Russian military’s crude backwardness as it forced officers to communicate on personal cell phones and shot down its own aircraft.  And most important, seeing Russian tanks rolling into a tiny neighbor reminded the whole of Europe, especially Eastern Europe, just how dangerous Russia really is.  The region recoiled in horor, and jump-started the feared Nabucco pipeline that aims to wean Europe off Russian gas.

There’s simply no way that things could have gone any worse for Russia during the course of this war.  Seeing Russians swaggering with arrogance at their ability to defeat a country as tiny and powerless as Georgia makes Russians look weak and pathetic, not strong and intimidating.  The world saw at last that Russia has no clothes.

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35 responses to “EDITORIAL: Georgia, Triumphant!

  1. EDITORIAL: Georgia, Triumphant! ???

    You have lost the sense of reality, to put it very mildly.

    • RTS:

      You are violating our rules. If there is something factually incorrect in the evidence we have stated to back up our conclusion, please let us know. If you have your own documented evidence which support a contrary inclusion, by all means tell us about it. If you don’t care to do either, then don’t comment. If you continue, you will be banned.

  2. Sorry, but you idiots celebrate ‘Victory Day’ don’t you?

    You have never had a reality rts.

  3. rts, why keep it mild?! Say it like it is:

    It is obvious for anybody that Russia was triumphant in a short victorious operation of 2008! Proud people of Abkhazia and South Ossetia gained the independence of murderous Georgian regime that they didn’t have before.

    Abkhazia just introduced visa-free regime, and tens of thousands of tourists from Europe and The Gulf are flocking to gorgeous beaches of Sukhum and Gagr. Thanks to that, Abkhaz government is paying Russia millions of rubles for friendly assistance that Russian troops provide. It is not quite clear how Ossetia is making money, but they are paying Russia hundreds thousands of rubles as well; so we don’t ask questions.

    Russian economy flourished thanks to additional nanotechnology contracts that wouldn’t be possible without this awesome victory. Tskhinval Institute of Advanced Computing Science contributed mightily to the development and launch of new Russian pride – Bulava missile.

    The only remaining task is to remove that tie-chewing fascist from power; but given the millions of proud Georgians demonstrate against his iron-fist rule, the hour of ball-hanging is coming in a matter of weeks, if not days!

    In short, any clear-minded viewer of Russian TV can see that Russia was, is, and will forever be triumphant! If you deny that, you are either crazy, or your Joowish overlords are paying you to say that!

    LR: please, don’t ban rts! Where else can we get such concentrated fountain of fun. When my son asked the other day, why we left the USSR, I just pointed that rts represents 78 per cent of Russian population. Need I say more!

    • > LR: please, don’t ban rts!

      Asking a russophobe to tolerate civil liberties and the free speech is like asking a vulture to eat spinach. Even an innocent dissident like Valeria Novodvorskaya, who is 1000000 times less repulsive and more honorable than your russophobic friends here, brags that if she became Russian President, the first thing she would do on her first day, would be to ban all dissent, including not only the Communist Party but even the backbone of the anti-Putin Kasparov-Limonov’s “Other Russia” coalition. That’s right: she would be much more ruthless towards Other Russia than Putin himself.

      > When my son asked the other day, why we left the USSR, I just pointed that rts represents 78 per cent of Russian population. Need I say more!

      Please do say more. First of all, please tell me what kind of an insane asylum would USA be if the xenophobic owner of this blog or, say, Psalomschik or Penny represented 78 per cent of the American population.

      And second, given that your autobiography says that you grew up in Riga, Latvia and came to the United States in 1990 less than 2 years before Latvia became independent, please tell me why you didn’t return home to Latvia back in late 1991 – early 1992. Weren’t most of your parents and/or siblings and most of your relatives and friends still living in Latvia? Home always beckons a man to return, doesn’t it? Especially in the first 3 or 4 years. So, what is so horrible about the free and democratic Latvia that forced you to abandon your dreams of returning home in the early 1990s, Felix?

      • QED Phobophobe, he does not want to live next door to RuSSians.

        Sounds quite reasonable to me.

        Considering how Russophile you are, and with your ancestry, why don’t you go to Russia?

        • Excuse me, Andrew, but let me remind you that you yourself live “next door to RuSSians”. You are a real hoot.

          • So, some of us are prepared to take the risk.

            But it certainly taxes the nerves somewhat.

            Like I said, not wanting to live next door to Russia is quite reasonable.

            • Andrew, you didn’t have to do all that. While your mommy is probably proud that you have overcome your childhood mental difficulties and learned how to copy-and-paste tons of long boring articles that nobody has time to read, that’s not what I asked. I asked you how come after having lived under Russian presumably “brutal and genocidal” rule for several centuries, both S. Ossetians and Abkhazians chose to remain with Russia instead of going with Georgia both in the 1918-1921 point in history and in the modern 1980s – 1990s point. Why? Can you answer me in human language without drowning my question with a flood of somebody else’s words?

          • Andrew, don’t make me laugh by comparing Georgia and Latvia. Latvia is a civilised country, and minorities (including Russians) will never raise weapons to fight against the Latvian government. Thus, Latvia has nothing to fear from Russia.

            On the other hand, Georgia has done so much evil to Ossetians and Abkhazians that Russian peacekeepers have to be there.

            Let me ask you a question, Andrew. If we were to believe all these hundreds of articles by LR, you and Robert about how “genocidal” Russia has been towards **all** Caucuses peoples, then why is it that not only in modern times but also in the past, every time Abkhazia and S. Ossetia were to be separated from Russia – they rebelled?

            If Russians are such genocidists – then why do Abkhazians dream about becoming part of Russia and have fought for this right in the past? And if Georgians treat minorities better than Russians – then why do Ossetians and Abhazians preferring (to put it mildly) be under Russian rule?

            Come on! Invent a good story! I need more laughs.

            • Actually the Abkhaz do not dream of being part of Russia my retarded friend. In fact a lot of them are complaining about a creeping opressive takeover by Russia.

              http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/4a8160a0a.html

              At a time when the opposition in South Ossetia is attempting to get Moscow more involved in political fights there, many Abkhazians, especially among the local opposition and in the influential diaspora in Turkey, are expressing concerns that their republic is being “swallowed up” by Russians and Russia.

              Writing in today’s “Nezavisimaya gazeta,” Yury Simonyan points to the recent declaration of a group of influential Abkhazians calling for reining in President Sergey Bagapsh after he ceded to Russian institutions control over local railroads, the airport, and borders and failed to restrict Russian land purchases (www.ng.ru/politics/2009-05-22/1_abhazia.html).

              Such concessions, the opposition leaders fear, could “convert Abkhazia into a quasi-state Russian entity” capable of surviving only on Moscow’s handouts. Equally sharp criticism of Bagapsh’s actions in this regard, the “Nezavisimaya gazeta” journalist says, have come in from Abkhazians in Turkey.

              Fears about Russia’s plans in and for Abkhazia have been a subtext in politics there since last summer. In the wake of Russian recognition of the independence of the breakaway republic, some Abkhazians said “we left Georgia in order to preserve our statehood and culture” and “we do not want to lose all this as a result of a close union with the Russian Federation.”

              Sergey Shamba, the republic’s foreign minister, said at that time that the numerically small Abkhaz people feared that it might be subject “to the threat of assimilation including state assimilation” by the larger Russian community. And Abkhazian media criticized the overly large “appetites” of Russian businessmen for property in Abkhazia.

              Bagapsh himself, even though his relations with Moscow have not always been trouble-free, continues to insist that Russia necessarily remains Abkhazia’s “main partner, a guarantor of our security and development.” But it is clear, Simonyan suggests, that he too is concerned about falling too much under Russia’s control.

              The recent declaration, made by the leaders of six political and social organizations in the republic, also seeks a balanced relationship with Russia. On the one hand, they acknowledge that Russia is Abkhazia’s “single real ally,” but on the other, they call for “the establishment and strengthening of genuinely equal relations between Abkhazia and Russia.”

              Other Abkhazians told Simonyan that this declaration represented “an informal start” of the presidential campaign, which will culminate in elections on December 12th. But they noted that there were other reasons as well: fear of unemployment, concerns about national dignity, and worries about power.

              Georgians in Tbilisi, like Vice Prime Minister Temur Yakobashvili, told Simonyan that they had “warned the Abkhaz side that [Russia’s offer of] free cheese would be in a mousetrap” for the breakaway nation. And he added that since the Russian government doesn’t listen to its own opposition, Moscow is unlikely to listen to the Abkhazian one.

              Some Russian analysts are dismissive of the Abkhaz protest. Aleksey Malashenko of the Moscow Carnegie Center, for example, suggested that “the Abkhaz opposition cannot be in opposition to Russia a priori” because of Moscow’s role in securing their independence. But such expectation of gratitude is probably a stronger emotion than the gratitude itself.

              In any case, these tensions in Abkhazia over Russia’s role point to three important conclusions. First, the situations in Abkhazia and South Ossetia are fundamentally different, something Georgia, Russia and the international community must recognize if they are going to find a way out of the current impasse.

              Second, the tensions in Abkhazia suggest that Russia may be overplaying its hand, driving away those who had supported it and thus opening a path for the exploration of relations between Sukhumi and other centers in ways that Georgia and its partners might be in a position to exploit.

              And third – and this is the most indisputable conclusion – these tensions in Sukhumi show that the events of last summer and fall are far from over, that Moscow’s recognition of Abkhazian independence is not the end of the story but rather only the conclusion of a single chapter. Thus, what lies ahead is likely to be far more open than any of the sides now assume.

              Window on Eurasia

              http://politicom.moldova.org/news/abkhazians-fear-russia-will-swallow-their-republic-200831-eng.html

              In addition, many Abkhaz fought on the Georgian side (and vice versa) during the war in Abkhazia, and many South Ossetians supported South Ossetia remaining within Georgia (including Dimitry Sanakoyev, 1st PM of South Ossetia), so the situation is not as black and white as you paint it.

              Then again, as you are a well known liar, why should anyone listen to a word you say Ostap?

            • SUKHUMI — A row of Russian and Abkhaz flags flutter in the Black Sea breeze in front of the stately government headquarters in the Abkhaz capital. Along the winding beachfront promenade, locals point out the properties rumored to be earmarked for Russian investors.

              It’s a poignant vista for this separatist territory that has long been trying to convince the world — and itself — that it is an independent country.

              There was euphoria here 10 months ago when Moscow recognized Abkhazia’s independence from Tbilisi following the five-day Russia-Georgia war. But as Russian troops, cash, and influence pour into this tiny and picturesque Black Sea region, many Abkhaz worry that rather than winning their coveted autonomy last August they may have simply traded one overlord for another.

              Sipping iced tea in an outdoor cafe overlooking Sukhumi’s beaches and ramshackle piers, local journalist Inal Khashig, founder and editor of the opposition newspaper “Chegemskaya pravda,” says Sukhumi’s independence bid was supposed to “mean independence not only from Georgia but from any other country as well.”

              But that dream, he says, appears to be quickly slipping away.

              “We had a poor understanding of what was going on that day, August 26, when Russia recognized us,” Khashig says.

              “It was an emotional wave. Only later did we figure out that we were not getting what we wanted. Earlier, even though nobody recognized us, we were truly independent. Now, after recognizing Abkhazia, Russia is swallowing us. This is happening economically, politically, militarily, and socially. Every day we are becoming more and more dependent.”

              This dependence is visible in the most basic ways. Most Abkhaz residents carry Russian passports. The Russian ruble is their official currency. They communicate predominantly in the Russian language. And at least 3,800 Russian troops are based on their territory, including many on their frontiers.

              Even some gas stations in Sukhumi fly Russian flags. Russian television dominates the airwaves and Russian newspapers are ubiquitous.

            • Andrew, you didn’t have to do all that. While your mommy is probably proud that you have overcome your childhood mental difficulties and learned how to copy-and-paste tons of long boring articles that nobody has time to read, that’s not what I asked. I asked you how come after having lived under Russian presumably “brutal and genocidal” rule for several centuries, both S. Ossetians and Abkhazians chose to remain with Russia instead of going with Georgia both in the 1918-1921 point in history and in the modern 1980s – 1990s point. How come? Can you answer me in human language without drowning my question with a flood of somebody else’s words?

  4. La Russophobe

    Yes, I do have my own well documented evidence that Georgia has failed in its war on S.Ossetia. I dare say you are “factually incorrect” about the title of your editorial which is totally wrong if not funny. This is the only reason my previous post consisted of 8 words.
    And don’t forget Eugene. He’s doing his possible best to make a mocery of your blog with his translations of some of your comments chosen on his choice. If you consider yourself to be an expert in this field, you must get the message right.

  5. so, “rts” where is this “factual evidence”? All you scribble is useless declarations copying your natz-leaders… Give us some proof, please… If not, then shut up your stupid mouth.

  6. You are a more tolerant human than I am, Felix, I’d ban that little fascist insect and his depraved screed in a heartbeat for the same reason that inviting Ahmadinejad to Columbia University deserved the public indignation and backlash that it got. There are certain ideas and their messengers that deserve being asked to leave the presence of decent people.

    I am certain that Churchill nor Roosevelt would have degraded themselves debating Hitler on the radio.

    As friends we can agree to disagree.

    I guess what I’m saying is that I have real issues with responding to rts directly as if he/she’s garbage merited a reply.

  7. This from the Financial Times. Welcome to the reality of Russia’s warm embrace South Ossetia ! -

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/0a901e78-83b1-11de-a24e-00144feabdc0.html

    ‘…Stanislav Kochiv, speaker of the South Ossetian parliament who leads the local Communist party, said: “Our economy is broken and we are living on Russian hand-outs.”……Russia posted forces in South Ossetia and Abkhazia but its reconstruction pledges have come to little after funding was halted this year amid reports the money had been pocketed…’

  8. …and form the same article

    ‘Georgia has received $4.5bn (€3.2bn, £2.7bn) of international assistance, $1bn of it from the US. Civilian infrastructure has been repaired and the economy has stabilised….’

    Not really hard to see who came out of this better off is it ?

    • > Not really hard to see who came out of this better off is it ?

      I can tell you for sure who came out of this worst off: the poor American taxpayers.

  9. Bogdan of Australia

    Judging after his insane rants, the ridiculous individual calling himself RTS must be;

    a – a retired, low ranking and embittered KGB operative,
    b – a former toillet cleaner from Lubianka,
    c – what is most likely, an out of wedlock litter of VASILIJ BLOHIN – the chief executioner of Polish officers in KATYN and the most efficient killer in history of humanity, who used to boast that he has himself murdered more than 50 000 people; a True Hero Of USSR!

    Hence his eternal inability to free himself from his status as an enthusiastic slave of COMMUNO-FASCISM, even in the face of its such a spectacular failure.

    It is, however, a pure waste of time to argue with the individuals like RTS. He is haunting the noble blog La Russophobe like that monstrous, revolting demon – Incubus, visiting women in their dreams.

    When ignored though, Incubus dissapears.

    Greetings from Aussie!

  10. penny -

    where you and I completely agree is that debating with rts and eugene and whoever else gives them credibility that they don’t deserve. As I said many times – I work in a pharmaceutical company, where scientists research the guinea pigs; not discuss test results with them.

    Inviting Ahmadinejad to Columbia, as well as bestowing Pulitzer to Walter Duranty said more about Columbia and Pulitzer than about the recipients. However, the position of LR is quite clear. So allowing the proles to express their views (as long as they don’t pollute and don’t use expletives) and emphasizing that they represent 78 per cent of Russian population is quite helpful to make our point: Russians deserve the government that they have…

    • > pharmaceutical company, where scientists research the guinea pigs; not discuss test results with them.

      That’s exactly right: most opponents of russohobia study your behaviour in your home environment here and then post the results of their observations in other blogs. You guys represent quite a juicy little group of bigots and xenophobes, from the psychiatric and sociopathic point of view. Incessant gloating over Maria Sharapova’s shoulder injury alone can provide enough material for a PHD thesis in psychopathology.

      • Phobophobe,

        As much as you try, I am not going to discuss anything with you. As any unbiased reader can attest, I was trying to be civil and substantive, I emphasized the points where we can agree, and thought we could have an intelligent discussion. I was wrong.

        So some stubborn Russian emigrant doesn’t want to talk to you. Big deal! Get over it already – don’t ask questions that won’t get answered.

        • Felix wrote:
          > As much as you try, I am not going to discuss anything with you.

          Felix, you should really ask your shrink to add “napoleonic complex” to the list you two are working on.

          Like everybody else, when I reply to somebody else’s post, I do not mean to engage that person in a private discussion. My comments are meant not for you but for all readers equally. Accordingly, I don’t expect you to reply to me any more than I expect your mental twins like Penny and Psalomschik to reply to me here.

          To me, the content of the message is much more important than the messenger. This is true of all men and even boys of mental maturity above 9 years old. What amazes me is that you have managed to preserve childish обидчивость, pettiness and ad hominem approach to arguing well into what appears to be your middle age.

  11. Boghan,
    I agree with you 100% although point b) former toilet cleaner is problematic for me. THEY DO NOT CLEAN THEIR TOILETS. To prove it listen to what I saw in ex USSR; public toilet at Kurskiy Vagzal, I saw wall covered with excrements up to the ceiling all in shape of human hands and on this s…y wall there was Lenin’s portrait hanging – VINTAGE RUSSIA!!!!

  12. mcc drive through Detroit. You’ll see a whole city covered with excrement. Vintage Motown!

    Anyways. LR. The words “proud and defiant ” simply cannot be written even in the same sentence as “Georgia’s president”. For crying out loud, everytime anyone in the world thinks of Mishiko they think of him chewing down a tie or running away from imaginary airplanes. Your writing style reminds me of the propaganda in old Soviet newspapers. Even they were a bit more eloquent.

    • Well the Georgians managed to shoot down quite a few Russian planes, such as the TU-22m, at least 2 SU-24, and several SU-25′s.

      Besides, in the incident you mentioned foreign media filmed the aircraft.

      Then there is the BBC film of Russian aircraft strafing civillian traffic on the Gori Tbilisi highway (including the BBC crews car).

  13. akm,

    ‘Proud and defiant’ simply cannot be written even in the same sentence’ – my foot – perhaps not in cyrillic [I thought 'this inconvenience' was removed anyway] but YES in any other civilized language/alphabet.

    Yeah, Lenin’s portrait on the wall covered with excrements it is sooo Russian. I suppose in the good old communist time those poor Russian proletarians were told that the toilet paper is a capitalist inventions/propaganda and should be avoided at any cost.

    Anyway, lets compare Mishiko with Dimasha and Volodia;

    Mishiko,
    6.4, tall good looking educated in Georgia, Western Europe and USA fluent in 6 languages.
    By the way this ‘chewing down the tie’ picture was doctored in such a crude manner that it is embarrasing to watch.

    President Saakashvili is truly a great presence on the political international scene.

    Dima and Volodia – every time I see those two trolls I think about dwarf tossing competitions in California [but I digress] – both 5.3, short-legged, unattractive, simple, linguistic skills none – pathetic for the westerners to watch [especially naked Volodia] but a great source of pride for the Russians!

  14. mcc, usa

    “Both 5.3, short-legged, unattractive, simple.”

    Tastes differ.

    Do you have your own documented evidence they have “none” linguistic skills? Putin speaks fluent German. You are a LIER or “factually incorrect in the evidence”.

    La Russophobe to rts
    (rts >mcc, usa)
    See it up the messages to be verified)

    “You are violating our rules. If there is something factually incorrect in the evidence we have stated to back up our conclusion, please let us know. If you have your own documented evidence which support a contrary inclusion, by all means tell us about it. If you don’t care to do either, then don’t comment. If you continue, you will be banned.

    • “Both 5.3, short-legged, unattractive, simple.”

      Well, Medvedev and Putin probably do have THAT sort of relationship according to rumour.

      And those shirtless photo’s do have to make you wonder. Its a well known fact that those most insecure in their sexuality try the hardest to be “macho”

      “Russian gay chat rooms and blogs were particularly intrigued by the photos: some claimed that Putin, by stripping to his waist, was somehow pleading for more tolerance for homosexuality in Russia, where gays and lesbians, for the most part, remain closeted.

      One satirical photo circulating on the Internet jokingly compared Putin’s mountain adventure with Prince Albert II of Monaco to the movie Brokeback Mountain, a love story about two cowboys who conceal a homosexual affair.”

      http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2007/08/22/putin-shirtless.html

      And just because he has daughters does not mean its impossible, after all Oscar Wilde was married with kids too.

  15. Are you homophobic Andrew? Obama might not approve of homophobic comments on LR, and cut the funding. Shhhhh!!!

    • he’s just jealous . His idol mishka has made a joke out of himself . His language skills no longer prevent him frm being unwelcome in Europe [apart from Poland , & the baltics ] & the great US itself whose all time credibility still remains low after the Iraq fiasco .

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