EDITORIAL: Russia, Standing with Iran

EDITORIAL

Russia, Standing with Iran

The world has gaped in slack-jawed horror at the photographs of a young Iranian woman lying on the streets of Tehran after being gunned down by the cowardly goons of the terrorist-supporting Islamic fundamentalist regime because she dared to offer a peaceful protest to their most recent “election” sham.  The world, that is, except for Russia.

With all the contempt we can muster, we condemn the wanton savagery that has led Russia to side with the maniacal, murderous Islamic radicals in Iran against the valiant citizens who march in support of justice.  By standing mute as their government stands alone against all the other members of the G-8 to support the Iranian regime’s brutal campaign of homicide against peaceful demonstrators, the people of Russia are as blameworthy as that government.  We condemn them.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, a weeping carbuncle on the buttocks of humanity, spoke for Russia in response to the G-8’s otherwise unanimous protest against the Iranian rogue regime’s actions and stated:  “No one is willing to condemn the election process, because it’s an exercise in democracy.”

An exercise in democracy, Mr. Lavrov? You mean the way you and your good pals in places like Iran, Syria, Venezuela and North Korea define that term?  Do you really believe you can impose your definition on the entire planet?

No one?  Is Russia the only nation in existence? Are the words of the United States and of the European Union meaningless to you and your proud KGB cohorts?  Do you really believe the world will not notice all their condemnations of the Iranian crackdown just because you say it should be so?

The world cannot be surprised by Russia’s actions. Russia, after all, has been providing nuclear technology to the Iranian lunatics for years now, playing a central role in helping them get the means to make an atomic bomb. It has been offering them diplomatic cover, using its Security Council veto to block and impede sanctions, and it has given Iran military technology to protect its nuclear development.

And Iran is not the only rogue regime Russia supports. Russia also feeds succor to Hezbollah and Syria, Hamas, Venezuela and North Korea.  Russia has no choice, of course, if it wants to have any nations at all to call “friend,” since it has been rejected by every other country on the planet.

It is time for the world, and partcularly President Obama, to realize that Russia poses at least as much threat to Western security as Iran, and indeed that Iran is only dangerous because of Russia.  He must send a clear message to Russia that if it continues down its current path of provocation, it will be destroyed just as surely as the USSR was destroyed.

56 responses to “EDITORIAL: Russia, Standing with Iran

  1. Ah, you’re forgetting Nicaragua. And Sudan.

  2. And actually the Iranian security forces are showing restraint not only compared to them in the 1980s and to Beijing in 1989, but also to Moscow in 1993. Why would the Russian regime condamn them for something less than they did in their own national capital?

    • If what they are doing is called restraint, it could well be that the powers that be are seeing themselves 30 years ago (good grief has it been that long!) in the faces of the protesters (many of whom weren’t even born yet? Also, it may be that Ahmadenajad’s (sp?) network of internal spys are telling him that this movement may be more ‘spontaneous’ than organized-some of the worst types of civil unrest to put down-when the soul of a people cry for justice. Lastly, there may be a good number in the military and Republican (?) gaurd who side with the protesters. Just some thoughts and musings.

  3. Thanks Robert,
    That was a real Rashan Riot. The reason that mascals should stay in their own country to pester each other. I wonder how much damage was done? I mean to the furniture, screw their lives.

  4. And actually the Iranian security forces are showing restraint not only compared to them in the 1980s and to Beijing in 1989, but also to Moscow in 1993. Why would the Russian regime condamn them for something less than they did in their own national capital?

    Robert,

    Having lived through the events of 1993, I can say that it was not the government but the dregs of the communist system that rose up and tried to take over the country against the will of the people.

    In other words, it was Rutskoi and Khasbulatov and followers of the anti democratic, pro communist movement (as well as Russian nationalists) that wanted to overthrow Yeltsin’s democratically elected government.
    When Rutskoi’s faction was defeated, there was a sense that real reforms and freedoms would spread through out the land.

    At Ostankino, Terry Duncan, my friend, was killed by Yeltsin’s forces. A sniper shot him in the head as he was pulling an injured journalist from the crossfire. It was probably a mistake. But no one was ever held accountable.

    In Iran, you have the youth rising up to overthrow a tyrannical regime which has no legitimacy in the eyes of the majority of the world. The protesters are pro democratic. Pro freedom and liberty and the rule of law. That is a big difference.

    The fact that Obama and Putin support the Mullahs is tragic. These are”intellectuals”. What do we peons really know?

    “No one is willing to condemn the election process, because it’s an exercise in democracy.”

    • At Ostankino, the Vityaz (former KGB special forces) simply gunned down everyone at street level, killing hundreds of people (mostly unarmed protesters and bystandards, including journalists) and losing only one (1) man. So very democratic.

      Later they (the Vityaz force) were involved in the Beslan massacre, another of some of the bloodiest incidents in the modern Russian history.

  5. “No one is willing to condemn the election process, because it’s an exercise in democracy.”

    Lavrov

    When are guns, batons and gas an exercise in democracy?

  6. GUYS;GET READY! CHECHEN MUJAHIDEEN INTELLIGENCE TODAY STATED;THAT THE RUSSIAN INVASION OF GEORGIA WILL START ON JULY 6-10. IN THE NEXT 14 DAYS! TRUST THIS REPORT! LAST YEAR THE CHECHEN INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ALREADY IN MAY DECLARED THE RUSSIAN PLANS FOR AN INVASION IN AUGUST! GEORGIANS; I WARN YOU,DON`T BE NAIVE!! PREPARE FOR A SURVIVAL-BATTLE! YOU HAVE ONLY 8-12 DAYS LEFT!!!!!!!!

  7. i agree with Akhmad. As a a german police officer with links to the german intelligence i warn the Georgians as well.Most likely the russian invasion will take place immediately after July 6,when the exercises of the russian army are finished. A friend in the german BND told me this yesterday! Georgia get ready, there will be a russian aggression in the week after next. You didn´t believe into western and chechen rebel warnings last year and were largely unprepared! I hope,you will not ignore the warnings this year! PREPARE FOR WAR!!!

  8. I am not the single one,who is warning Georgia! I am in line with the chechen rebels,with Pavel Felgenhauer,with former Putin-loyalists,with german war-correspondent Scholl-Latour,with chechen traitors from the former “Bataillion Vostok”,there are so many who are warning Georgia in these days. I pray,that they have transferred Tblissi into a fortress!!

  9. “No one is willing to condemn the election process, because it’s an exercise in democracy.”……Lavrov

    Except, once again, that wasn’t the focus of the G8’s joint letter of condemnation that Russia declined to sign and Lavrov in his choice of weasel words tried to defend.

    The G8 letter’s focus was condemning the Iranian regime’s murder of their unarmed citizens in all that followed. The G8 letter wasn’t addressing the merits of the election.

    Lavrov essentially was declining to condemn the Iranian regime’s murder of unarmed protesters. That’s all that was being asked of Russia.

  10. Robert

    I was there that night. The Rebels showed up a little after 6:30 PM. I was standing in front of Ostankino filming the commandeered military trucks, police jeeps, and ambulances. The rebels were waving red Soviet Flags. Many had pilfered Militia Riot gear, helmets, shields, and batons.

    General Mashkadov showed up after seven and give some orders to rebels. The crowd surrounded the front entrance of the Radio Building of Ostankino. I fought my way through the throngs of onlookers, most were journalists and bystanders. There were three rebels in Russian camouflage squatting down by the door. They were fiddling with something in their hands. On close inspection, I could make out that it was a “granatamot” (bazooka).

    The tv cameras and photographers could not get enough shots. I started to back away.

    Boom!

    The rebels fired the granatamot into the reception at 7:33 PM. (I know this because all the clocks in Ostankino were frozen for the next year at 7:33.)

    Then the sporadic shooting began. Bullets were flying everywhere. The crowd scattered in all direction. Many took cover behind cars parked on Academia Korlyova street. There were also large, white concrete flower pots near the sidewalk.

    I ran with my Russian friends to this industrial building that manufactured Russian Cameras. At that time we thought it was only a matter of time before the soldiers came after us. The Night guard did not want to open the main door to let the crowd of people in. He was defending the door like a good steward on a sinking ship. A military officer forced his way in with a flash of his creditientials. The levee gave way, the rest of us followed. The officer made a call to his commanding officer, demanding reinforcements. From the tone of his conversation, I don’t think he was having success.

    On the street, the gunfire was sporadic. Apparently, I learned a few days later that the granatmot had killed a young soldier inside Ostankino. His fellow soldiers went after anyone that moved on the street. There were also reports that snipers on the roofs were taking pot shots at people.
    The rebels did mount one more attack on the building with Molotov Cocktails. They set the building on fire. This is when Terry Duncan was killed. He was helping NY Times Photographer, Otto Pohl, to safety. He had been shot and was bleeding.
    Terry Duncan had been at the White House earlier in the day with his Law partner, Jamie Firestone. Apparently, the two had gotten separted. Terry had climbed into one of the rebel cars and arrived at Ostankino. I did not know he was there, near me. I did not notice him during the battle. It was only afterwards, that I learned that he was killed.

    Tragically, if you watch the clip, the camera man who is pushing the camera along the ground was also killed.

    What happedn was this. Anyone who held a camera was suspectible to sniper fire. In the dark, the silhoutte of a camera on your shoulder looks like a granatmot. That is why so many cameramen were shot.

    Up the street, near the tower, there were some firefights. I met some soldiers who were shot by rebels. One soldier told me that his bullet proof jacket saved his life.

    How many people were killed that night? It is hard to say. The government said 60. I think there were a lot more. I don’t think it was planned. I don’t think it was completely Yeltsin’s fault. The main fault lies with undisciplined and callous police and soldiers, who were trained in a system that did not value human life very much.

    The tragedy is not only the loss of life but the loss of innocence of the Russian Revolution. Yeltsin was never the same after this incident. A year later he invaded Chechenya.

    Yeltsin’s supporters had carte blanche after these events. They tore the country apart. Had there been a group of Russians similar to Jefferson, Adams and Franklin, then things would have turned out for the better. The Soviet System had weeded out the good reformers. Instead you got Berezovsky, Gusinsky, and Khordokovsky.

    • @General Mashkadov

      It was General Makashov. Soon amnestied (like all of opposition leaders – while the pawns remained dead) and later elected to Duma. I know you know this.

      The order to open fire was given by Sergei Lysiuk, the Vityaz commander and a secret KGB-FSK-FSB agent. He became a “Hero of Russia” for this.

      An account from the side of “the rebels”:
      http://exiledonline.com/limonov-files-the-best-form-of-word-is-action/

    • > Had there been a group of Russians similar to Jefferson, Adams and Franklin

      You mean, had there been a group of prosperous slaveowners? :-) BTW, the only alternative to Yeltsin in October 1993 were those you justly call “rebels”, including Russian nazi Makashov.

      • Well at the same time as the American Revolution, there were lots of prosperous slave owners in Russia, they just called the slaves serfs.
        Despite Czar Alexanders attempt to emancipate them, the Russians remain slaves in mind and soul to this day.

      • But there were slave owners in Russia, Eugene, all the way down to 1917 (muzhiki) and thereafter (the zeks).

        The difference is that Russian slaveowners did not come up with the kinds of thoughts Jefferson, Adams and Franklin created.

        Indeed, Yeltsin was, of all available alternatives, the least bad one. There, I totally agree with you.

  11. Let me be back to the editorial and be very brief: “Russia, Standing with Iran” to make Persian Gulf stay Persian, I would better call the editorial “Predators over Iran and Russia”.

    “I am saddened, that it is politically inconvenient to acknowledge what everyone knows: the Iraq war is largely about oil.” — Alan Greenspan

    • Ah, the age-old but always efficient tactics of Russian tyrants, be they czars, general secretaries, or presidents: to have the gullible populace watch for non-existent predators in the sky and thus prevent them from noticing that their own government is the greatest predator of them all…

      BTW, Arabs refer to Persian Gulf as Arabian Gulf.

      • About “watch the skies”, from Pravda (4 years ago):

        Russia and Iran join efforts to struggle against invasion of UFOs

        Iranian mass media, meanwhile, are distributing more and more information about extraterrestrial threats to the nation’s nuclear objects. The flights of unknown objects in the air space of the country have become much more frequent lately, the Resalat Daily wrote. According to the newspaper, unusual luminous objects were spotted above Busher and Natanza, where nuclear facilities are located. One of the objects exploded in the sky, eyewitnesses said. The Iranian defense department is trying to pacify the anxious population. “We have developed plans to protect nuclear objects from any danger. The Iranian Air Force is on alert and ready to fulfill the duty,” General Qarim Gavani stated.

        Translation: Russia and Iran join efforts to fail to shoot down US spy aircraft. If there really were an ongoing invasion of the world by aliens I think Russia and Iran would be pretty low on the list of who I would want saving us from them. My money is on Japan and their giant robots. Too bad Pravda has yet to write an article detailing those.

        http://www.somethingawful.com/d/news/news-according-russia.php

        • Hi Robert,

          Thank you for the chuckle. :)

          • My favourite part:

            “The good news? Russia is sending a manned mission to Mars in 2014. The bad news? Russia is sending a rocket full of corpses to Mars in 2014. The real news? Russia will be talking about their Mars mission infrequently and then just stop mentioning it altogether around 2013.”

  12. Robert,

    First of all Exile is not the the place to get serious journalism. It’s a dirty, spoof rag, written my foul mouth neo beatnik Ames.

    Second, Limonov is not the paradigm of freedom and democracy. He’ s a loon. To characterize the masses of hooligans who went to Ostankino as wanting liberty like those brave minuteman who took to the field of Concord is a gross exaggeration.

    The problem was that at the time if you supported freedom and Democracy, you supported Yeltsin, and not the rebels.

    • Yeah, beacuse Yeltsin (Grachov, Berezovsky, Putin, etc) represented “freedom and Democracy” that night (and random machinegun fire in the streets full of innocent people).

      Lysiuk’s (“the Hero” of that night and “of Russia”) Vityaz training center (Litvinenko wrote a lot about him in London):

      • From Litvinenko’s Blowing Up Russia – about the “freedom and Democracy” (and massacres and Mafia):

        (…)
        A few days after Radchikov’s arrest his deputy at the fund, Valery Voshchevoz, who monitored all of the [Afghan War Invalids] fund’s cash flows and was one of Yeltsin’s agents for the presidential campaign of 1996, was hastily dispatched to the Amur Region as the president’s plenipotentiary representative. The trial of Radchikov and his two accomplices, Mikhail Smurov and Andrei Anokhin, lasted ten months. On January 17 2000 the state prosecutor demanded sentences of 13, 15 and 10 years for the accused.

        Radchikov was accused of plotting in 1996 to kill his competitor in the ‘Afghan movement’, the chairman of the invalids’ fund Sergei Trakhirov and of giving a pistol and at least 50,000 dollars for this purpose to one of his neighbors in the apartment block, the Afghan War veteran Andrei Anokhin. Anokhin in turn persuaded Mikhail Smurov to take part in the murder for 10,000 dollars.

        Killing Trakhirov was not easy. Everywhere he went he was accompanied by bodyguards from the Vityaz unit which was under the command of S.I. Lysiuk, who worked closely with the FSB. ‘Hero of Russia’ Sergei Ivanovich Lysiuk, the founder and first commander of the Vityaz interior forces’ special operations unit of the MVD RF, had been recruited into the ranks of the secret agents of the Special Section of the KGB when he was still a senior lieutenant. The last member of the special service to act as Lysiuk’s contact was the head of the military counter-intelligence unit, Vladimir Yevgenievich Vlasov, who actually removed Lysiuk’s name from the listings of the FSB’s secret agents (so that he would not be given a new controller) and made him a so-called ‘archive agent.’ Lysiuk won his ‘Hero of Russia’ for commanding the Vityaz unit in the defense of the Ostankino television center in 1993. He was the one who gave the order to open fire on the supporters of the putsch.

        In the new circumstances Vlasov was one of Lysiuk’s deputies in his commercial firm. Operational information actually indicates that the commercial activities of Lysiuk’s firm included training contract killers, including members of Lazovsky’s group, but Lysiuk himself might not have known anything about that, even though the Moscow Region criminal investigation department reported frequent sightings of Lazovsky at Lysiuk and Vlasov’s base.

        And so the conspirators decided to blow up Trakhirov at the Kotlyakovskoe Cemetery during the wake for Mikhail Likhodei, the chairman of the Afghan War invalids’ fund who was killed in 1994. Amazingly enough, just a few days before the bombing Trakhirov’s bodyguards were changed. The new bodyguards were killed in the explosion, but the old ones from Vityaz survived. We can assume that Lysiuk might have known about the forthcoming assassination attempt from Vlasov or other people in his entourage.

        The court hearings on the case of the bombing concluded on April 18. The accused were offered the final word and all three of them said they had ‘nothing at all’ to do with the terrorist attack and asked the court to find them innocent. Radchikov’s lawyer, P. Yushin declared that the case had been deliberately fabricated. On January 21 the Moscow District Military Court under the chairmanship of colonel of justice Vladimir Serdiukov acquitted the accused because ‘their involvement in the crime committed had not been proved.’ The court regarded the arguments of the investigation into the case of the explosion at Kotlyakovskoe Cemetery as unconvincing. The acquittal was founded on the results of the court’s analysis of the remains of the explosive device, which diverged significantly from the results of the analysis carried out during the investigation. In addition a female acquaintance of one of the accused, Mikhail Smurov, testified that on the day of the explosion Smurov was at home and could not possibly have set off the explosive device as the investigators accused him of doing.

        Valery Radchikov was also acquitted on the charge of embezzling two and a half million dollars from the fund. All three accused were released directly from the court room. On July 25 2000 the Public Prosecutor’s Office lost its appeal to the Supreme Court for the acquittal to be set aside. Radchikov was intending to take the dispute to the European Court. However, at about eight o’clock in the evening on January 31 2001 he was killed in an automobile accident 39 kilometers along the Minsk Highway on his way back to Moscow in a Moskvich 2141 automobile. That same day the Novosti press agency announced that the law enforcement agencies were of the opinion that Radchikov’s death might not have been a simple accident.

        Dozens of dead bodies, millions of dollars missing and not a single criminal caught — taken altogether this is simply a statistical impossibility for the world of crime. You don’t need to be Sherlock Holmes to work out who was behind this complicated and highly successful game in which the main player suffered a fatal automobile accident at such a convenient moment.

        (Lysiuk sure took offence – and expressed this in his own way, that is shooting people, or at least their effigies if out of reach for his gunmen.)

  13. You have to admit that there was very little bloodshed with the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

    The American Revolution, the US Civil War, the French Revolution, the Balkan Wars were all bloody affairs.

    Yeltsin’s biggest blunder was to appoint Putin. The transition from Soviet Russia to Democratic Russia is a monumental task. It was made even more difficult by society that until recently purged all its “liberals” (19th Century sense).

    Then you have the Russian mentality which is completely different than in the US. The people saw the government as the solution. Better government = better society. That is not the case, because as we know, government is a necessary evil, and its powers are used for nefarious purposes if unchecked.

    If the power had been given to the people and the people had taken on that responsibility, then things might have turned out different. It is hard to break 70 years of dependence. You are asking a lot.

    • > You have to admit that there was very little bloodshed with the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

      Would you like to be one of the victims of that “very little bloodshed”? But I forget, for a Civilized Western Man, anyone living east of Elbe is an untermensch.

      > Yeltsin’s biggest blunder was to appoint Putin.

      In 1999, proceeding from the amount of misery and humiliation that befell Russia in the 1990s through the fault of Western “Cold War Winners”, I thought that the second President of the Russian federation would be some really tough guy – someone compared to whom Hitler would look like Mother Theresa. So, imho, the quiet Leningrad intellectual Putin is not such a bad option at all.

      > That is not the case, because as we know, government is a necessary evil,

      The descendants of the human refuse who fled across the ocean from their governments in order to escape prison or gallows (quite often, for real crime, unwillingness to pay debt, etc.) cannot think otherwise. But the descendants of law-abiding citizens view it differently.

      • No, just Russians, the Poles, Balts, Ukrainians and Georgians are all pretty good sorts in my experience.

        Russians on the other hand……. well there is the real human refuse ;)

      • Would you like to be one of the victims of that “very little bloodshed”?
        No, of course. Which doesn’t change the fact that it was very little. The other bloodsheds mentioned above were bigger. Didn’t you have math at school? They teach the concepts of ‘bigger’ and ‘smaller’ there in the first few classes, as I recall.

        The descendants of the human refuse who fled across the ocean from their governments ended up creating governments of their own. As you see, a necessary evil.

        I am still, by the way, curious about what Yeltsin was thinking when he chose Putin. I wonder if Yeltsin chose him, or if this choice was actually the result of some behind-the-scenes intrigue. There’s some work for future historians here (if they can manage to escape Medvedev’s commission, of course).

  14. No, but considering what is happening in Iran right now, I’ll take the Soviet Union’s demise.

    Putin is a “Byik”

    The US has the greatest economy and prosperity the world has ever seen. Amazing what free enterpise and liberty can produce instead of a Police State mentality of Russia

    • > considering what is happening in Iran right now, I’ll take the Soviet Union’s demise.

      Unlike spineless nincompoop Gorby, Ahmadinejad (like Teng Xiaoping 20 years ago) is a man with guts who makes no bones when it comes to protecting law and order from foreign influence agents.

      > The US has the greatest economy and prosperity the world has ever seen.

      The “prosperity” is based on the greatest total debt the world has ever seen: $ 57 TRILLION (http://mwhodges.home.att.net/nat-debt/debt-nat.htm). The “Only Hyperpower” aka the Shining City on the Hill aka the Indispensable Nation aka the Beacon of Democracy is BANKRUPT.

      • Hail Columbia

        So, those pro-democracy protesters in China circa 1989 and their latter-day counterparts in Iran were merely “foreign influence agents”? Well, I have no right to be surprised that a neanderthal like you looks down on them like that, since you want to believe that totalitarianism, managed “democracy” or not, is the only real way to live.

      • Boy, you must love Kim Jong-Il. Come to think of it, you must be very sad that Hitler didn’t defeat the Soviet Union. Ah, Hitler. There was a guy who had the guts to protect law and order from foreign influence. Unlike spineless nincompoop Putty, who even allows people like Kasparov and Kasyanov to go untortured. Ah Russia, to what level of depravity hast thou fallen!

  15. > Had there been a group of Russians similar to Jefferson, Adams and Franklin

    You mean, had there been a group of prosperous slaveowners? :-)

    Adams and Franklin did not own slaves. Second, Jefferson and Washington did, but freedom in their will. They knew the hypocrisy of the situation. They never tried to hide it.
    That is why when the constitution was drafted slaves were counted as 3/5 of a person. The founders knew this would be a problem for the South which wanted all the people counted for respresentation purposes. This 3/5 quandry help set off the Civil War.

    America has its warts but deals with them.

    Russia has bigger warts but doesn’t bother to address them or to compensate those injured. Serfs, Gulags, Age of Terror..

  16. The “prosperity” is based on the greatest total debt the world has ever seen: $ 57 TRILLION (http://mwhodges.home.att.net/nat-debt/debt-nat.htm). The “Only Hyperpower” aka the Shining City on the Hill aka the Indispensable Nation aka the Beacon of Democracy is BANKRUPT.

    We might be “bankrupt”. But I still got my Iphone, my hybrid, and sunny warm LA sunshine.

    You are driving around in a squealing Zaporozhets , making stops to use the telephone automat with your pockets full of dvooskas, and freezing your rear in subzero temperatures.

    • > and sunny warm LA sunshine.

      It’ll surely be of a help when you are kicked out of your home for being unable to pay mortgage. As to my vehicle, you a wrong, I also use an environment friendly means of transportation – a thoroughbred COMBAT BEAR raised on the flesh of dissidents! :-)))

      • Yes, one absolutely has to be kicked out if one cannot make his loan payments. If he cannot — he has no business owning a house and has to rent instead. That’s how this works

      • Eugene! Have you again let your bear poop all over your post? ;-)

      • Meanwhile, how’s that bank loan you took out for your Sony Erikson cellphone?

  17. Unlike spineless nincompoop Gorby, Ahmadinejad (like Teng Xiaoping 20 years ago) is a man with guts who makes no bones when it comes to protecting law and order from foreign influence agents.

    It is jerks like you that ruin Russia and all other countries you associate with.

    What a completely idiotic statement. Ahmadinejad has committed crimes against humanity. He is no better than Himmler. He has no legitimacy in his country. He only gets his legitimacy through the mullahs, who rule the country with an iron fist.

    Ruling with an iron fist means that the people are oppressed. And that arbitrary law supercedes the rule of law, which means that if you get on the bad side of the mullahs, you’re done. There is no justice. No court of appeals. No Gitmo protesters to get you out of prison. Such a society sucks. No freedom. No way to improve your condition except through servitude to the masters. You’re little pea brain can’t grasp these concepts. Too bad, serf.

  18. Yes there are. These countries have chosen to live under Sharia law by the consent of the people, not by the consent of the secret police.

  19. How many countries has Russia freed?

    How many countries has the US freed?

    How many countries has Russia enslaved?

    How many countries has US enslaved?

    You see what I am getting at here. You fascist pig.

    • Stop arguing with him. It’s useless and a total waste of breath. He indeed appears to be a bigot, judging just by his characterization of immigrants in Europe as “infestation” situation. Perhaps, it was a word of the day at the KGB Academy and he wanted to impress us with his English. Whatever.

  20. environment friendly means of transportation – a thoroughbred COMBAT BEAR raised on the flesh of dissidents.

    You’ve got to be kidding.
    Right?

    • No, he is just retarded.
      Poor Eugene, such a confused wee chap.

      • Actually, I think he’s just trying to pass the time here and have a good laugh. He is probably a mild-mannered, socially conventional accountant somewhere in the Midwest, who overcompensates for his uneventful life with Tough Guy words on the ‘net. Which is OK — it allows others to also have a good laugh.

  21. (Not exactly “with Iran” but rather “with Ahmadinejad”.)

    Clashes in Tehran as Hashemi Rafsanjani warns regime

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/jul/17/iran-hashemi-rafsanjani-islamic-republic

    His words were repeatedly interrupted by slogans from the rival camps as well as by whiffs of teargas fired by security forces and which drifted in from the surrounding streets. Hardliners chanted the traditional “death to America” while opposition supporters countered with azadi (freedom) as well as “death to Russia” – a reference to the government’s ties to Moscow.

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