EDITORIAL: Putin’s Russia is an Evil Empire

EDITORIAL

Putin’s Russia is an Evil Empire

Blogger David McDuff over at A Step at a Time ought to be required reading for U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as she tries to guide American policy towards the Evil Empire that is Vladimir Putin’s Russia under a hapless neophyte president.

McDuff points out that Hillary might be seen to have gotten off to a rocky start.  Leaving out a crucial “za” from the word “perezagruzka” in a “reset” button she tried to give her Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov as a joke, Hillary was made to appear clueless, reminding the world that during the presidential campaign that she had been unable to correctly prounce the Russian President’s last name.

But in fact, however, Hillary’s “mistakes” are leading her down exactly the right path. 

The word “peregruzka” means “overload,” not “reset,” and that’s exactly what Russia is doing in its relations with the United States — overloading them with hatred, bile, animosity and aggression — the same traits that characterize Russian policy towards every other nation on the planet (except maybe rogues like Nicaragua and Syria).  And there isn’t any reason to know the name of the “president” of Russia, because he no more rules the country than does the nation’s parliament. Both are nothing more than figureheads, rubber stamps for the proud KGB spy named Putin who really holds all the cards.

Meanwhile, as McDuff reminds us, Russia is reaching out towards both Iran and Al Quaeda, America’s two most mortal foes in the world today, directly threatening the most basic U.S. security interests — and doing so at a time when the U.S. president is both new and totally without foreign policy experience or credentials.  This makes Secretary Clinton an absolutely vital player in protecting not only the national security of the U.S. but also of the entire free world.  It’s somewhat comforting, then, that McDuff also reminds us that the Obama administration is now backing away from reports that it had proposed abandoning the missile defense shield in Eastern Europe in exchange for Russian help with Iran.  The administration must have felt rather humiliated when Russian security analysts confirmed that, in fact, even if Russia wanted to help control Iran it has virtually no meaningful leverage with the crazed fundamentalists who rule that rogue state.  And in fact, of course, Russia has no desire where America is concerned other than harm and destruction, as Garry Kasparov recently explained in the Wall Street Journal.

In Vladimir Putin’s Russia, the U.S. is confronted by a nation run by the KGB for more than a decade now — something it never had to come close to dealing with at any point during the first cold war.  And it faces the fact, perhaps even more daunting, that the KGB has been placed in charge by means of a plebescite, that it seems to enjoy overwhelming support in public opinon polls for measures like its brutal crackdown on critical media and its purge of opposition parties from the parliament.  In other words, America faces a Russia which is not only governed by an evil regime but a clan of spy-gangsters, a country that is not victimized by the behavior of those thugs but actively enabling and supporting them as they murder the country’s best and brightest, from Galina Starovoitova to Stanislav Markelov.

And by supporting the likes of Iran and Al Quaeda, Russia is offering a far more blunt and direct threat to Americans than the USSR ever did.  Not even when it sent nuclear missiles to Cuba was the Soviet Union supporting such rabidly anti-American maniacs as are found among the muslim fundamentalists, and say what you like about Nikita Khrushchev, at least he wasn’t a career Chekist.

The Other Russia reports that Russian “president” Dima Medvedev has just declared that opposition political groups are not welcome to express their views on Red Square, Russia’s main public gathering place for nearly a thousand years.  How, then, is the Kremlin’s policy towards dissent any different now than it was in Soviet times?  No different, and if anything its hostility to American values is even more intense.

It’s time the Obama administration realized that, and got down to the business of fighting and winning the new cold war that Russians declared on the U.S. when they chose to be led by the KGB.  The fact that Obama was willing to quickly correct his bizarre miscue on missle defense is encouraging, as is Clinton’s forceful reassurance that the U.S. still actively supports NATO membership for both Ukraine and Georgia.  Now, it’s time for the administration to begin speaking out against the worst excesses of Russia’s crackdown on human rights and civil society, just as Ronald Reagan did two decades ago.  It’s time for Obama to remember that doing so is not only in the best interests of Americans, but of all the people of Russia as well — and of the world.

 

 

46 responses to “EDITORIAL: Putin’s Russia is an Evil Empire

  1. “America faces [..] which is not only governed by an evil regime [..] / [..] country that is not victimized by the behavior of those thugs but actively enabling and supporting them [..]”

    Sounds like we are talking about Third Reich 60 years back then.

  2. Good article!!! Tnx.

  3. There seems to be some encouraging signs coming from the Obama administration. I wonder if the button really was a mistake? At any rate….I am not sure Russians are even capable of a democracy at this point in history. Like most in the West…I my first instinct is to think most Russians are good, decent people. But then you review on the anti democratic policies they support???? I think we may confuse European values with Russian values, simply based on appearance as Russians generally are caucasin. But when you look at the whole planet. Russian society is no more civilized than Africa or South America.

  4. If you want anything done with the Russians, don’t ask Hillary or Obama to do it.

  5. You people are too impatient. Russia is evolving, and Paul – trust your first instincts, they are always the best, don’t listen to the language of hate. This whole blog is a bolshevik blog in fact, and americans now are the biggest bolshies in the world. Their motto is as was the bolshies’ in the 1917: We will destroy the whole world and build a new and better one. Thats exactly what americans are trying to do in Iraq, Afghanistan and would like to do in Russia too, if they could. No matter at what cost – for the recipient country of course. Human rights, or paradise on earth, or any other noble goal – the end justifies the means. How different is this from the communist approach? Let countries live their own histories, at their own pace – yes help them, set an example, but any attempt at humiliating them, harrassing or outright occupation will be your defeat. The more so that simply not all people in the world want to live like you do. Are you too dense to just comprehend that? And – where are the 12,000 artifacts of 18,000 stolen from the Bagdad Museum? Return them to their legitimate place, then talk about thugs. So now Iraq is already not your mortal foe, now Iran is your mortal foe – are there even richer museums there? I bet whole armies of gangsters, and maybe the army itself, are getting ready big sacks for your next “fight for freedom”.

  6. Congratulations to La Russophobe, Kim Zigfeld and all who put it up on the internet and all who support it’s good work! Since I just now, today, took a quick look at “La Russophobe Exposed”…a pure Kremlin propaganda machine, mindless outlet, I now have even MORE respect for La Russophobe, and see proof that Moscow does indeed consider it as very dangerous to it’s criminal goals. And why?…because it tells the dirty TRUTH about currently enslaved Russia. Keep it up, and don’t stop telling the English speaking world, the rotten truth about Putin’s rotten-“Russia”, La Russophobe. When I want a hearty laugh, I can always read your, pathetic, detractors! Gee wizz!, the commuinsts were always SO unimaginative in their lying, and they are the same today too.
    Reader Daniel

  7. Bobby, the Iraqi artifacts were stolen by locals before US troops hit the ground and have been returned. They were found in Syria.

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,352775,00.html

    And, trust me, most Americans could care less how Russia atrophies as long as it posses no danger to us.

    What’s in it for you trolling around pretending to be Russian? And, how about using Google to verify the stupid comments you make before you utter them.

    You can do better.

  8. When the U.S. military first invaded Iraq’s capital, it decided to tread carefully around the museum, aware of its trove of priceless, centuries-old artifacts. But the insurgents had other ideas and fired on the invaders from the museum’s rooftop, drawing return fire that seriously damaged the building. In April 2003, looters ransacked the facility, making off with thousands of irreplaceable artifacts from a collection that dated back six millennia, encompassing the Assyrian and Babylonian empires. The thieves soon spirited the artifacts to other countries, notably Jordan, Syria and the United States.

    https://larussophobe.wordpress.com/2009/03/09/editorial-putins-russia-is-an-evil-empire/#comments

    The power of Google, Bobby. It’s your friend.

  9. Largely unstopped by U.S. troops, looters pillaged over 170,000 items from the National Archeological Museum of Baghdad on Saturday, stealing or destroying a priceless collection of artifacts from more than 10,000 years of history.
    Gibson said he and several other scholars, collectors and museum directors met with Pentagon officials in January to express concerns that the museum could be in danger if a conflict erupted in Baghdad. He said U.S. officials assured them the museum and others would be protected.
    According to the provisions of the 1954 Hague Convention, which updated the 1907 and 1899 rules of war, it is the responsibility of the occupying force to protect the cultural property of the occupied territory.

  10. Largely unstopped by U.S. troops, looters pillaged over 170,000 items from the National Archeological Museum of Baghdad on Saturday, stealing or destroying a priceless collection of artifacts from more than 10,000 years of history.
    Gibson said he and several other scholars, collectors and museum directors met with Pentagon officials in January to express concerns that the museum could be in danger if a conflict erupted in Baghdad. He said U.S. officials assured them the museum and others would be protected.
    According to the provisions of the 1954 Hague Convention, which updated the 1907 and 1899 rules of war, it is the responsibility of the occupying force to protect the cultural property of the occupied territory .

  11. American-led troops using the ancient Iraqi city of Babylon as a base have damaged and contaminated artifacts dating back thousands of years in one of the world’s most important archaeological sites, the British Museum said Saturday.

    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C03E1DB1538F935A25752C0A9639C8B63

    Since the 2003 invasion of Iraq, archaeological looting has become a major problem. Though some sites, such as Ur and Nippur, are protected by US and Coalition forces, most are not. Saddam Hussein treasured his national heritage immensely and acted to defend these sites and the artifacts within them; with the fall of his regime on 9 April 2003, these sites have been left completely open to looting.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeological_looting_in_Iraq

    Need any more? Try Google.

  12. But why bother? They have other treasures now : The Big Mac, the Spongebob anf the Coke

  13. Bobby,
    Much to your dismay, the McDonald’s corporation continues to grow all over the world, even during tough economic times. At least people like something American, unlike that which comes from Russia. Haven’t seen to many Russian restaurants any where.

    Let’s focus on looting that U.S. troops were unable to stop, compared to raping/looting/burning and killing by Russian troops in Georgia. What’s to compare? Sorry, we American’s just don’t know how to rape and pillage like you Russians. After your troops learn how to goose step, the next lesson must be raping and then pillaging. I forgot, it comes natural for you barbarians.

  14. Paul –

    Bobby’s right in one sense – your instincts are correct and Russians are, on the whole, good, decent people. The problem is that their government is in the hands of some of the least decent among them, and the goals of that specific cadre is the personal concentration of power and wealth.

    The reasons the Russian people are letting this happen fall into one of three categories.

    1) The Russian experience with democracy and capitalism so far has been less than sanguine, to put it mildly. The 90’s were an age of robber barons, and, as one historian put it, at least the American robber barons actually built something while they amassed all that wealth. Russians just saw the most fortunate among them get rich while they suffered. The Putin Era, on the contrary, has shown economic growth. Some of this is due to specific measures taken by the government – the flat tax, for instance, or the concentrated energy policy. Other parts of it had to do with the price of oil going up and staying up, much as in the USSR’s “halcyon” days of the 70s had. The problem is, as the crisis of the 80s showed, that good times don’t always last, and depending on one resource or industry leads to a certain level of volatility. Putin’s government may survive the current crash and it may not – much depends on how long it will last, and whether Russia can maneuver the coming crisis over its oligarchs’ large corporate debts.

    2) Similarly, Russia underwent a large decline in international prestige in the 90’s, which was similarly reversed under Putin. Part of this is that Putin was willing to be more assertive, part, again, is simply that he had the cash to do so.

    3) And finally, a lot of this just comes down to plain, good-old-fashioned nationalism. People of all nations (the US definitely included) don’t want to believe that their country might be wrong, so they’ll believe anything else. Russians are no exception. The US must have been behind NATO expansion – why would the nations of Eastern Europe want such a thing when working with Russia in the Warsaw Pact had such great benefits, and the policy of playing both sides against the middle that came before WWII worked even better? The US had to be behind the color revolutions – how could the people of Georgia and Ukraine possibly dislike the governments that came before even though the Shevardnadze government practically reduced the nation to failed state status and the Kuchma government’s only policy was to steal anything that wasn’t nailed down? (Given, it’s hard to beat Yushchenko when it comes to corruption, but somehow Kuchma managed.) I’m sure that if, God Forbid, the Iranian bomb gets in the hands of an angry Chechen or Ingushetian and a Russian city pays the price, people in Russia will somehow blame the US or Europe or Israel or China or San Marino for Iran’s developing the thing in the first place rather than look in the mirror and think that “Hey, maybe we shouldn’t have believed them when they said that Bushehr was just for peaceful energy development,” or even, “Hey, maybe we should have thought about this happening when Tel Aviv, New York, and Paris all blew up at the same time.” This isn’t just about Russia though, this is just human nature. Nationalism is a hard creature to beat, but if you want your country to be successful long-term, you have to do it.

  15. Oops – On the Warsaw Pact, “Working with Russia”, should read “Working with the USSR.”

  16. obamayomama – Who do you think looters sold those artifacts to? Each other? The market was right there – the occupying force – and it readily absorbed all that was looted.
    “Sorry, we American’s just don’t know how to rape ” – ever heard of Abu-Ghraib? Another one – “Wichita, Kansas: Tiller the Physician performs abortions for any reason on girls as young as ten, and often they are victims of predatory males over 18. Although statutory rape is a crime, men who seek out abortions for children receive special privileges and are protected under Kansas law”. Google, my friend.

    “Russian troops in Georgia” – the war in Georgia was over in 5 days; the war AND OCCUPATION of Iraq has been going on for 6 years.
    “McDonald’s corporation continues to grow all over the world, even during tough economic times” – do you know what other thing keeps growing even in tough times? It’s cancer.
    Come to think of it, any phobia is a desease including russophobia. You are sick people guys.

  17. Bobby,
    Get your facts right.
    Russian occupation forces are still in two parts of the UN recognised territory of Georgia.

    Russian forces have been assisting separatists to rape, murder and ethnicly cleanse Georgians from Abkhazia & South Ossetia since 1992.
    This is a war that has lasted for 17 years.

    And if you deny the crimes comitted by Russian troops and their separatist thugs you are the sick one.

  18. Bobby,

    “Sorry, we American’s just don’t know how to rape ” – ever heard of Abu-Ghraib?

    Yes, I did – why are you asking? Was anybody raped there? Phobia may or may no be a disease – is “naziphobia” a disease? Or “pindosophobia”?

    But your delusion certainly is a disease.

    obamayomama:

    After your troops learn how to goose step, the next lesson must be raping and then pillaging. I forgot, it comes natural for you barbarians.

    Colonel Yuri Budanov is Russian hero for raping and killing a Chechen woman. There are no other military accomplishments to his name. And while he was convicted for “involuntary manslaughter”, – rape wasn’t even a charge.

    And condescending Bobby is concerned about looting of Baghdad Museum (which, as I remember reading a few years later, turned out to be grossly exaggerated). And Russia is still negotiating with museums world-wide for the artifacts that were looted at the end of World War II.

  19. Andrew, Felix –
    “In the Winter Soldier investigation in Detroit on January 31 to February 2, 1971, Vietnam Veterans Against the War organized testimony by 109 discharged veterans and 16 civilians. John Kerry, later a US Senator and presidential candidate testified two months later in hearings at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee as representative of the Winter Soldier event. Kerry summed up the testimony:
    They had personally raped, cut off ears, cut off heads, taped wires from portable telephones to human genitals and turned up the power, cut off limbs, blown up bodies, randomly shot at civilians, razed villages in fashion reminiscent of Genghis Khan, shot cattle and dogs for fun, poisoned food stocks, and generally ravaged the countryside of South Vietnam. . .”

    Kerry continued: “We rationalized destroying villages in order to save them . . . . We learned the meaning of free fire zones, shooting anything that moves, and we watched while America placed a cheapness on the lives of orientals.”

    On March 13-16, 2008 a second Winter Soldier gathering took place in Washington DC, with hundreds of Iraq War veterans providing testimony, photographs and videos documenting brutality, torture and murder in cases such as the Haditha Massacre and the Abu Ghraib torture. [36] As in the first Winter Soldier, the mainstream media ignored the event organized by Iraq Veterans Against War. Again, however, the voices of these veterans have reached out to some through films and new electronic and broadcast media such as YouTube.

  20. Felix –
    Naziphobia – why, are you sorry for poor Nazis? Don’t be, they are Ok in America.

  21. Bobby,

    Russia has the biggest problem with violent Neo Nazi groups, stop being a 2 year old please.

    http://cpj.org/2009/02/neo-nazis-threaten-to-murder-journalists-in-russia.php
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,500053,00.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo-Nazi#Russia
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,901040809-674718,00.html
    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/15/world/europe/15russia.html
    http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/world-news/russian-neo-nazi-racist-groups-aping-jihadi-tactics-to-incite-holy-racial-war_100132851.html

    By the way regards the “winter soldier” business

    “Steve Pitkin controversy

    Veteran Steve Pitkin, who was 20 years old at the time, has claimed that he was not originally planning to testify at the WSI, but came to Detroit to support his fellow veterans and listen to live music. Pitkin has said he was only asked by event leaders to speak on the second day of the event; he has not indicated why he would have brought the documentation required of all speakers, including discharge papers, if he was not planning to testify. On the panel Pitkin criticized the press for its coverage of the war, and detailed what he considered poor training for combat in Vietnam, and low morale he claimed to have witnessed while there. Pitkin is quoted as saying he was later contacted by a reporter for Life Magazine who asked about war crimes and atrocities. “I didn’t tell him what he wanted to hear,” Pitkin is quoted as saying, and nothing he claims to have said was included in the final story. In August, 2004, 33 years after the Winter Soldier Investigation and during the 2004 presidential campaign season, Pitkin signed an affidavit stating “John Kerry and other leaders of that event pressured me to testify about American war crimes, despite my repeated statements that I could not honestly do so.”

    Upon hearing of these statements by Pitkin, another participant named Scott Camil filed his own affidavit refuting Pitkin’s statements. Pitkin has subsequently admitted his recollections were flawed, and has re-issued a second affidavit now reflecting a different date of discharge from the Army, different people traveling with him to the Winter Soldier event, and different circumstances under which he joined the VVAW [19]. On September 15, 2004, Pitkin signed a second affidavit stating that he had been instructed by organizers to “publicly state that I had witnessed incidents of rape, brutality, atrocities and racism, knowing that such statements would necessarily be untrue”. However, although he introduced himself by saying, “I’ll testify about the beating of civilians and enemy personnel, destruction of villages, indiscriminate use of artillery, the general racism and the attitude of the American GI toward the Vietnamese,” his actual testimony contained no such statements.”

    Seems they may have been bending the truth a little, although I am sure more incidents like Mi Lai did happen.

    However, historicaly Russian soldiers have been the most brutal rapists and murderes around.
    Look at all the rapes and murders of those they “liberated” from Nazi labor camps in Poland and Germany.

    Russian war crimes in WW2, particularly the rape and murder of civillians, and in Afghanistan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Abkhazia, South Ossetia, are all well documented and horrific reading.

    The main difference between Russian crimes and those of Americans is that a MINORITY of US soldiers commit crimes, while a MAJORITY or Russian soldiers do so, furthermore Russian crimes (such as the ethnic cleansing, murders and rapes in Abkhazia in 1992-94, and in South Ossetia in 2008) tend to be official policy.

  22. Bobby, geez.

    Abu Ghraib under US management (aka Abu Ghraib lite)? Check out the this:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komsomolskoye_massacre – not just photos, but actually a video of dead “amnestied” fighters and the living ones being abused – and most of them “disappeared”. It’s much worse stuff. But outrage, anywhere? None. Of course. Like there was no investigation WHATSOEVER into stuff like Samashki (My Lai at east wasn’t in US and not against “US civilians”): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samashki_massacre and such.

    What are you even talking about? Show me an example of the US forces slaughtering US citiziens (including random American civilians) during the same period (or even anytime anywhere since let’s say the end of WWII), then we’ll talk.

  23. Official investigation, of course.

    Now, Felix,

    Budanov, he got his Star of Geroy before the scandal for actually military “feats”. Check out an example of Budanov’s fairy tales: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D03E7DC1E3BF933A25752C0A9669C8B63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all (the reporter believes him for some reason). Now, I’ve seen the Chechen video of this battle (dawn of January 1, 2000 at Duba-Yurt). It was a Russian attempt to breakthrough Chechen lines, and it was them who were repelled – leaving many wrecks and bodies behind and even two armoured vehicles were captured intact. Some screencaps are here: http://thevoiceofthecaucasusbattles.blogspot.com/2008/12/battle-in-duba-yurt-01012000.html

    Budanov’s revenge when (after many weeks/months of positional fighting there) Duba-Yurt was at last captured?

    The Investigatory Department (ID) for Chechnya of the Investigatory Committee at the Prosecutor’s Office (ICPO) of Russia has instructed the Shali Inter-District Investigatory Department to start inquiry of involvement of Yuri Budanov, former commander of the 160th Tank Regiment, in kidnapping and murdering peaceful residents in Duba-Yurt village in 2000.
    http://www.eng.kavkaz-uzel.ru/articles/9317

  24. And what was going on in “filtration camps” Russia established for “Russian citziens” being “liberated” (from themselves)?
    http://www.amnesty.org.uk/news_details.asp?NewsID=12978
    http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/publisher,HRW,,RUS,3ae6a8750,0.html
    etc.

    OMON “liberators” (Putin’s term – http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/632767.stm) arriving in a Grozny suburb: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novye_Aldi_massacre

    Or just check out this:

    The villagers and Malik Saidullayev, one of the most prominent of pro-Moscow Chechen leaders, identified the soldiers responsible for the abuses as the unit under the command of Major-General Vladimir Shamanov. Despite his role in presiding over the abuses in Alkhan-Yurt, Shamanov received Russia’s highest honor, the Hero of Russia medal, on December 28, 1999, from the hands of the President of Russia Boris Yeltsin who described the army’s conduct in Chechnya as “faultless.”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkhan-Yurt_massacre

  25. And btw, an another prominent pro-Moscow Chechen leader (former Putin’s advisor, actually) about the Hero Shamanov:

    Aslambek Aslakhanov, a retired police general who is Chechnya’s pro-Kremlin representative in the Russian parliament, calls Shamanov a “butcher” and a “one-man curse on the Chechen people.” “Chechens talk about Shamanov like a plague that has descended on their heads, a disease like AIDS,” Aslakhanov said. “He is drowning in blood. He cynically believes that all Chechens–men and women, even children–are bandits.”
    http://articles.latimes.com/2001/jan/19/news/mn-14326

    From the same article, and what the avarage Russians think about such slaughter of (officially) fellow Russians?

    “Cruelty, cruelty,” mumbled Rimma Vasilyevna, a red-haired caretaker in this city’s grandiose Lenin Museum. “If Shamanov is cruel, it will probably be better for us. What we need is cruelty.”
    (…)
    At an Orthodox Christmas festival in Ulyanovsk’s town square, Venera Sokolova, 52, was charging 40 cents for a horse-and-sleigh ride. She has high hopes for Shamanov and said she had never heard about Alkhan-Yurt. “How can you avoid being cruel in a war?” she said, her iridescent pink lipstick glistening. “I’m sure he had to do what he did. I’m sure he had his reasons. And besides, we don’t know the real facts.” “War is war. Cruelty is part of it, isn’t it?” said Farit Avbazov, a 36-year-old construction worker at a nuclear power plant. “We need more people like Shamanov. Under him, people will do their work. A lot of the banditry we have here comes from Chechnya. First we have to solve the problem there, and then we can deal with the problem here.”

    But I guess you know this very well, beacuse you’re just like them.

    And yeas, this all happened in Chechnya, to quote your post:

    “They had personally raped, cut off ears, cut off heads, taped wires from portable telephones to human genitals and turned up the power, cut off limbs, blown up bodies, randomly shot at civilians, razed villages in fashion reminiscent of Genghis Khan, shot cattle and dogs for fun, poisoned food stocks, and generally ravaged the countryside of South [Russia].”

  26. I wrote about the Hero Shamanov in the previous post, which for some reason “is awaiting moderation”.

    And a very other example of Hero – the general who refused to become one for what he did: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lev_Rokhlin (surprise, surprise – he got shot).

    And of course there was also the farcical case of the Hero Yamadayev, “wanted for murder” (of a hostage he took for ransom) so much he became a high-profile commander during the invasion of Georgia.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulim_Yamadayev

  27. Politkovskaya on this issue:

    The essence of the ruling regime of a country is how it designates heroes. Who are the “Chechen” heroes? And what do we want in Chechnya? What are we doing there? What is our goal? Who are we rewarding for what? And what are we trying to achieve?
    http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/674320.html

  28. Now you people first agree what to blame me with: nazism or naziphobia, hero Budanov or hero Politkovskaya?
    Here is smth from your (western) mainstream media:
    Guardian.co.uk, August 18, 2008 (16 Syaaban 1429)

    This is a tale of US expansion not Russian aggression

    The outcome of six grim days of bloodshed in the Caucasus has triggered an outpouring of the most nauseating hypocrisy from western politicians and their captive media. As talking heads thundered against Russian imperialism and brutal disproportionality, US vice-president Dick Cheney, faithfully echoed by Gordon Brown and David Miliband, declared that “Russian aggression must not go unanswered”. George Bush denounced Russia for having “invaded a sovereign neighbouring state” and threatening “a democratic government”. Such an action, he insisted, “is unacceptable in the 21st century”.
    Could these by any chance be the leaders of the same governments that in 2003 invaded and occupied – along with Georgia, as luck would have it – the sovereign state of Iraq on a false pretext at the cost of hundreds of thousands of lives? Or even the two governments that blocked a ceasefire in the summer of 2006 as Israel pulverised Lebanon’s infrastructure and killed more than a thousand civilians in retaliation for the capture or killing of five soldiers?
    You’d be hard put to recall after all the fury over Russian aggression that it was actually Georgia that began the war last Thursday with an all-out attack on South Ossetia to “restore constitutional order” – in other words, rule over an area it has never controlled since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Nor, amid the outrage at Russian bombardments, have there been much more than the briefest references to the atrocities committed by Georgian forces against citizens it claims as its own in South Ossetia’s capital Tskhinvali. Several hundred civilians were killed there by Georgian troops last week, along with Russian soldiers operating under a 1990s peace agreement: “I saw a Georgian soldier throw a grenade into a basement full of women and children,” one Tskhinvali resident, Saramat Tskhovredov, told reporters on Tuesday.
    Might it be because Georgia is what Jim Murphy, Britain’s minister for Europe, called a “small beautiful democracy”. Well it’s certainly small and beautiful, but both the current president, Mikheil Saakashvili, and his predecessor came to power in western-backed coups, the most recent prettified as a “Rose revolution”. Saakashvili was then initially rubber-stamped into office with 96% of the vote before establishing what the International Crisis Group recently described as an “increasingly authoritarian” government, violently cracking down on opposition dissent and independent media last November. “Democratic” simply seems to mean “pro-western” in these cases.
    The long-running dispute over South Ossetia – as well as Abkhazia, the other contested region of Georgia – is the inevitable consequence of the breakup of the Soviet Union. As in the case of Yugoslavia, minorities who were happy enough to live on either side of an internal boundary that made little difference to their lives feel quite differently when they find themselves on the wrong side of an international state border.
    Such problems would be hard enough to settle through negotiation in any circumstances. But add in the tireless US promotion of Georgia as a pro-western, anti-Russian forward base in the region, its efforts to bring Georgia into Nato, the routing of a key Caspian oil pipeline through its territory aimed at weakening Russia’s control of energy supplies, and the US-sponsored recognition of the independence of Kosovo – whose status Russia had explicitly linked to that of South Ossetia and Abkhazia – and conflict was only a matter of time.
    The CIA has in fact been closely involved in Georgia since the Soviet collapse. But under the Bush administration, Georgia has become a fully fledged US satellite. Georgia’s forces are armed and trained by the US and Israel. It has the third-largest military contingent in Iraq – hence the US need to airlift 800 of them back to fight the Russians at the weekend. Saakashvili’s links with the neoconservatives in Washington are particularly close: the lobbying firm headed by US Republican candidate John McCain’s top foreign policy adviser, Randy Scheunemann, has been paid nearly $900,000 by the Georgian government since 2004.
    But underlying the conflict of the past week has also been the Bush administration’s wider, explicit determination to enforce US global hegemony and prevent any regional challenge, particularly from a resurgent Russia.

  29. Georgians didn’t do any massacre during the 2008 war. Read the HRW report where they debunk the Russian fairy tales of people being “burned in churches”,” 1600″ or “2000” killed (in few hours) during the “genocide” and what not.
    http://www.hrw.org/en/reports/2009/01/22/flames-0
    And most of these
    “several hundred civilians” were Ossetian policemen/KGB-men and especially militiamen.

    About indiscriminate fire, take a look what Putin’s Russia did while “restoring consitutional order” in Chechnya:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grozny_ballistic_missile_attack
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombing_of_Katyr-Yurt
    It’s only two of many examples, just maybe the worst.

  30. and thats the real answer: the US wants impunity for itself in all world conflicts, while passing judgments on everybody. Second – it wants world hegemony and does not hesitate to instill and incite hatred to whole nations in its population in the process, which is FASCISM PURE AND SIMPLE. First iraqophobia, then you kill iraqis and don’t have any qualms. Iranophobia – and you are killing them for the human race’s sake. Russophobia – and you fighting the empire of evil where even children should die because Russians are evil by nature. As an aside: agreed that there is a feeling like that to Chechens in Russia too. It is a popular attitude, but NOT A OFFICIAL ONE by far. On the opposite, people are indignant at how much money and other help the government is pouring onto Chechnya, when the soldiers crippled in the war with the rebels are sometimes forgotten completely. At the overall and indiscriminate amnesty that was applied to chechen rebels, but the pursecution of the state army soldieres continuing to this day).
    Fascism has become the official US policy, while we in Russia maybe have a rare chance of seeing it in the streets (far rarer than say in Germany or Estonia). The US is not a member of any international juducial body because it KNOWS FOR SURE it would have been indicted multiple times. I won’t engage in this senseless finger-pointing, my point is – you better look after your own affairs, and the world will look after its own. Everybody will be a lot happier.

  31. And cease your “and you are lynching Negroes” tactics, it’s really pathetic.

    You know, I don’t remember Americans defending the Gitmo abuses by saying “but abuse in prisons and detention centers in Russia is much worse”. Which is of course true, but is also so completely unrelated.

    Unless we are speaking about the Russian Gitmo prisoners, who didn’t wanted to be extradided home and their families pleaded them to stay in US custody – and one still fights to stay there:
    http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/country,,,,DEU,4562d8b62,4982d6bf1a,0.html

  32. “First iraqophobia, then you kill iraqis and don’t have any qualms.”

    Yeah. Being sentenced to merely 90 and 100 years in prison (even if the victims were not US citiziens!) is the highest award American soldiers may receive.
    http://english.pravda.ru/world/87701-us-soldier-0 (yes, it’s a link to Pravda)

    “Iranophobia – and you are killing them for the human race’s sake.”

    What?

    “On the opposite, people are indignant at how much money and other help the government is pouring onto Chechnya”

    So, do you think the Russia should be totally not helping this part of Russia, after it was completely destroyed and some 100-200,000 Russian citiziens killed or “disappeared” by Russian troops (and even more injured, abucted, tortured, raped – in the territory populated by 1 only million people)?

    “At the overall and indiscriminate amnesty that was applied to chechen rebels,”

    If not these amnesties (and then hiring as mercenaries), you would lose the war already. Heck, they even won the war with Georgia for you.

    “but the pursecution of the state army soldieres continuing to this day).”

    What is “pursecution”? Purring at someone?

    Are you “I am Russian” under another name, or are you just another troll/idiot? I guess I’ll just ignore you since now.

  33. Re: “Pursecution”

    http://www.pursecution.com/

    If they are making purses out of their own soldiers, well, I agree: it’s really horrible and Russia is even more horrible country than I thought. It’s kinda like http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2511/did-the-nazis-make-lampshades-out-of-human-skin Gee!

  34. Bobby,

    You complain others spout “hate filled propaganda” against Russians, but as Robert rightly pointed out, you spout hate filled (and debunked by HRW, Memorial, the OSCE & UN) Russian propaganda about Georgia.

    I guess in true Russian fashion, what you really mean when you say “you better look after your own affairs, and the world will look after its own. Everybody will be a lot happier.”
    Is that you want the world to look the other way while Russia rapes, murders and destroys in the Caucasus.
    You are a typical Russian bigot and hypocrite.

  35. Bobby,
    Speaking of McDonald’s, it seems some of your troops would rather check out the other side while gorging himself on a burger at a McDonalds then enjoy the great cuisine of the Russian army. Oh, wait a minute, armies aren’t supposed to eat well, especially the Russian army. Unfortunately your officer’s are selling your rations and equipment to enrich themselves, what a country! Guess that’s the Russian concept of capitalism, no wonder things are such a mess. Until Russia adopts the concepts of law and order from the bottom to the top, your nation will remain in the sewer of corruption that we see today. These statements are not of hate, but of reality.

  36. Come on people, I love you all, and you call me idiot all the time and looking out for my typos :). I don’t take offence though.
    As to the subject matter here:
    “you spout hate filled Russian propaganda ” Never did I cite a russian source here (you wouldn’t understand anyway). It’s not my word against yours, it’s Guardian, Jim Kerry, Vietnam veterans, Noam Chomsky’s etc word against yours. All are English speaking sources thinking differently. Google is at your service as someone rightly pointed out. Why am I here fighting windmills as it were? Because you, or some CIA “thugs” using the word you like, or never mind who – have set up this site. In Russia, it’s a crime to run sites or other publications inciting national or ethnic hate because it is fascism. Not so in America it seems (or whatever other part of the “free world” it is). “Russians are idiots! Yes, they are. Russians are thugs! Yes they are. They rape poor Georgians (thats our Negroes for you)! Yes they do”. Boring. I at least point out to you that you are engaged in fascism, thinking like fascists.
    There are people like you in Russia (not me:)). But they will never (hopefully) be allowed to set up and run such publications.
    Russian not wanting to go home from Gitmo. Well he is afraid of what? Of being indicted and going to prison. Now don’t tell me you have somehow come to sympathize with the people (“enemy combatants”!) you illegally held for years. Did you set free all the others? Did you listen much to their families before? No you didn’t. You probably didn’t even know they had any families, or didn’t care. Well now he sensed that he can use your hatred to Russia and walk away right to the German pub. And laugh at you stupid americans and us russians together. Or maybe you yourself are preparing the public because you just don’t want the details of his stay to come up in the Russian court. Or maybe you are ashamed and try to make up for what you did to him (hardly though).
    That said, I must admit that the Russian “justice” system is far from ideal, many indictments are unfair; and especially the conditions of preliminary (pre-trial) detention are awful. That’s reason for work, not for hate.
    For example, Canadians have been working here for years setting up a juvenile justice system in Russia, and we can feel only gratitude for that. So, don’t you try to identify youself with the west: US is different. We love the west but we don’t like bullies around.

  37. Russia certainly likes bullying Georgia, and as for not being allowed to run publications that incite racial hatred, the barrage of anti Georgian news articles and racist slander on “Russia Today”, RTV1 etc in the months leading up to the war kind of put a big hole in that theory.

  38. Now you people first agree what to blame me with: nazism or naziphobia, hero Budanov or hero Politkovskaya?

    only for being an idiot.
    Just like Russian government, for some reason you want to be hated. It really pisses you off that America doesn’t hate Upper Volta, nor “Upper Volta with missiles” (aka Russia). It’s funny to watch you pretend (or maybe really delude yourself into believing) that Russia is playing in a big league.

    Russia really need to choose partners of equal stature (Indonesia, Nigeria, Venezuela) – otherwise your handicap becomes pathetically obvious.

  39. Now you people first agree what to blame me with: nazism or naziphobia, hero Budanov or hero Politkovskaya?

    only for being an idiot.
    Just like Russian government, for some reason you want to be hated. It really pisses you off that America doesn’t hate Upper Volta, nor “Upper Volta with missiles” (aka Russia). It’s funny to watch you pretend (or maybe really delude yourself into believing) that Russia is playing in a big league.

    Russia really need to choose partners of equal stature (Indonesia, Nigeria, Venezuela) – otherwise your handicap becomes pathetically obvious.

  40. Felix and Andrew,
    Very much enjoy reading your posts. I consider you both to be very credible sources of information and your perspectives are right on. To your health!
    Cheers!

  41. Bobby,
    If you want to know what’s REALLY going on in the world, the last person I would quote would be Noam Chomsky. He’s a rabid communist/anti-American/anti-human, blithering idiot. I wouldn’t trust him in a toilet with a spoon, and neither should any thinking person. Try reading something beside’s anti-American material. In a free society, we aren’t afraid to allow these morons to shovel their drivel, because the truth can be found right around the next corner, if a person is interested in finding it.

  42. Re: Georgian “war crimes”

    2.6 Russian Allegations against Georgia of Genocide and Other War Crimes
    http://www.hrw.org/en/node/79681/section/14

    “Russia’s Allegations Not Supported by Available Evidence”

    And that’s all regarding these fairy tales.

    As of “several hundred” (sic) in the article by the “western mainstream media” idiot Seumas Milne (in The Guardian’s “comment is free” blog section), even the later official Russian figures were lower, that is eventually only 162 individuals. The other list that contained 365 individuals classified members of the militias as “civilians” (I’m not surprised at all) and listed only 74 females, 37 elderly men and 7 children (so 162 actual civilians would make sense).
    http://www.hrw.org/en/node/79681/section/15

    Seems that at least 200 South Ossetian combatants were killed according to these official Russian tallies, and really77 many more (203 “civilian” militiamen + unknown losses of South Ossetian MVD & KGB + unknown losses of the “Ossetian peacekeeper battalion” + unknown losses of the volunteers from North Ossetia and the rest of Russia).

    Re: Noam Chomsky,

    I think he’s much smarter than “Bobby” is (and yes, he was the guy the Khmer Rouge invited to tour their Workers’ Paradise, for example).

  43. John Kerry?????!!!!!LOL!!!!!ROFL!!!!!! He may have gotten himself a senator’s seat but he has little else going for him.

    http://www.swiftvets.com/index.php?topic=WarCrimes

    I’m not sure how you all get your blue hyperlinks to work on this site, but Bobby, PLEASE go to that site and read what these vets have to say about J.Kerry’s allegations about rape and pillage by US soldiers. My personal opinion of Sen. Kerry does not even register. And please remember, Lt. Calley, who was court martialed for My Lai (spelling?) The U.S. does not condone, nor does it look the other way, when attrocities are commited by our troops.

  44. Re: William Calley

    It may be unbelievable now, but back then in 1970 even the anti-war people (and gov. Jimmy Carter of all people!) supported Calley after he was sentenced. This is why Nixon pardoned him. And this was not without reason, because (while of course a multiple murderer) he was actually really singled-out for blame…

    And the Russian anti-war people have now a similiar “scapegoat hero” in this “policeman” fellow http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Babin (and again it’s even quite reasonable, because why one accused murderer and all of them and/or their superiors?).

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