Daily Archives: May 8, 2007

Vedemosti on Estonia

A reader claiming to represent a group of Georgians wishing to express solidarity with their oppressed brethren in Estonia sends La Russophobe the logo (above) and the following manifesto:

  • The relocation of the statue of a Red Army occupier with respect to history is the internal business of Estonia and no other state can intervene to this with demand for the government to resign;
  • Russian press unmercifully perverts information about conflict in Estonia and is actively creating image of Baltic States as enemy of Russia;
  • Russia is engaged in chauvinistic and ultra-nationalistic hysteria against the free, democratic and European Estonia;
  • Russia has demonstrated intolerance for the freedom of its neighbours and used radical neo-nazi youth movement “nashi” to wage series of attacks on Estonian embassy and staff through provocations and aggression;
  • We fully support Estonian state and Estonian nation in their heroic stance against the emerging neo-imperialistic fascist state which present a greater threat for the security and stability in Europe and beyond.
  • Lithuania Latvia Georgia, European Union and all democratic states of the world should express their full support for Estonia in no uncertain terms because the same thing may happen to all of the countries which are involved with Russia.

Meanwhile, the Russian business daily Vedemosti, analagous to America’s Wall Street Journal, has the following to say about Russia’s failed policy in Estonia and increasing neo-Soviet isolation:

It is starting to look as if official Moscow, without hope of any discernable political benefit, is glad for any opportunity to argue with its neighbors. This chance to stand up to its neighbors may make it possible for officials to talk about the recovery of Russia’s place on the world stage, but the reality is that it’s position is worsening: Over the past few years, measure of attitudes toward Russia in the West have plunged into the negatives, and post-Soviet republics have been transformed into enemies. Ignoring the technical date for the break up of the Soviet Union, the real and final disintegration has come in the first decade of the 21st century. With each new conflict the former Soviet republics move further away from being abstract enemies for Russians and toward being real foreign policy opponents for the country.

The roots of the conflict with Estonia all lie in the past. Russia’s foreign policy looks like a holdover from the Soviet variety, and those responsible for making it live in a “cold” world, surrounded by enemies. Economic recovery and the strengthening of Russia’s position on the international arena have had the ironic effect of narrowing the world surrounding the country to the geographic borders of the state.

For Russia to hope to have more friends in a world that has broadened, and not narrowed, it needs an entirely different foreign policy that is oriented toward the future with an understanding of the past.

Besides its Soviet and imperial heritage, Russia has a multitude of cards to play that would allow it to act effectively on the international stage, including its location, the state of its economy and, perhaps most important, its great cultural tradition.

But to start living in the future, the past has to be transformed from a stumbling block to a common understanding. In order to chase away the ghosts of the past, you first have to reconcile yourself with them.

As long as Russians continue to turn a blind eye to parts of the history of Soviet repression — living peacefully with both Stalin’s national anthem and the two-headed eagle, with Lenin’s body on Red Square and Tsar Nicholas II canonized — the past will only continue to get in their way.

Annals of Russian Hypocrisy: The Leningradskoye Pilots

Yesterday, we reported that despite screaming to high heaven about Estonians “discriminating” against Russians by forcing them to learn Estonian if they live in Estonia, Russians were going to require foreigners to learn Russian. And the neo-Soviet hypocrisy just keeps right on coming! The Moscow Times reports that althogh the Kremlin wails to high heaven about Estonians digging up Soviet graves in their capital to relocate them, it’s doing EXACTLY the same thing ITSELF in Moscow, ignoring protests by Russians. How neo-Soviet can you get? And where were all the hoards of screaming Nashi “patriots”? Nowhere to be found.

The remains of six Soviet pilots dug up from a memorial along Leningradskoye Shosse last month were reburied in a Khimki cemetery Sunday. This was the third time that the pilots’ remains have been reburied; the other two times were on the 20th and 40th anniversaries of the May 9 holiday commemorating the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, Alexander Mustafin, who designed a new memorial to the pilots, said by telephone. Khimki military commissioner Vladislav Yurkovsky said the pilots had been buried with military honors and — for the first time — in line with Russian Orthodox practice, Interfax reported. About 1,000 people gathered for the reburial ceremony in the Novoluzhinskoye Cemetery. The old memorial to the pilots is still alongside Leningradskoye Shosse and will be restored for the Victory Day holiday this week, said Sergei Fateyev, a Moscow region legislator. “No one can talk about any sacrilege or desecration” toward the pilots’ remains, Fateyev said, Interfax reported. “The reburial was conducted very carefully.” Dozens of Communist supporters rallied against the reburial late last month, calling it a sacrilege, especially in light of Moscow’s indignation over Estonia’s decision to exhume the remains of Soviet soldiers and move them and a war memorial across Tallinn.

The administration of Khimki, located on Moscow’s northern outskirts, allowed the reburial after war veterans complained that prostitutes were hanging around the old site along Leningradskoye Shosse. Authorities also want to widen the highway.

Yup, You Heard Right: They’re Bringing the Tanks back to Red Square

The Moscow Times reports:

In a nod to Soviet-era festivities, tanks and missile launchers may return to Red Square during military parades, General Vladimir Bakin said Friday. The absence of military technology from festive marches in Red Square is temporary and was caused by a lack of funding, said Bakin, commander of the Moscow Military District. “The issue is being discussed. We have enough to showcase,” he told reporters. Bakin will be in command of the Victory Day parade Wednesday on Red Square. Until a few years ago, trucks and cruise missiles trundled across the cobbled square past a viewing platform that featured the head of state and prominent politicians. At the height of the Cold War, military jets thundered above the heads of goose-stepping troops and veterans emblazoned with medals showcasing the Soviet Union’s military might. Bakin said foreign military representatives used to come to Moscow to film or take pictures of the military hardware. In In honor of Victory Day, the Moscow metro will have war and victory songs, as well as poetry, playing over loudspeakers in all stations on Wednesday, metro spokeswoman Nadezhda Sokolova told Ekho Moskvy radio on Friday.

Yup, You Heard Right: They’re Bringing the Tanks back to Red Square

The Moscow Times reports:

In a nod to Soviet-era festivities, tanks and missile launchers may return to Red Square during military parades, General Vladimir Bakin said Friday. The absence of military technology from festive marches in Red Square is temporary and was caused by a lack of funding, said Bakin, commander of the Moscow Military District. “The issue is being discussed. We have enough to showcase,” he told reporters. Bakin will be in command of the Victory Day parade Wednesday on Red Square. Until a few years ago, trucks and cruise missiles trundled across the cobbled square past a viewing platform that featured the head of state and prominent politicians. At the height of the Cold War, military jets thundered above the heads of goose-stepping troops and veterans emblazoned with medals showcasing the Soviet Union’s military might. Bakin said foreign military representatives used to come to Moscow to film or take pictures of the military hardware. In In honor of Victory Day, the Moscow metro will have war and victory songs, as well as poetry, playing over loudspeakers in all stations on Wednesday, metro spokeswoman Nadezhda Sokolova told Ekho Moskvy radio on Friday.

Yup, You Heard Right: They’re Bringing the Tanks back to Red Square

The Moscow Times reports:

In a nod to Soviet-era festivities, tanks and missile launchers may return to Red Square during military parades, General Vladimir Bakin said Friday. The absence of military technology from festive marches in Red Square is temporary and was caused by a lack of funding, said Bakin, commander of the Moscow Military District. “The issue is being discussed. We have enough to showcase,” he told reporters. Bakin will be in command of the Victory Day parade Wednesday on Red Square. Until a few years ago, trucks and cruise missiles trundled across the cobbled square past a viewing platform that featured the head of state and prominent politicians. At the height of the Cold War, military jets thundered above the heads of goose-stepping troops and veterans emblazoned with medals showcasing the Soviet Union’s military might. Bakin said foreign military representatives used to come to Moscow to film or take pictures of the military hardware. In In honor of Victory Day, the Moscow metro will have war and victory songs, as well as poetry, playing over loudspeakers in all stations on Wednesday, metro spokeswoman Nadezhda Sokolova told Ekho Moskvy radio on Friday.

Yup, You Heard Right: They’re Bringing the Tanks back to Red Square

The Moscow Times reports:

In a nod to Soviet-era festivities, tanks and missile launchers may return to Red Square during military parades, General Vladimir Bakin said Friday. The absence of military technology from festive marches in Red Square is temporary and was caused by a lack of funding, said Bakin, commander of the Moscow Military District. “The issue is being discussed. We have enough to showcase,” he told reporters. Bakin will be in command of the Victory Day parade Wednesday on Red Square. Until a few years ago, trucks and cruise missiles trundled across the cobbled square past a viewing platform that featured the head of state and prominent politicians. At the height of the Cold War, military jets thundered above the heads of goose-stepping troops and veterans emblazoned with medals showcasing the Soviet Union’s military might. Bakin said foreign military representatives used to come to Moscow to film or take pictures of the military hardware. In In honor of Victory Day, the Moscow metro will have war and victory songs, as well as poetry, playing over loudspeakers in all stations on Wednesday, metro spokeswoman Nadezhda Sokolova told Ekho Moskvy radio on Friday.

Yup, You Heard Right: They’re Bringing the Tanks back to Red Square

The Moscow Times reports:

In a nod to Soviet-era festivities, tanks and missile launchers may return to Red Square during military parades, General Vladimir Bakin said Friday. The absence of military technology from festive marches in Red Square is temporary and was caused by a lack of funding, said Bakin, commander of the Moscow Military District. “The issue is being discussed. We have enough to showcase,” he told reporters. Bakin will be in command of the Victory Day parade Wednesday on Red Square. Until a few years ago, trucks and cruise missiles trundled across the cobbled square past a viewing platform that featured the head of state and prominent politicians. At the height of the Cold War, military jets thundered above the heads of goose-stepping troops and veterans emblazoned with medals showcasing the Soviet Union’s military might. Bakin said foreign military representatives used to come to Moscow to film or take pictures of the military hardware. In In honor of Victory Day, the Moscow metro will have war and victory songs, as well as poetry, playing over loudspeakers in all stations on Wednesday, metro spokeswoman Nadezhda Sokolova told Ekho Moskvy radio on Friday.