Daily Archives: March 19, 2007

LR Wants YOUR Opinion

La Russophobe has finalized a draft for the design of the blog on the WordPress.com server. Click here to see it. As previously noted, this blog was created to backup the content of this blog on a different server and all of the archives have been uploaded for this purpose — but it could just as easily become the primary blog, with current content being posted there rather than here. LR really doesn’t care where to place her content, so she might as well accommodate her readrs.

So LR would like YOUR opinion: Should she move the current content WordPress, or stay here on Blogger.com?

There are really only two factors for you to consider: (1) The WordPress blog looks nothing like this one. Which one do you prefer to look at? Which one makes the content easier to view and access? (2) There’s a tradeoff: WordPress allows posts with “jump” pages, meaning only part of long posts has to be displayed on the home page. This means less scrolling, and LR publishes lots of long pages, so it could be a big benefit. On Blogger, the whole post has to be displayed on the home page, which means more scrolling. However, for security reasons (WordPress is a very hard target), WordPress doesn’t allow embedding of YouTube video screens (or any other interactive content, such as polls like the one below). If LR moves to WordPress, she can only link you to YouTube videos of interest and poll pages, not show them to you directly.

So what do you think? Should LR move to WordPress, or stay here on Blogger? Vote now.

Should La Russophobe remain on Blogger or move to WordPress?
Stay at Blogger
Move to WordPress
Free polls from Pollhost.com

If you think the WordPress design could be improved, we’d love to hear from you in the comments section.

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Another Russian Plane Goes Down

Yet another Russian airliner has crashed, killing at least seven of the nearly 60 passengers. The Observer reports: “At least seven people died and 23 were injured when an airliner crash-landed in fog yesterday in the city of Samara, 550 miles southeast of Moscow. Aministry spokeswoman said the Russian Tu-134 carrying 57 people grazed the runway with a wing. ‘Its fuselage then collapsed and it crashed,’ she said.” RIA Novosti continued:

Media reports that a Tu-134 plane that crashed in southern Russia Saturday, killing six people, was technically unsafe are untrue, the press office of the air company that owns the plane said Sunday. The Tu-134 jet liner, en route from the West Siberian town of Surgut, had 50 passengers and seven crewmen on board when it crash-landed in foggy weather in the Volga city of Samara Saturday morning. Twenty-one people, including four crewmen, were hospitalized. “Some media reports that the TU-134 plane allegedly had defects do not correspond to reality. The plane, before it hit the ground, was technically fit and met airworthiness and maintenance standards applicable to this type of aircraft,” the press office of UTAir said. A sudden deterioration of weather conditions, which was confirmed by a report filed immediately after the crash, could have been a possible reason for the crash, the press office said.The Transportation Ministry said Saturday UTAir had decided to pay $75,000 to each family of those killed in the crash. Transportation Minister Igor Levitin said in February the aging Russian medium-haul airliners Tu-154 and Tu-134 would be phased out of commercial use within the next five years. The Russian government has recently launched projects to replace the old Tu-154 and Tu-134 models with more technologically advanced SuperJet-100 and MS-21 mid-haulers. But these aircraft will not enter service until 2012.

LR has previously documented the horrors of Russia’s very unfriendly skies. The photo above is from the scene of the crash of a Tupalev-154 while flying from the Russian Black Sea holiday resort of Anapa to St Petersburg in August 2006.

The Maximum Outrage of Russia’s Minimum Wage

In the United States, one must generally be paid at least $7 per hour for work (in New York the minimum is $7.15 and in California it’s $7.50). That means a full time job must result in wage of roughly $1,100 per month.

The Russian Duma has recently passed a bill raising their minimum wage substantially. In May, the minimum wage will rise from 1,100 rubles per month to 1,400. By September, it is supposed to reach 2,300 rubles.

1,400 rubles translates to $55 and 2,300 equals roughly $90 per month. In other words, by September of this year, if they’re lucky and the government actually follows through on this measure, Russian minium wage earners will be able to expect about $25 per week or $5 per workday or $0.60 per hour. That’s a dream come true, because right now they are getting $0.25 per hour.

In other words, once the Duma’s radical increase of Russia’s minimum wage takes effect, an American minimum wage worker will earn more income in a lucky 13 hours than a Russian minimum wage earner will take home in a whole month of 160 hours. The American minimum wage is more than ten times higher than Russia’s. So much for the idea that all that oil income is turning Russia into a prosperous nation.

The Maximum Outrage of Russia’s Minimum Wage

In the United States, one must generally be paid at least $7 per hour for work (in New York the minimum is $7.15 and in California it’s $7.50). That means a full time job must result in wage of roughly $1,100 per month.

The Russian Duma has recently passed a bill raising their minimum wage substantially. In May, the minimum wage will rise from 1,100 rubles per month to 1,400. By September, it is supposed to reach 2,300 rubles.

1,400 rubles translates to $55 and 2,300 equals roughly $90 per month. In other words, by September of this year, if they’re lucky and the government actually follows through on this measure, Russian minium wage earners will be able to expect about $25 per week or $5 per workday or $0.60 per hour. That’s a dream come true, because right now they are getting $0.25 per hour.

In other words, once the Duma’s radical increase of Russia’s minimum wage takes effect, an American minimum wage worker will earn more income in a lucky 13 hours than a Russian minimum wage earner will take home in a whole month of 160 hours. The American minimum wage is more than ten times higher than Russia’s. So much for the idea that all that oil income is turning Russia into a prosperous nation.

The Maximum Outrage of Russia’s Minimum Wage

In the United States, one must generally be paid at least $7 per hour for work (in New York the minimum is $7.15 and in California it’s $7.50). That means a full time job must result in wage of roughly $1,100 per month.

The Russian Duma has recently passed a bill raising their minimum wage substantially. In May, the minimum wage will rise from 1,100 rubles per month to 1,400. By September, it is supposed to reach 2,300 rubles.

1,400 rubles translates to $55 and 2,300 equals roughly $90 per month. In other words, by September of this year, if they’re lucky and the government actually follows through on this measure, Russian minium wage earners will be able to expect about $25 per week or $5 per workday or $0.60 per hour. That’s a dream come true, because right now they are getting $0.25 per hour.

In other words, once the Duma’s radical increase of Russia’s minimum wage takes effect, an American minimum wage worker will earn more income in a lucky 13 hours than a Russian minimum wage earner will take home in a whole month of 160 hours. The American minimum wage is more than ten times higher than Russia’s. So much for the idea that all that oil income is turning Russia into a prosperous nation.

The Maximum Outrage of Russia’s Minimum Wage

In the United States, one must generally be paid at least $7 per hour for work (in New York the minimum is $7.15 and in California it’s $7.50). That means a full time job must result in wage of roughly $1,100 per month.

The Russian Duma has recently passed a bill raising their minimum wage substantially. In May, the minimum wage will rise from 1,100 rubles per month to 1,400. By September, it is supposed to reach 2,300 rubles.

1,400 rubles translates to $55 and 2,300 equals roughly $90 per month. In other words, by September of this year, if they’re lucky and the government actually follows through on this measure, Russian minium wage earners will be able to expect about $25 per week or $5 per workday or $0.60 per hour. That’s a dream come true, because right now they are getting $0.25 per hour.

In other words, once the Duma’s radical increase of Russia’s minimum wage takes effect, an American minimum wage worker will earn more income in a lucky 13 hours than a Russian minimum wage earner will take home in a whole month of 160 hours. The American minimum wage is more than ten times higher than Russia’s. So much for the idea that all that oil income is turning Russia into a prosperous nation.

The Maximum Outrage of Russia’s Minimum Wage

In the United States, one must generally be paid at least $7 per hour for work (in New York the minimum is $7.15 and in California it’s $7.50). That means a full time job must result in wage of roughly $1,100 per month.

The Russian Duma has recently passed a bill raising their minimum wage substantially. In May, the minimum wage will rise from 1,100 rubles per month to 1,400. By September, it is supposed to reach 2,300 rubles.

1,400 rubles translates to $55 and 2,300 equals roughly $90 per month. In other words, by September of this year, if they’re lucky and the government actually follows through on this measure, Russian minium wage earners will be able to expect about $25 per week or $5 per workday or $0.60 per hour. That’s a dream come true, because right now they are getting $0.25 per hour.

In other words, once the Duma’s radical increase of Russia’s minimum wage takes effect, an American minimum wage worker will earn more income in a lucky 13 hours than a Russian minimum wage earner will take home in a whole month of 160 hours. The American minimum wage is more than ten times higher than Russia’s. So much for the idea that all that oil income is turning Russia into a prosperous nation.