Daily Archives: December 16, 2006

The Russian People: What’s WRONG with Them?

The Moscow Times reports another shameful outrage on the part of the people of Russia. It’s just this sort of behavior that allows the West to justify simply writing off the Russian people as uncivilized and consign them to their fate as “Zaire with Permafrost.” It’s heartbreaking for those of us who dream of something better for Russia; we must confront the Russians with outrages of this kind and demand that they do better. They are becoming an embarassment to civilization itself.

The year has been rough for independent-minded media, and investigative journalists wondered at an awards ceremony Wednesday evening whether their often-perilous work was worth the effort.

If the ceremony was any indication, the answer appeared to be a resounding no. A mere 20 people showed up for the annual event, the Andrei Sakharov awards for journalism. They included an eight-member jury, five winners and three reporters assigned to cover the event.

Vadim Rechkalov, an investigative reporter with Moskovsky Komsomolets who received a runner-up prize, said he had won nearly every Russian journalism award but could not understand why corruption and human rights abuses continued to flourish.

“Nothing has changed, not even an iota — not in the courts, not anywhere else,” Rechkalov said. “It makes you wonder about the effectiveness of journalism” in Russia.

The ceremony opened with a moment of silence for investigative journalist Anna Politkovskaya, whose brazen shooting death in her Moscow apartment building in October shocked the West. Politkovskaya, who won the top prize in 2002 for her coverage of human rights abuses in Chechnya for Novaya Gazeta, received a posthumous lifetime achievement award Wednesday.

Such killings often serve as a rallying cry for journalists to push on in their investigations of abuse and corruption, said jury head Alexei Simonov, president of the Glasnost Defence Foundation. “When everything is awful, you discover that corporate solidarity has not died,” he said.

The top prize of $5,000 went to Anna Lebedeva, Novaya Gazeta’s correspondent in Rostov-on-Don, for a series of articles on human rights abuses. Four runners-up received $500 each. In all, the jury considered articles from 87 reporters in 49 cities.

In accepting the prize, Lebedeva lamented what she described as the thinning of ranks of independent investigative journalists. “I am often surrounded by colleagues, but there are fewer and fewer like-minded people around me,” the 27-year veteran reporter said.

Lebedeva later said that abuses had mushroomed so much that “there are almost no human rights left.”

Lebedeva has documented, among other things, the beatings of Sochi residents by OMON special forces last summer and the corruption that permitted the illegal construction of houses on wildlife reserves.

Lebedeva also wondered whether her reports made sense any more in a country where even President Vladimir Putin described the influence of Politkovskaya as “minimal” after her death.

But a look at this year’s submissions to the Sakharov event shows reporters must soldier on, said jury member Elvira Goryukhina, who won the top prize in 2001 for Chechnya. “When you read all of the submissions, the first thought is: ‘What a nightmare. What is happening in our country?'” she said.

Many articles covered Chechnya, but other main themes included housing reform, the environment and children’s rights.

Goryukhina said she regretted that few people had had the chance to read the articles, given the dominance of state-controlled media. But, she added, “not everything is lost yet.”

Another runner-up, Tamara Proskuryakova of Vologradskaya Pravda, vowed to press on. “I still like to believe that my scribbles help people believe that the truth still exists,” she said.

Proskuryakova said tears had streamed down her cheeks as she wrote about corruption in local authorities’ dealings with rural land in the Volgograd region.

Igor Nefyodov, who won last year’s top prize for his post-Beslan coverage in Izvestia, praised the courage of provincial reporters, many of whom write about corruption in local government even though their publications are somehow controlled by the government. “I can honestly say that I don’t know whether I could cover such topics,” he said.

Tatyana Kuzmina of Orlovskiye Novosti shot back: “The issue is not only having the courage to write, but finding someone to print it.”

Nefyodov has left Izvestia, which was taken over by state-controlled Gazprom in the fall of 2005.

This year, Kommersant, the country’s last independent-minded national daily, was sold to metals magnate and Gazprom executive Alisher Usmanov. The sale highlighted a broader Kremlin-backed strategy of national media buyouts by loyal businessmen and Gazprom.

In other developments that rattled the journalism community this year, Boris Stomakhin, editor of Radikalnaya Politika, a Moscow-based monthly newspaper, was sentenced to an unprecedented five years in prison on Nov. 21 on charges of inciting ethnic hatred in reports about the conflict in Chechnya.

In October, Vladimir Rakhmankov, editor of the Internet magazine Kursiv, was fined 20,000 rubles ($750) for referring to Putin as “a phallic symbol.”

In February, Pravo-Zashchita editor Stanislav Dmitriyevsky was given a suspended two-year sentence for publishing comments from Chechen rebel leaders who were calling for peace talks in 2004.

More than 200 journalists have been killed in Russia in the past 15 years, according to a group of journalists who plan to stage a rally on Pushkin Square on Saturday to commemorate the dead.

The organizers had initially asked Moscow city authorities to allow them stage a march. But the city said a march would violate the constitutional rights of Muscovites by impeding traffic.

Nashi Thugs (Putin’s Proxies) Stalk the British Embassy Like Wolves

The Telegraph reports that the Kremlin’s proxy thugs from Nashi have been harrassing the British Ambassador for months now (“when I go out of the house, they follow me” says Anthony Brenton, pictured left).

Britain’s ambassador to Moscow yesterday directly linked the Kremlin to a campaign of harassment waged against him by an ultra-nationalist youth movement.

Anthony Brenton said he had been the victim of four months of co-ordinated intimidation by the Nashi youth movement, an organisation that has pledged loyalty to President Vladimir Putin.

“Nashi’s links with the Kremlin are well enough known,” he said. “Their leader has met with President Putin many times and one of his advisers was known to have been involved in its creation.

“Even if one were to accept that they are not directly controlled by the Kremlin, this level of influence suggests that the Kremlin could stop them if it wanted to.”

The movement has obtained copies of Mr Brenton’s daily diary – something that could suggest the involvement of the FSB spy agency – and used it to trail the ambassador wherever he goes. Nashi youths have staked out his home and the embassy. They follow him, block his car on occasions and disrupt meetings. At one lunch, heckling youths rocked his chair, raising fears that he would be assaulted.

Mr Brenton said he could not go shopping without facing a barrage of abuse. “When I go out of the house to buy cat food, they follow me and start waving banners,” he said.

Ostensibly at least, Nashi’s campaign stems from Mr Brenton’s attendance at a summit convened by Russia’s liberal opposition in July to protest the limits imposed on civil society by the Kremlin. Nashi says that Mr Brenton participated in a “fascist meeting” and promised to hound him until he apologised for attending.

Mr Brenton’s speech also infuriated Mr Putin. Britain, which has emerged as Russia’s fiercest critic within the European Union, has particularly irked the Kremlin.

The Russian government’s reaction to repeated complaints over Nashi’s actions from the embassy revealed how low Britain’s stock has fallen, even before differences emerged following the murder of ex-KGB officer Alexander Litvinenko.

Although Russia is a signatory to the Vienna Protocols, which require host countries to ensure the safety of diplomats, the foreign ministry initially insisted that Nashi’s actions were “not illegal”. Even when they later agreed to act, Nashi’s campaign has continued unabated.

Created last year largely by Vladislav Surkov, the deputy chief of the presidential staff, Nashi has become a useful tool for crushing dissent. Nashi youths have infiltrated opposition movements, beat-en up activists and held massive demonstrations.

Other tools have been used to target other British interests in Russia. The British Council in St Petersburg suffered repeated tax inspections earlier in the year and is now being threatened with closure by the fire safety department and the BBC’s Russia service has been taken off the air several times in the past year. Russia’s problem with Britain essentially stems from court decisions granting political asylum to two of Mr Putin’s least favourite people: Boris Berezovsky, the oligarch who helped bring the president to power but then turned against him, and Ahmed Zakayev, a Chechen rebel envoy.

Relations soured further this year when the Kremlin claimed that four British diplomats had used a transmitter hidden in a rock to spy on Russia and Mr Brenton challenged Mr Putin’s democratic record.

UPDATE: Now, if you can believe it, one of the Nashi thugs has accused the AMBASSADOR of assaulting HIM after the Ambassador dared to object to the harassment. What’s next? Will Russia kick the ambassador out of the country? Will it repeal diplomatic immunity and try to put him in prison next to Trepashkin? Will it target his wife and children? Welcome to the Neo-Soviet Union!

Nashi Thugs (Putin’s Proxies) Stalk the British Embassy Like Wolves

The Telegraph reports that the Kremlin’s proxy thugs from Nashi have been harrassing the British Ambassador for months now (“when I go out of the house, they follow me” says Anthony Brenton, pictured left).

Britain’s ambassador to Moscow yesterday directly linked the Kremlin to a campaign of harassment waged against him by an ultra-nationalist youth movement.

Anthony Brenton said he had been the victim of four months of co-ordinated intimidation by the Nashi youth movement, an organisation that has pledged loyalty to President Vladimir Putin.

“Nashi’s links with the Kremlin are well enough known,” he said. “Their leader has met with President Putin many times and one of his advisers was known to have been involved in its creation.

“Even if one were to accept that they are not directly controlled by the Kremlin, this level of influence suggests that the Kremlin could stop them if it wanted to.”

The movement has obtained copies of Mr Brenton’s daily diary – something that could suggest the involvement of the FSB spy agency – and used it to trail the ambassador wherever he goes. Nashi youths have staked out his home and the embassy. They follow him, block his car on occasions and disrupt meetings. At one lunch, heckling youths rocked his chair, raising fears that he would be assaulted.

Mr Brenton said he could not go shopping without facing a barrage of abuse. “When I go out of the house to buy cat food, they follow me and start waving banners,” he said.

Ostensibly at least, Nashi’s campaign stems from Mr Brenton’s attendance at a summit convened by Russia’s liberal opposition in July to protest the limits imposed on civil society by the Kremlin. Nashi says that Mr Brenton participated in a “fascist meeting” and promised to hound him until he apologised for attending.

Mr Brenton’s speech also infuriated Mr Putin. Britain, which has emerged as Russia’s fiercest critic within the European Union, has particularly irked the Kremlin.

The Russian government’s reaction to repeated complaints over Nashi’s actions from the embassy revealed how low Britain’s stock has fallen, even before differences emerged following the murder of ex-KGB officer Alexander Litvinenko.

Although Russia is a signatory to the Vienna Protocols, which require host countries to ensure the safety of diplomats, the foreign ministry initially insisted that Nashi’s actions were “not illegal”. Even when they later agreed to act, Nashi’s campaign has continued unabated.

Created last year largely by Vladislav Surkov, the deputy chief of the presidential staff, Nashi has become a useful tool for crushing dissent. Nashi youths have infiltrated opposition movements, beat-en up activists and held massive demonstrations.

Other tools have been used to target other British interests in Russia. The British Council in St Petersburg suffered repeated tax inspections earlier in the year and is now being threatened with closure by the fire safety department and the BBC’s Russia service has been taken off the air several times in the past year. Russia’s problem with Britain essentially stems from court decisions granting political asylum to two of Mr Putin’s least favourite people: Boris Berezovsky, the oligarch who helped bring the president to power but then turned against him, and Ahmed Zakayev, a Chechen rebel envoy.

Relations soured further this year when the Kremlin claimed that four British diplomats had used a transmitter hidden in a rock to spy on Russia and Mr Brenton challenged Mr Putin’s democratic record.

UPDATE: Now, if you can believe it, one of the Nashi thugs has accused the AMBASSADOR of assaulting HIM after the Ambassador dared to object to the harassment. What’s next? Will Russia kick the ambassador out of the country? Will it repeal diplomatic immunity and try to put him in prison next to Trepashkin? Will it target his wife and children? Welcome to the Neo-Soviet Union!

Nashi Thugs (Putin’s Proxies) Stalk the British Embassy Like Wolves

The Telegraph reports that the Kremlin’s proxy thugs from Nashi have been harrassing the British Ambassador for months now (“when I go out of the house, they follow me” says Anthony Brenton, pictured left).

Britain’s ambassador to Moscow yesterday directly linked the Kremlin to a campaign of harassment waged against him by an ultra-nationalist youth movement.

Anthony Brenton said he had been the victim of four months of co-ordinated intimidation by the Nashi youth movement, an organisation that has pledged loyalty to President Vladimir Putin.

“Nashi’s links with the Kremlin are well enough known,” he said. “Their leader has met with President Putin many times and one of his advisers was known to have been involved in its creation.

“Even if one were to accept that they are not directly controlled by the Kremlin, this level of influence suggests that the Kremlin could stop them if it wanted to.”

The movement has obtained copies of Mr Brenton’s daily diary – something that could suggest the involvement of the FSB spy agency – and used it to trail the ambassador wherever he goes. Nashi youths have staked out his home and the embassy. They follow him, block his car on occasions and disrupt meetings. At one lunch, heckling youths rocked his chair, raising fears that he would be assaulted.

Mr Brenton said he could not go shopping without facing a barrage of abuse. “When I go out of the house to buy cat food, they follow me and start waving banners,” he said.

Ostensibly at least, Nashi’s campaign stems from Mr Brenton’s attendance at a summit convened by Russia’s liberal opposition in July to protest the limits imposed on civil society by the Kremlin. Nashi says that Mr Brenton participated in a “fascist meeting” and promised to hound him until he apologised for attending.

Mr Brenton’s speech also infuriated Mr Putin. Britain, which has emerged as Russia’s fiercest critic within the European Union, has particularly irked the Kremlin.

The Russian government’s reaction to repeated complaints over Nashi’s actions from the embassy revealed how low Britain’s stock has fallen, even before differences emerged following the murder of ex-KGB officer Alexander Litvinenko.

Although Russia is a signatory to the Vienna Protocols, which require host countries to ensure the safety of diplomats, the foreign ministry initially insisted that Nashi’s actions were “not illegal”. Even when they later agreed to act, Nashi’s campaign has continued unabated.

Created last year largely by Vladislav Surkov, the deputy chief of the presidential staff, Nashi has become a useful tool for crushing dissent. Nashi youths have infiltrated opposition movements, beat-en up activists and held massive demonstrations.

Other tools have been used to target other British interests in Russia. The British Council in St Petersburg suffered repeated tax inspections earlier in the year and is now being threatened with closure by the fire safety department and the BBC’s Russia service has been taken off the air several times in the past year. Russia’s problem with Britain essentially stems from court decisions granting political asylum to two of Mr Putin’s least favourite people: Boris Berezovsky, the oligarch who helped bring the president to power but then turned against him, and Ahmed Zakayev, a Chechen rebel envoy.

Relations soured further this year when the Kremlin claimed that four British diplomats had used a transmitter hidden in a rock to spy on Russia and Mr Brenton challenged Mr Putin’s democratic record.

UPDATE: Now, if you can believe it, one of the Nashi thugs has accused the AMBASSADOR of assaulting HIM after the Ambassador dared to object to the harassment. What’s next? Will Russia kick the ambassador out of the country? Will it repeal diplomatic immunity and try to put him in prison next to Trepashkin? Will it target his wife and children? Welcome to the Neo-Soviet Union!

Nashi Thugs (Putin’s Proxies) Stalk the British Embassy Like Wolves

The Telegraph reports that the Kremlin’s proxy thugs from Nashi have been harrassing the British Ambassador for months now (“when I go out of the house, they follow me” says Anthony Brenton, pictured left).

Britain’s ambassador to Moscow yesterday directly linked the Kremlin to a campaign of harassment waged against him by an ultra-nationalist youth movement.

Anthony Brenton said he had been the victim of four months of co-ordinated intimidation by the Nashi youth movement, an organisation that has pledged loyalty to President Vladimir Putin.

“Nashi’s links with the Kremlin are well enough known,” he said. “Their leader has met with President Putin many times and one of his advisers was known to have been involved in its creation.

“Even if one were to accept that they are not directly controlled by the Kremlin, this level of influence suggests that the Kremlin could stop them if it wanted to.”

The movement has obtained copies of Mr Brenton’s daily diary – something that could suggest the involvement of the FSB spy agency – and used it to trail the ambassador wherever he goes. Nashi youths have staked out his home and the embassy. They follow him, block his car on occasions and disrupt meetings. At one lunch, heckling youths rocked his chair, raising fears that he would be assaulted.

Mr Brenton said he could not go shopping without facing a barrage of abuse. “When I go out of the house to buy cat food, they follow me and start waving banners,” he said.

Ostensibly at least, Nashi’s campaign stems from Mr Brenton’s attendance at a summit convened by Russia’s liberal opposition in July to protest the limits imposed on civil society by the Kremlin. Nashi says that Mr Brenton participated in a “fascist meeting” and promised to hound him until he apologised for attending.

Mr Brenton’s speech also infuriated Mr Putin. Britain, which has emerged as Russia’s fiercest critic within the European Union, has particularly irked the Kremlin.

The Russian government’s reaction to repeated complaints over Nashi’s actions from the embassy revealed how low Britain’s stock has fallen, even before differences emerged following the murder of ex-KGB officer Alexander Litvinenko.

Although Russia is a signatory to the Vienna Protocols, which require host countries to ensure the safety of diplomats, the foreign ministry initially insisted that Nashi’s actions were “not illegal”. Even when they later agreed to act, Nashi’s campaign has continued unabated.

Created last year largely by Vladislav Surkov, the deputy chief of the presidential staff, Nashi has become a useful tool for crushing dissent. Nashi youths have infiltrated opposition movements, beat-en up activists and held massive demonstrations.

Other tools have been used to target other British interests in Russia. The British Council in St Petersburg suffered repeated tax inspections earlier in the year and is now being threatened with closure by the fire safety department and the BBC’s Russia service has been taken off the air several times in the past year. Russia’s problem with Britain essentially stems from court decisions granting political asylum to two of Mr Putin’s least favourite people: Boris Berezovsky, the oligarch who helped bring the president to power but then turned against him, and Ahmed Zakayev, a Chechen rebel envoy.

Relations soured further this year when the Kremlin claimed that four British diplomats had used a transmitter hidden in a rock to spy on Russia and Mr Brenton challenged Mr Putin’s democratic record.

UPDATE: Now, if you can believe it, one of the Nashi thugs has accused the AMBASSADOR of assaulting HIM after the Ambassador dared to object to the harassment. What’s next? Will Russia kick the ambassador out of the country? Will it repeal diplomatic immunity and try to put him in prison next to Trepashkin? Will it target his wife and children? Welcome to the Neo-Soviet Union!

Nashi Thugs (Putin’s Proxies) Stalk the British Embassy Like Wolves

The Telegraph reports that the Kremlin’s proxy thugs from Nashi have been harrassing the British Ambassador for months now (“when I go out of the house, they follow me” says Anthony Brenton, pictured left).

Britain’s ambassador to Moscow yesterday directly linked the Kremlin to a campaign of harassment waged against him by an ultra-nationalist youth movement.

Anthony Brenton said he had been the victim of four months of co-ordinated intimidation by the Nashi youth movement, an organisation that has pledged loyalty to President Vladimir Putin.

“Nashi’s links with the Kremlin are well enough known,” he said. “Their leader has met with President Putin many times and one of his advisers was known to have been involved in its creation.

“Even if one were to accept that they are not directly controlled by the Kremlin, this level of influence suggests that the Kremlin could stop them if it wanted to.”

The movement has obtained copies of Mr Brenton’s daily diary – something that could suggest the involvement of the FSB spy agency – and used it to trail the ambassador wherever he goes. Nashi youths have staked out his home and the embassy. They follow him, block his car on occasions and disrupt meetings. At one lunch, heckling youths rocked his chair, raising fears that he would be assaulted.

Mr Brenton said he could not go shopping without facing a barrage of abuse. “When I go out of the house to buy cat food, they follow me and start waving banners,” he said.

Ostensibly at least, Nashi’s campaign stems from Mr Brenton’s attendance at a summit convened by Russia’s liberal opposition in July to protest the limits imposed on civil society by the Kremlin. Nashi says that Mr Brenton participated in a “fascist meeting” and promised to hound him until he apologised for attending.

Mr Brenton’s speech also infuriated Mr Putin. Britain, which has emerged as Russia’s fiercest critic within the European Union, has particularly irked the Kremlin.

The Russian government’s reaction to repeated complaints over Nashi’s actions from the embassy revealed how low Britain’s stock has fallen, even before differences emerged following the murder of ex-KGB officer Alexander Litvinenko.

Although Russia is a signatory to the Vienna Protocols, which require host countries to ensure the safety of diplomats, the foreign ministry initially insisted that Nashi’s actions were “not illegal”. Even when they later agreed to act, Nashi’s campaign has continued unabated.

Created last year largely by Vladislav Surkov, the deputy chief of the presidential staff, Nashi has become a useful tool for crushing dissent. Nashi youths have infiltrated opposition movements, beat-en up activists and held massive demonstrations.

Other tools have been used to target other British interests in Russia. The British Council in St Petersburg suffered repeated tax inspections earlier in the year and is now being threatened with closure by the fire safety department and the BBC’s Russia service has been taken off the air several times in the past year. Russia’s problem with Britain essentially stems from court decisions granting political asylum to two of Mr Putin’s least favourite people: Boris Berezovsky, the oligarch who helped bring the president to power but then turned against him, and Ahmed Zakayev, a Chechen rebel envoy.

Relations soured further this year when the Kremlin claimed that four British diplomats had used a transmitter hidden in a rock to spy on Russia and Mr Brenton challenged Mr Putin’s democratic record.

UPDATE: Now, if you can believe it, one of the Nashi thugs has accused the AMBASSADOR of assaulting HIM after the Ambassador dared to object to the harassment. What’s next? Will Russia kick the ambassador out of the country? Will it repeal diplomatic immunity and try to put him in prison next to Trepashkin? Will it target his wife and children? Welcome to the Neo-Soviet Union!

Uh-Oh, Here comes Abramovich

Reader Steven Montgomery points out the concern being expressed in Washington as pro-Kremlin oligarch Roman Abramovich seeks to enter the U.S. steel market. The Financial Times reports (from London):

US authorities are to examine Roman Abramovich’s ties to the Kremlin as part of a national security review of a $2.3bn (£1.18bn) bid for Oregon Steel by a company controlled by the Russian billionaire.

Experts in Washington say the US government panel that reviews foreign deals will scrutinise the proposed takeover, announced last month, more closely if Mr Abramovich is found to be acting with the backing of the Russian government.

Mr Abramovich is believed to be close to Vladimir Putin, Russian president. The Russian steel company, Evraz, is controlled by Mr Abramovich and Alexander Abramov, group director.

Evraz and Oregon Steel said in regulatory filings that the companies intended to submit their deal to a voluntary review by the Committee on Foreign In-vestment. The committee is a secretive executive branch agency that vets deals on national security grounds.

If successful, the bid will be the largest Russian takeover of a US company.

The companies have said they do not anticipate that the deal will be blocked. Steel has traditionally not been considered a particularly sensitive asset.

But attorneys who work on such cases say the US government is likely to focus on Mr Abramovich’s relationship with the Kremlin.

“The government may not need to know every last special purpose vehicle [Mr Abramovich controls] but what they do need to know is whether Evraz is owned, controlled or influenced by a Russian or other government interest,” said Daniel Lucich, a former deputy assistant secretary at the Treasury.

Concern is increasing in Washington about Russia’s economic policies and its commitment to democracy. The White House is also under pressure to vet any politically sensitive transaction more carefully in the wake of the Dubai Ports World debacle, when the administration was heavily criticised for approving an unpopular transaction.

Toby Gati, a former official with the Clinton administration and adviser at Akin Gump, said the deal would inten­sify the US government’s interest in Russia’s drive to create national champions in key economic sectors.

Mr Abramovich sold his stake in oil company Sibneft to Gazprom, the Russian energy group, last year for $13bn.

When the owner of Chelsea football team then acquired a 41 per cent stake in Evraz in June, many in the market suspected Kremlin involvement.

Pavel Tatyanin, Evraz chief financial officer, told the FT the companies were committed to co-operating with regulatory authorities and securing regulatory approval in a “timely manner”.

The company has gained the support of an important ally in the United Steelworkers labour union, whichsaid the acquisition would improve job security for its members.

The John Birch Society offers further analysis.

LR on PP

Check out La Russophobe’s post on Publius Pundit entitled “The KGB-ification of Russia” and feel free to add your comments regarding this extremely interesting and vitally important trend in the Russian regime. As a show of loyalty to the entity which allows this blog to come to you free of charge, only those who register with Blogger can comment on La Russophobe — but anyone at all can comment on Publius (as long as you list an e-mail), it’s the best place to talk back to La Russophobe. All thoughts are welcome as we struggle to meet this frightening new challenge.

Sean Guillory: What’s WRONG with him? Another open letter

Dear Sean,

It seems you intend for your blog to step into the void created by the implosions of the Wally’s Accidental Russophile (falsely accused LR of calling for mass murder, wrongly predicted Russian women would dominate tennis, hasn’t posted since November 9th) and Konstantin’s Russian Blog (falsely accused LR of being a mental patient, wrongly reported Americans confused the country and state of Georgia, hasn’t posted since November 10th). Why you would wish to travel down a road that leads inevitably to ignominous failure is beyond us, but it’s a free country (since people like you don’t run it) so if you want to burst into flames who are we to try to stop you.

However, we must still ask that you please stop misleading your hapless readers by playing so fast and loose with facts. You’re giving the blogosphere a bad name (to say nothing of yourself). Unlike Wally or Konstantin, you make pretensions of scholarship and attempt to cloak yourself with the indicia of authority of a university, so your disinformation is a greater concern than theirs. Maybe you think that the blogosphere isn’t going to police itself, but you’re wrong, it’s going to. You’re risking your reputation to salve your frenzied, childish ego and rabid hatred of America. Step back from the abyss little boy, before it’s too late. This is your last warning.

First, you said Yegor Gaidar “has denied that his illness is the result of any nefarious wrongdoing.” That was a lie, and not an incidental one but a lie told specifically to support the anti-West propaganda conclusion you were spewing (i.e., that the West only believed Gaidar had been poisoned because of its paranoid hatred of Russia). When called on it, you deleted the statement from your post but did not admit your error in the post itself or reconsider the conclusion of your post, that the West was wrong to believe Gaidar had been poisoned and was succombing to its own crazed Russophobia, which turned out to be utterly bogus. Gaidar actually was poisoned, as he himself later stated.

After that, you said that an online poll showed 32% accusing George Bush of “bad democracy” while only 19% accused Vladimir Putin. You reported this before the poll had been operating long enough to have even the illusion of credibility, and when Putin moved ahead of Bush by 21% to 20% even among this crowd of crazed America-bashers, you didn’t correct the record. When called on the fundmentally spurious nature of the poll itself, you responded: “But I draw attention to it half joking and half to see what others like yourself think.” That’s rather disingenous, given your venemous attacks on George Bush throughout your blog, wouldn’t you say? Guess you don’t care how many readers might have been misled, do you?

Then, you went completely nutso and published the ravings of Mike Averko without warning your readers who he is. Even more shockingly, you said his “commentary has appeared in the New York Times” without mentioning the fact that this “commentary” consists solely of letters to the editor (your reader would know only by clicking through to a link and studying it). Thousands upon thousands of people have had letters to the editor published in the Times. That doesn’t mean it’s honest for them to say their “commentary has appeared” the paper. This kind of dishonesty will get you nowhere, fast. We’d also like to point out the breathtaking hypocrisy involved in your criticizing neo-cons for promoting religion in schools while simulatanously touting Russia Blog and Averko’s involvement therein, when Russia Blog is the creation of an entity dedicated to abolishing the teaching of evolution. Sean, you have more waffles than a House of Pancakes.

Finally, you said of your readers: “Currently, the average visitor spends four minutes on the site. So while the site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic, those who do come tend to read. The exposure will most likely be of quality rather than quantity.” More dishonesty, preceded by a failure to do research. If you’d asked us, Sean, we’d for instance have told you that although La Russophobe has more than twice as many daily visits as your blog does, we also have an average visit length of over four minutes, just like you. So the two are not at all mutually exclusive, except in your own possibly disturbed mind. The graph at the bottom of this page shows our the average length of a visit each day over the past month. As you can see, Sean, it peaks at 400 seconds per day, which is over 6.5 minutes. The shortest average duration we ever record is about 3.3 minutes (200 seconds). Your baseles smear against our readers offends us and we’re warning you to knock it off.

And, just for the record, perhaps your “site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic” because you choose to publish the insane ravings of a Russophile propagandist like Mike Averko and his ilk. Maybe it’s connected to your outrageous provocation of this blog, the most powerful of its kind on the planet (if you doubt that, Google Averko’s name and see what happens) — for instance, by allowing the crazed maniac Wally Shedd to libel us on your blog by falsely accusing us of calling for mass murder of Russians without even attempting to document his claim. Or it may have something to do with your persistent propagandizing and misleading of readers. Another possibility is that your readers don’t care for your haughty insults: What you’ve said is that anyone who reads any of those “enormous traffic” blogs is a moron — ever think that some of those people might be reading your blog too? Yet another is that your vacuous, selfish, childish contempt for all things American and your rationalization of dictatorship in Russia is too revolting to attract the attention of a wide audience. In paricular, your vicious smears against Russian hero Anna Politkovskaya might have repelled many. How ironic that you admit in a later post you’d never even actually gone so far as to read her stuff in detail before attacking her.

We suggest you stop spewing forth so much disinformation and gibberish, and go back to the one thing you do well, writing about the aspects of Russian history you’re familiar with and offering new insights about them. Frankly, the rest of what you do isn’t worth the virtual paper it’s printed on.

Sincerely yours,

La Russophobe

*****

F.Y.I.: Here are just a few examples of the “quality” comment on his blog that Sean was referring to, which he thinks will encourage respect for his output by showing the high intellectual capacity of his readership (his standards, we fear, are slipping):

azov is a pussy and his wife blows Mexicali’s

By the same token, ‘a car is not a car if u have to qualify it by adjoinders, such as red, or blue.’ :)”

a car is not a democracy. just because a red car is still a car does not mean that a democracy qualified by an adjoinder is still a democracy. two different things, apples and oranges. fallacious logic again.”

democracy is not a car, not matter how much u try to prove otherwise.”

Well, gee, duh… Of course a car is not a democracy.”

I would never discount labor unions or ignore them. They are one of the last positive things on the left. And I say that as a member of one.”

If you want paranoia, try US Democrat Richard Holbrooke. who describes the Ukraine as ‘our core zone of security’.”

“Actually you should compare Bush to Hitler and Stalin.”

LR: Yup, that’s real high quality stuff there, an awesome bunch of intellectuals, movers and shakers all, that Sean managed to pack in over there. Be sure you remember to nominate Sean’s blog for the Pulitzer Prize the next time there is an opening.

**********
La Russophobe’s Visit Duration Data (November 14 through December 14):

Sean Guillory: What’s WRONG with him? Another open letter

Dear Sean,

It seems you intend for your blog to step into the void created by the implosions of the Wally’s Accidental Russophile (falsely accused LR of calling for mass murder, wrongly predicted Russian women would dominate tennis, hasn’t posted since November 9th) and Konstantin’s Russian Blog (falsely accused LR of being a mental patient, wrongly reported Americans confused the country and state of Georgia, hasn’t posted since November 10th). Why you would wish to travel down a road that leads inevitably to ignominous failure is beyond us, but it’s a free country (since people like you don’t run it) so if you want to burst into flames who are we to try to stop you.

However, we must still ask that you please stop misleading your hapless readers by playing so fast and loose with facts. You’re giving the blogosphere a bad name (to say nothing of yourself). Unlike Wally or Konstantin, you make pretensions of scholarship and attempt to cloak yourself with the indicia of authority of a university, so your disinformation is a greater concern than theirs. Maybe you think that the blogosphere isn’t going to police itself, but you’re wrong, it’s going to. You’re risking your reputation to salve your frenzied, childish ego and rabid hatred of America. Step back from the abyss little boy, before it’s too late. This is your last warning.

First, you said Yegor Gaidar “has denied that his illness is the result of any nefarious wrongdoing.” That was a lie, and not an incidental one but a lie told specifically to support the anti-West propaganda conclusion you were spewing (i.e., that the West only believed Gaidar had been poisoned because of its paranoid hatred of Russia). When called on it, you deleted the statement from your post but did not admit your error in the post itself or reconsider the conclusion of your post, that the West was wrong to believe Gaidar had been poisoned and was succombing to its own crazed Russophobia, which turned out to be utterly bogus. Gaidar actually was poisoned, as he himself later stated.

After that, you said that an online poll showed 32% accusing George Bush of “bad democracy” while only 19% accused Vladimir Putin. You reported this before the poll had been operating long enough to have even the illusion of credibility, and when Putin moved ahead of Bush by 21% to 20% even among this crowd of crazed America-bashers, you didn’t correct the record. When called on the fundmentally spurious nature of the poll itself, you responded: “But I draw attention to it half joking and half to see what others like yourself think.” That’s rather disingenous, given your venemous attacks on George Bush throughout your blog, wouldn’t you say? Guess you don’t care how many readers might have been misled, do you?

Then, you went completely nutso and published the ravings of Mike Averko without warning your readers who he is. Even more shockingly, you said his “commentary has appeared in the New York Times” without mentioning the fact that this “commentary” consists solely of letters to the editor (your reader would know only by clicking through to a link and studying it). Thousands upon thousands of people have had letters to the editor published in the Times. That doesn’t mean it’s honest for them to say their “commentary has appeared” the paper. This kind of dishonesty will get you nowhere, fast. We’d also like to point out the breathtaking hypocrisy involved in your criticizing neo-cons for promoting religion in schools while simulatanously touting Russia Blog and Averko’s involvement therein, when Russia Blog is the creation of an entity dedicated to abolishing the teaching of evolution. Sean, you have more waffles than a House of Pancakes.

Finally, you said of your readers: “Currently, the average visitor spends four minutes on the site. So while the site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic, those who do come tend to read. The exposure will most likely be of quality rather than quantity.” More dishonesty, preceded by a failure to do research. If you’d asked us, Sean, we’d for instance have told you that although La Russophobe has more than twice as many daily visits as your blog does, we also have an average visit length of over four minutes, just like you. So the two are not at all mutually exclusive, except in your own possibly disturbed mind. The graph at the bottom of this page shows our the average length of a visit each day over the past month. As you can see, Sean, it peaks at 400 seconds per day, which is over 6.5 minutes. The shortest average duration we ever record is about 3.3 minutes (200 seconds). Your baseles smear against our readers offends us and we’re warning you to knock it off.

And, just for the record, perhaps your “site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic” because you choose to publish the insane ravings of a Russophile propagandist like Mike Averko and his ilk. Maybe it’s connected to your outrageous provocation of this blog, the most powerful of its kind on the planet (if you doubt that, Google Averko’s name and see what happens) — for instance, by allowing the crazed maniac Wally Shedd to libel us on your blog by falsely accusing us of calling for mass murder of Russians without even attempting to document his claim. Or it may have something to do with your persistent propagandizing and misleading of readers. Another possibility is that your readers don’t care for your haughty insults: What you’ve said is that anyone who reads any of those “enormous traffic” blogs is a moron — ever think that some of those people might be reading your blog too? Yet another is that your vacuous, selfish, childish contempt for all things American and your rationalization of dictatorship in Russia is too revolting to attract the attention of a wide audience. In paricular, your vicious smears against Russian hero Anna Politkovskaya might have repelled many. How ironic that you admit in a later post you’d never even actually gone so far as to read her stuff in detail before attacking her.

We suggest you stop spewing forth so much disinformation and gibberish, and go back to the one thing you do well, writing about the aspects of Russian history you’re familiar with and offering new insights about them. Frankly, the rest of what you do isn’t worth the virtual paper it’s printed on.

Sincerely yours,

La Russophobe

*****

F.Y.I.: Here are just a few examples of the “quality” comment on his blog that Sean was referring to, which he thinks will encourage respect for his output by showing the high intellectual capacity of his readership (his standards, we fear, are slipping):

azov is a pussy and his wife blows Mexicali’s

By the same token, ‘a car is not a car if u have to qualify it by adjoinders, such as red, or blue.’ :)”

a car is not a democracy. just because a red car is still a car does not mean that a democracy qualified by an adjoinder is still a democracy. two different things, apples and oranges. fallacious logic again.”

democracy is not a car, not matter how much u try to prove otherwise.”

Well, gee, duh… Of course a car is not a democracy.”

I would never discount labor unions or ignore them. They are one of the last positive things on the left. And I say that as a member of one.”

If you want paranoia, try US Democrat Richard Holbrooke. who describes the Ukraine as ‘our core zone of security’.”

“Actually you should compare Bush to Hitler and Stalin.”

LR: Yup, that’s real high quality stuff there, an awesome bunch of intellectuals, movers and shakers all, that Sean managed to pack in over there. Be sure you remember to nominate Sean’s blog for the Pulitzer Prize the next time there is an opening.

**********
La Russophobe’s Visit Duration Data (November 14 through December 14):

Sean Guillory: What’s WRONG with him? Another open letter

Dear Sean,

It seems you intend for your blog to step into the void created by the implosions of the Wally’s Accidental Russophile (falsely accused LR of calling for mass murder, wrongly predicted Russian women would dominate tennis, hasn’t posted since November 9th) and Konstantin’s Russian Blog (falsely accused LR of being a mental patient, wrongly reported Americans confused the country and state of Georgia, hasn’t posted since November 10th). Why you would wish to travel down a road that leads inevitably to ignominous failure is beyond us, but it’s a free country (since people like you don’t run it) so if you want to burst into flames who are we to try to stop you.

However, we must still ask that you please stop misleading your hapless readers by playing so fast and loose with facts. You’re giving the blogosphere a bad name (to say nothing of yourself). Unlike Wally or Konstantin, you make pretensions of scholarship and attempt to cloak yourself with the indicia of authority of a university, so your disinformation is a greater concern than theirs. Maybe you think that the blogosphere isn’t going to police itself, but you’re wrong, it’s going to. You’re risking your reputation to salve your frenzied, childish ego and rabid hatred of America. Step back from the abyss little boy, before it’s too late. This is your last warning.

First, you said Yegor Gaidar “has denied that his illness is the result of any nefarious wrongdoing.” That was a lie, and not an incidental one but a lie told specifically to support the anti-West propaganda conclusion you were spewing (i.e., that the West only believed Gaidar had been poisoned because of its paranoid hatred of Russia). When called on it, you deleted the statement from your post but did not admit your error in the post itself or reconsider the conclusion of your post, that the West was wrong to believe Gaidar had been poisoned and was succombing to its own crazed Russophobia, which turned out to be utterly bogus. Gaidar actually was poisoned, as he himself later stated.

After that, you said that an online poll showed 32% accusing George Bush of “bad democracy” while only 19% accused Vladimir Putin. You reported this before the poll had been operating long enough to have even the illusion of credibility, and when Putin moved ahead of Bush by 21% to 20% even among this crowd of crazed America-bashers, you didn’t correct the record. When called on the fundmentally spurious nature of the poll itself, you responded: “But I draw attention to it half joking and half to see what others like yourself think.” That’s rather disingenous, given your venemous attacks on George Bush throughout your blog, wouldn’t you say? Guess you don’t care how many readers might have been misled, do you?

Then, you went completely nutso and published the ravings of Mike Averko without warning your readers who he is. Even more shockingly, you said his “commentary has appeared in the New York Times” without mentioning the fact that this “commentary” consists solely of letters to the editor (your reader would know only by clicking through to a link and studying it). Thousands upon thousands of people have had letters to the editor published in the Times. That doesn’t mean it’s honest for them to say their “commentary has appeared” the paper. This kind of dishonesty will get you nowhere, fast. We’d also like to point out the breathtaking hypocrisy involved in your criticizing neo-cons for promoting religion in schools while simulatanously touting Russia Blog and Averko’s involvement therein, when Russia Blog is the creation of an entity dedicated to abolishing the teaching of evolution. Sean, you have more waffles than a House of Pancakes.

Finally, you said of your readers: “Currently, the average visitor spends four minutes on the site. So while the site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic, those who do come tend to read. The exposure will most likely be of quality rather than quantity.” More dishonesty, preceded by a failure to do research. If you’d asked us, Sean, we’d for instance have told you that although La Russophobe has more than twice as many daily visits as your blog does, we also have an average visit length of over four minutes, just like you. So the two are not at all mutually exclusive, except in your own possibly disturbed mind. The graph at the bottom of this page shows our the average length of a visit each day over the past month. As you can see, Sean, it peaks at 400 seconds per day, which is over 6.5 minutes. The shortest average duration we ever record is about 3.3 minutes (200 seconds). Your baseles smear against our readers offends us and we’re warning you to knock it off.

And, just for the record, perhaps your “site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic” because you choose to publish the insane ravings of a Russophile propagandist like Mike Averko and his ilk. Maybe it’s connected to your outrageous provocation of this blog, the most powerful of its kind on the planet (if you doubt that, Google Averko’s name and see what happens) — for instance, by allowing the crazed maniac Wally Shedd to libel us on your blog by falsely accusing us of calling for mass murder of Russians without even attempting to document his claim. Or it may have something to do with your persistent propagandizing and misleading of readers. Another possibility is that your readers don’t care for your haughty insults: What you’ve said is that anyone who reads any of those “enormous traffic” blogs is a moron — ever think that some of those people might be reading your blog too? Yet another is that your vacuous, selfish, childish contempt for all things American and your rationalization of dictatorship in Russia is too revolting to attract the attention of a wide audience. In paricular, your vicious smears against Russian hero Anna Politkovskaya might have repelled many. How ironic that you admit in a later post you’d never even actually gone so far as to read her stuff in detail before attacking her.

We suggest you stop spewing forth so much disinformation and gibberish, and go back to the one thing you do well, writing about the aspects of Russian history you’re familiar with and offering new insights about them. Frankly, the rest of what you do isn’t worth the virtual paper it’s printed on.

Sincerely yours,

La Russophobe

*****

F.Y.I.: Here are just a few examples of the “quality” comment on his blog that Sean was referring to, which he thinks will encourage respect for his output by showing the high intellectual capacity of his readership (his standards, we fear, are slipping):

azov is a pussy and his wife blows Mexicali’s

By the same token, ‘a car is not a car if u have to qualify it by adjoinders, such as red, or blue.’ :)”

a car is not a democracy. just because a red car is still a car does not mean that a democracy qualified by an adjoinder is still a democracy. two different things, apples and oranges. fallacious logic again.”

democracy is not a car, not matter how much u try to prove otherwise.”

Well, gee, duh… Of course a car is not a democracy.”

I would never discount labor unions or ignore them. They are one of the last positive things on the left. And I say that as a member of one.”

If you want paranoia, try US Democrat Richard Holbrooke. who describes the Ukraine as ‘our core zone of security’.”

“Actually you should compare Bush to Hitler and Stalin.”

LR: Yup, that’s real high quality stuff there, an awesome bunch of intellectuals, movers and shakers all, that Sean managed to pack in over there. Be sure you remember to nominate Sean’s blog for the Pulitzer Prize the next time there is an opening.

**********
La Russophobe’s Visit Duration Data (November 14 through December 14):

Sean Guillory: What’s WRONG with him? Another open letter

Dear Sean,

It seems you intend for your blog to step into the void created by the implosions of the Wally’s Accidental Russophile (falsely accused LR of calling for mass murder, wrongly predicted Russian women would dominate tennis, hasn’t posted since November 9th) and Konstantin’s Russian Blog (falsely accused LR of being a mental patient, wrongly reported Americans confused the country and state of Georgia, hasn’t posted since November 10th). Why you would wish to travel down a road that leads inevitably to ignominous failure is beyond us, but it’s a free country (since people like you don’t run it) so if you want to burst into flames who are we to try to stop you.

However, we must still ask that you please stop misleading your hapless readers by playing so fast and loose with facts. You’re giving the blogosphere a bad name (to say nothing of yourself). Unlike Wally or Konstantin, you make pretensions of scholarship and attempt to cloak yourself with the indicia of authority of a university, so your disinformation is a greater concern than theirs. Maybe you think that the blogosphere isn’t going to police itself, but you’re wrong, it’s going to. You’re risking your reputation to salve your frenzied, childish ego and rabid hatred of America. Step back from the abyss little boy, before it’s too late. This is your last warning.

First, you said Yegor Gaidar “has denied that his illness is the result of any nefarious wrongdoing.” That was a lie, and not an incidental one but a lie told specifically to support the anti-West propaganda conclusion you were spewing (i.e., that the West only believed Gaidar had been poisoned because of its paranoid hatred of Russia). When called on it, you deleted the statement from your post but did not admit your error in the post itself or reconsider the conclusion of your post, that the West was wrong to believe Gaidar had been poisoned and was succombing to its own crazed Russophobia, which turned out to be utterly bogus. Gaidar actually was poisoned, as he himself later stated.

After that, you said that an online poll showed 32% accusing George Bush of “bad democracy” while only 19% accused Vladimir Putin. You reported this before the poll had been operating long enough to have even the illusion of credibility, and when Putin moved ahead of Bush by 21% to 20% even among this crowd of crazed America-bashers, you didn’t correct the record. When called on the fundmentally spurious nature of the poll itself, you responded: “But I draw attention to it half joking and half to see what others like yourself think.” That’s rather disingenous, given your venemous attacks on George Bush throughout your blog, wouldn’t you say? Guess you don’t care how many readers might have been misled, do you?

Then, you went completely nutso and published the ravings of Mike Averko without warning your readers who he is. Even more shockingly, you said his “commentary has appeared in the New York Times” without mentioning the fact that this “commentary” consists solely of letters to the editor (your reader would know only by clicking through to a link and studying it). Thousands upon thousands of people have had letters to the editor published in the Times. That doesn’t mean it’s honest for them to say their “commentary has appeared” the paper. This kind of dishonesty will get you nowhere, fast. We’d also like to point out the breathtaking hypocrisy involved in your criticizing neo-cons for promoting religion in schools while simulatanously touting Russia Blog and Averko’s involvement therein, when Russia Blog is the creation of an entity dedicated to abolishing the teaching of evolution. Sean, you have more waffles than a House of Pancakes.

Finally, you said of your readers: “Currently, the average visitor spends four minutes on the site. So while the site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic, those who do come tend to read. The exposure will most likely be of quality rather than quantity.” More dishonesty, preceded by a failure to do research. If you’d asked us, Sean, we’d for instance have told you that although La Russophobe has more than twice as many daily visits as your blog does, we also have an average visit length of over four minutes, just like you. So the two are not at all mutually exclusive, except in your own possibly disturbed mind. The graph at the bottom of this page shows our the average length of a visit each day over the past month. As you can see, Sean, it peaks at 400 seconds per day, which is over 6.5 minutes. The shortest average duration we ever record is about 3.3 minutes (200 seconds). Your baseles smear against our readers offends us and we’re warning you to knock it off.

And, just for the record, perhaps your “site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic” because you choose to publish the insane ravings of a Russophile propagandist like Mike Averko and his ilk. Maybe it’s connected to your outrageous provocation of this blog, the most powerful of its kind on the planet (if you doubt that, Google Averko’s name and see what happens) — for instance, by allowing the crazed maniac Wally Shedd to libel us on your blog by falsely accusing us of calling for mass murder of Russians without even attempting to document his claim. Or it may have something to do with your persistent propagandizing and misleading of readers. Another possibility is that your readers don’t care for your haughty insults: What you’ve said is that anyone who reads any of those “enormous traffic” blogs is a moron — ever think that some of those people might be reading your blog too? Yet another is that your vacuous, selfish, childish contempt for all things American and your rationalization of dictatorship in Russia is too revolting to attract the attention of a wide audience. In paricular, your vicious smears against Russian hero Anna Politkovskaya might have repelled many. How ironic that you admit in a later post you’d never even actually gone so far as to read her stuff in detail before attacking her.

We suggest you stop spewing forth so much disinformation and gibberish, and go back to the one thing you do well, writing about the aspects of Russian history you’re familiar with and offering new insights about them. Frankly, the rest of what you do isn’t worth the virtual paper it’s printed on.

Sincerely yours,

La Russophobe

*****

F.Y.I.: Here are just a few examples of the “quality” comment on his blog that Sean was referring to, which he thinks will encourage respect for his output by showing the high intellectual capacity of his readership (his standards, we fear, are slipping):

azov is a pussy and his wife blows Mexicali’s

By the same token, ‘a car is not a car if u have to qualify it by adjoinders, such as red, or blue.’ :)”

a car is not a democracy. just because a red car is still a car does not mean that a democracy qualified by an adjoinder is still a democracy. two different things, apples and oranges. fallacious logic again.”

democracy is not a car, not matter how much u try to prove otherwise.”

Well, gee, duh… Of course a car is not a democracy.”

I would never discount labor unions or ignore them. They are one of the last positive things on the left. And I say that as a member of one.”

If you want paranoia, try US Democrat Richard Holbrooke. who describes the Ukraine as ‘our core zone of security’.”

“Actually you should compare Bush to Hitler and Stalin.”

LR: Yup, that’s real high quality stuff there, an awesome bunch of intellectuals, movers and shakers all, that Sean managed to pack in over there. Be sure you remember to nominate Sean’s blog for the Pulitzer Prize the next time there is an opening.

**********
La Russophobe’s Visit Duration Data (November 14 through December 14):

Sean Guillory: What’s WRONG with him? Another open letter

Dear Sean,

It seems you intend for your blog to step into the void created by the implosions of the Wally’s Accidental Russophile (falsely accused LR of calling for mass murder, wrongly predicted Russian women would dominate tennis, hasn’t posted since November 9th) and Konstantin’s Russian Blog (falsely accused LR of being a mental patient, wrongly reported Americans confused the country and state of Georgia, hasn’t posted since November 10th). Why you would wish to travel down a road that leads inevitably to ignominous failure is beyond us, but it’s a free country (since people like you don’t run it) so if you want to burst into flames who are we to try to stop you.

However, we must still ask that you please stop misleading your hapless readers by playing so fast and loose with facts. You’re giving the blogosphere a bad name (to say nothing of yourself). Unlike Wally or Konstantin, you make pretensions of scholarship and attempt to cloak yourself with the indicia of authority of a university, so your disinformation is a greater concern than theirs. Maybe you think that the blogosphere isn’t going to police itself, but you’re wrong, it’s going to. You’re risking your reputation to salve your frenzied, childish ego and rabid hatred of America. Step back from the abyss little boy, before it’s too late. This is your last warning.

First, you said Yegor Gaidar “has denied that his illness is the result of any nefarious wrongdoing.” That was a lie, and not an incidental one but a lie told specifically to support the anti-West propaganda conclusion you were spewing (i.e., that the West only believed Gaidar had been poisoned because of its paranoid hatred of Russia). When called on it, you deleted the statement from your post but did not admit your error in the post itself or reconsider the conclusion of your post, that the West was wrong to believe Gaidar had been poisoned and was succombing to its own crazed Russophobia, which turned out to be utterly bogus. Gaidar actually was poisoned, as he himself later stated.

After that, you said that an online poll showed 32% accusing George Bush of “bad democracy” while only 19% accused Vladimir Putin. You reported this before the poll had been operating long enough to have even the illusion of credibility, and when Putin moved ahead of Bush by 21% to 20% even among this crowd of crazed America-bashers, you didn’t correct the record. When called on the fundmentally spurious nature of the poll itself, you responded: “But I draw attention to it half joking and half to see what others like yourself think.” That’s rather disingenous, given your venemous attacks on George Bush throughout your blog, wouldn’t you say? Guess you don’t care how many readers might have been misled, do you?

Then, you went completely nutso and published the ravings of Mike Averko without warning your readers who he is. Even more shockingly, you said his “commentary has appeared in the New York Times” without mentioning the fact that this “commentary” consists solely of letters to the editor (your reader would know only by clicking through to a link and studying it). Thousands upon thousands of people have had letters to the editor published in the Times. That doesn’t mean it’s honest for them to say their “commentary has appeared” the paper. This kind of dishonesty will get you nowhere, fast. We’d also like to point out the breathtaking hypocrisy involved in your criticizing neo-cons for promoting religion in schools while simulatanously touting Russia Blog and Averko’s involvement therein, when Russia Blog is the creation of an entity dedicated to abolishing the teaching of evolution. Sean, you have more waffles than a House of Pancakes.

Finally, you said of your readers: “Currently, the average visitor spends four minutes on the site. So while the site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic, those who do come tend to read. The exposure will most likely be of quality rather than quantity.” More dishonesty, preceded by a failure to do research. If you’d asked us, Sean, we’d for instance have told you that although La Russophobe has more than twice as many daily visits as your blog does, we also have an average visit length of over four minutes, just like you. So the two are not at all mutually exclusive, except in your own possibly disturbed mind. The graph at the bottom of this page shows our the average length of a visit each day over the past month. As you can see, Sean, it peaks at 400 seconds per day, which is over 6.5 minutes. The shortest average duration we ever record is about 3.3 minutes (200 seconds). Your baseles smear against our readers offends us and we’re warning you to knock it off.

And, just for the record, perhaps your “site doesn’t have an enormous amount of daily traffic” because you choose to publish the insane ravings of a Russophile propagandist like Mike Averko and his ilk. Maybe it’s connected to your outrageous provocation of this blog, the most powerful of its kind on the planet (if you doubt that, Google Averko’s name and see what happens) — for instance, by allowing the crazed maniac Wally Shedd to libel us on your blog by falsely accusing us of calling for mass murder of Russians without even attempting to document his claim. Or it may have something to do with your persistent propagandizing and misleading of readers. Another possibility is that your readers don’t care for your haughty insults: What you’ve said is that anyone who reads any of those “enormous traffic” blogs is a moron — ever think that some of those people might be reading your blog too? Yet another is that your vacuous, selfish, childish contempt for all things American and your rationalization of dictatorship in Russia is too revolting to attract the attention of a wide audience. In paricular, your vicious smears against Russian hero Anna Politkovskaya might have repelled many. How ironic that you admit in a later post you’d never even actually gone so far as to read her stuff in detail before attacking her.

We suggest you stop spewing forth so much disinformation and gibberish, and go back to the one thing you do well, writing about the aspects of Russian history you’re familiar with and offering new insights about them. Frankly, the rest of what you do isn’t worth the virtual paper it’s printed on.

Sincerely yours,

La Russophobe

*****

F.Y.I.: Here are just a few examples of the “quality” comment on his blog that Sean was referring to, which he thinks will encourage respect for his output by showing the high intellectual capacity of his readership (his standards, we fear, are slipping):

azov is a pussy and his wife blows Mexicali’s

By the same token, ‘a car is not a car if u have to qualify it by adjoinders, such as red, or blue.’ :)”

a car is not a democracy. just because a red car is still a car does not mean that a democracy qualified by an adjoinder is still a democracy. two different things, apples and oranges. fallacious logic again.”

democracy is not a car, not matter how much u try to prove otherwise.”

Well, gee, duh… Of course a car is not a democracy.”

I would never discount labor unions or ignore them. They are one of the last positive things on the left. And I say that as a member of one.”

If you want paranoia, try US Democrat Richard Holbrooke. who describes the Ukraine as ‘our core zone of security’.”

“Actually you should compare Bush to Hitler and Stalin.”

LR: Yup, that’s real high quality stuff there, an awesome bunch of intellectuals, movers and shakers all, that Sean managed to pack in over there. Be sure you remember to nominate Sean’s blog for the Pulitzer Prize the next time there is an opening.

**********
La Russophobe’s Visit Duration Data (November 14 through December 14):